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turn definition

Overview

This page has 62 definitions of turn with English translations in 5 languages. Turn is a verb and noun. Examples of how to use turn in a sentence are shown. Also define these 63 related words and terms: direction, orientation, travel, stationary, tool, lathe, Julian calendar, cricket, ball, sideways, pitch, bounce, copular verb, become, get, color, leaf, autumn, metamorphose, fantasy, vampire, werewolf, zombie, professional wrestling, face, heel, turn a profit, soccer, control, obstetrics, printing, translate, role-playing game, undead, geometry, plane angle, measurement, walk, to and fro, promenade, rota, schedule, move, figure, complete, turnaround, poker, communal, Texas hold 'em, flop, kindness, malice, character, personality, nature, theater, finance, profit, stockjobber, tower, gymnastics, chess, and rook.

English turn definition

Pronunciation

Etymology 1

From Middle English turnen, from Old English turnian, tyrnan (to turn, rotate, revolve) and Old French torner (to turn), both from Latin tornāre (to round off, turn in a lathe), from tornus (lathe), from Ancient Greek τόρνος (tórnos, turning-lathe: a tool used for making circles), from Proto-Indo-European *terh₁- (to rub, rub by turning, turn, twist, bore). Cognate with Old English þrāwan (to turn, twist, wind). Displaced native Old English wendan.

Verb

turn (third-person singular simple present turns, present participle turning, simple past and past participle turned or (obsolete) turnt)

  1. To make a non-linear physical movement.
    1. (intransitive) Of a body, person, etc, to move around an axis through itself.
      the Earth turns;  turn on the spot
      • 1910, Emerson Hough, chapter I, in The Purchase Price: Or The Cause of Compromise, Indianapolis, Ind.: The Bobbs-Merrill Company, OCLC 639762314, page 0124:
        "A fine man, that Dunwody, yonder," commented the young captain, as they parted, and as he turned to his prisoner. "We'll see him on in Washington some day. He is strengthening his forces now against Mr. Benton out there. []."
    2. (transitive) To change the direction or orientation of, especially by rotation.
      Turn the knob clockwise.
      • 1879, R[ichard] J[efferies], “The First Gun”, in The Amateur Poacher, London: Smith, Elder, & Co., [], OCLC 752825175, pages 9–10:
        It was not far from the house; but the ground sank into a depression there, and the ridge of it behind shut out everything except just the roof of the tallest hayrick. As one sat on the sward behind the elm, with the back turned on the rick and nothing in front but the tall elms and the oaks in the other hedge, it was quite easy to fancy it the verge of the prairie with the backwoods close by.
      • 2013 July-August, Lee S. Langston, “The Adaptable Gas Turbine”, in American Scientist:
        Turbines have been around for a long time—windmills and water wheels are early examples. The name comes from the Latin turbo, meaning vortex, and thus the defining property of a turbine is that a fluid or gas turns the blades of a rotor, which is attached to a shaft that can perform useful work.
    3. (intransitive) to change one's direction of travel.
      She turned right at the corner.
      • 1897 December (indicated as 1898), Winston Churchill, chapter II, in The Celebrity: An Episode, New York, N.Y.: The Macmillan Company; London: Macmillan & Co., Ltd., OCLC 222716698, page 12:
        I had occasion [] to make a somewhat long business trip to Chicago, and on my return […] I found Farrar awaiting me in the railroad station. He smiled his wonted fraction by way of greeting, […], and finally leading me to his buggy, turned and drove out of town.
      • 1913, Joseph C. Lincoln, chapter 1, in Mr. Pratt's Patients:
        I stumbled along through the young pines and huckleberry bushes. Pretty soon I struck into a sort of path that, I cal'lated, might lead to the road I was hunting for. It twisted and turned, and, the first thing I knew, made a sudden bend around a bunch of bayberry scrub and opened out into a big clear space like a lawn.
    4. (transitive) To shape (something) symmetrically by rotating it against a stationary cutting tool, as on a lathe.
      She turned the table legs with care and precision.
    5. (by extension) To give form to; to shape or mould; to adapt.
    6. (transitive) To position (something) by folding it, or using its folds.
      turn the bed covers;  turn the pages
    7. (transitive, figuratively) To navigate through a book or other printed material.
      turn to page twenty;  turn through the book
    8. (transitive, cricket) Of a bowler, to make (the ball) move sideways off the pitch when it bounces.
    9. (intransitive, cricket) Of a ball, to move sideways off the pitch when it bounces.
    • Direction definition
      A theoretical line (physically or mentally) followed from a point of origin or towards a destination. May be relative (e.g. up, left, outbound, dorsal), geographical (e.g. north), rotational (e.g. clockwise), or with respect to an object or location (e.g. toward Boston). (1 of 6 direction definitions)
    • Orientation definition
      The determination of the relative position of something or someone. (1 of 12 orientation definitions)
    • Travel definition
      To be on a journey, often for pleasure or business and with luggage; to go from one place to another. (1 of 6 travel definitions)
    • Bounce definition
      To change the direction of motion after hitting an obstacle. (1 of 20 bounce definitions)
  2. (intransitive) To change condition or attitude.
    1. (copulative) To become (begin to be).
      The leaves turn brown in autumn. When I asked him for the money, he turned nasty.
      • 2007, Junius P. Rodriguez, Encyclopedia of Emancipation and Abolition in the Transatlantic World:
        The former-slaves-turned-abolitionists Quobna Ottobah Cugoano and Olaudah Equiano were the chief organizers of the Sons of Africa.
      • 2012 April 21, Jonathan Jurejko, “Newcastle 3-0 Stoke”, in BBC Sport:
        The midfielder turned provider moments later, his exquisite reverse pass perfectly weighted for Cisse to race on to and slide past Stoke keeper Asmir Begovic.
      Synonyms: become, get
    2. (intransitive) To change the color of the leaves in the autumn.
      The hillside behind our house isn't generally much to look at, but once all the trees turn it's gorgeous.
    3. To change fundamentally; to metamorphose.
      Midas made everything turn to gold.  He turned into a monster every full moon.
      • 1907 August, Robert W[illiam] Chambers, “Silverside”, in The Younger Set, New York, N.Y.: D. Appleton & Company, OCLC 24962326, page 300:
        At her invitation he outlined for her the succeeding chapters with terse military accuracy; and what she liked best and best understood was avoidance of that false modesty which condescends, turning technicality into pabulum.
      • 2013 July-August, Henry Petroski, “Geothermal Energy”, in American Scientist, volume 101, number 4:
        Ancient nomads, wishing to ward off the evening chill and enjoy a meal around a campfire, had to collect wood and then spend time and effort coaxing the heat of friction out from between sticks to kindle a flame. With more settled people, animals were harnessed to capstans or caged in treadmills to turn grist into meal.
      1. (intransitive) To sour or spoil; to go bad.
        This milk has turned; it smells awful.
      2. (transitive) To make acid or sour; to ferment; to curdle.
        to turn cider or wine
      3. (transitive, fantasy) To change (a person) into a vampire, werewolf, zombie, etc.
        How long ago was he turned?
        • 2017, Michael J. Totten, Into the Wasteland: A Zombie Novel
          His companions had turned him on purpose. Annie, bless her heart, was immune.
    4. To reach a certain age.
      Charlie turns six on September 29.
    5. To hinge; to depend.
      The decision turns on a single fact.
    6. To rebel; to go against something formerly tolerated.
      The prisoners turned on the warden.
    7. To change personal condition.
      1. (professional wrestling) To change personalities, such as from being a face (good guy) to heel (bad guy) or vice versa.
      2. To become giddy; said of the head or brain.
      3. To sicken; to nauseate.
        The sight turned my stomach.
      4. To be nauseated; said of the stomach.
    • Color definition
      The spectral composition of visible light. (1 of 23 color definitions)
    • Face definition
      The front part of the head of a human or other animal, featuring the eyes, nose and mouth, and the surrounding area. (1 of 26 face definitions)
  3. (obsolete, reflexive) To change one's course of action; to take a new approach.
  4. (transitive, usually with over) To complete.
    They say they can turn the parts in two days.
  5. (transitive) To make (money); turn a profit.
    We turned a pretty penny with that little scheme.
  6. (transitive, soccer) Of a player, to go past an opposition player with the ball in one's control.
    • 2012 May 5, Phil McNulty, “Chelsea 2-1 Liverpool”, in BBC Sport:
      Liverpool introduced Carroll for Spearing and were rewarded after 64 minutes when he put them back in contention. Stewart Downing blocked Jose Bosingwa's attempted clearance, which fell into the path of Carroll. He turned John Terry superbly before firing high past Cech.
  7. To undergo the process of turning on a lathe.
    Ivory turns well.
  8. (obstetrics) To bring down the feet of a child in the womb, in order to facilitate delivery.
  9. (printing, dated) To invert a type of the same thickness, as a temporary substitute for any sort which is exhausted.
  10. (archaic) To translate.
    to turn the Iliad
    • 1735, Alexander Pope, The Prologue to the Satires
      who turns a Persian tale for half a crown
  11. (transitive, role-playing games) To magically or divinely attack undead.
Synonyms
Derived terms
Translations
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Dictionary:Entry layout § Translations.

Etymology 2

Partly from Anglo-Norman *torn, from Latin turnus, from Ancient Greek τόρνος (tórnos), and partly an action noun from the verb turn.

Noun

turn (plural turns)

A: Turn (16)
B: Round turn
C: Two round turns
  1. A change of direction or orientation.
    Give the handle a turn, then pull it.
    • 1910, Emerson Hough, “A Lady in Company”, in The Purchase Price: Or The Cause of Compromise, Indianapolis, Ind.: The Bobbs-Merrill Company, OCLC 639762314, page 1:
      With just the turn of a shoulder she indicated the water front, where [] lay the good ship, Mount Vernon, river packet, the black smoke already pouring from her stacks. In turn he smiled and also shrugged a shoulder.
  2. A movement of an object about its own axis in one direction that continues until the object returns to its initial orientation.
    1. (geometry) A unit of plane angle measurement based on this movement.
  3. A walk to and fro.
    Let's take a turn in the garden.
    Synonym: promenade
  4. A chance to use (something) shared in sequence with others.
    They took turns playing with the new toy.
    • 1910, Emerson Hough, “A Lady in Company”, in The Purchase Price: Or The Cause of Compromise, Indianapolis, Ind.: The Bobbs-Merrill Company, OCLC 639762314, page 1:
      With just the turn of a shoulder she indicated the water front, where [] lay the good ship, Mount Vernon, river packet, the black smoke already pouring from her stacks. In turn he smiled and also shrugged a shoulder.
  5. A spell of work, especially the time allotted to a person in a rota or schedule.
    I cooked tonight, so it's your turn to do the dishes.
    • Rota definition
      A schedule that allocates some task, responsibility or (rarely) privilege between a set of people according to a (possibly periodic) calendar.
  6. One's chance to make a move in a game having two or more players.
  7. A figure in music, often denoted ~, consisting of the note above the one indicated, the note itself, the note below the one indicated, and the note itself again.
  8. The time required to complete a project.
    They quote a three-day turn on parts like those.
    Synonym: turnaround
  9. A fit or a period of giddiness.
    I've had a funny turn.
    • 1865 September 23, “Mrs. Brown and the Emperor of the French”, in Fun[1], London: Published (for the proprietors) by Thomas Baker, OCLC 752198897, page 17:
      I'm sure I never shall forget the turn young Simmons gave me when he came in with that paper as he'd been and copied out of a winder thro' being in a west-end house, []
    • 1886 January 5, Robert Louis Stevenson, “The Last Night”, in Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde, London: Longmans, Green, and Co., OCLC 762755901, pages 78–79:
      'Then you must know as well as the rest of us that there was something queer about that gentleman—something that gave a man a turn—I don't know rightly how to say it, sir, beyond this: that you felt it in your marrow kind of cold and thin.'
  10. A change in temperament or circumstance.
    She took a turn for the worse.
  11. (cricket) A sideways movement of the ball when it bounces (caused by rotation in flight).
  12. (poker) The fourth communal card in Texas hold 'em.
    • Texas Hold 'Em definition
      A variant of poker in which players receive two cards each, and five other cards are shared between them.
  13. (poker, obsolete) The flop (the first three community cards) in Texas hold 'em.
  14. A deed done to another; an act of kindness or malice.
    One good turn deserves another.
    I felt that the man was of a vindictive nature, and would do me an evil turn if he found the opportunity [].
    • Malice definition
      Intention to harm or deprive in an illegal or immoral way. Desire to take pleasure in another's misfortune. (1 of 2 malice definitions)
  15. A single loop of a coil.
  16. (rope) A pass behind or through an object.
  17. Character; personality; nature.
    • Personality definition
      A set of non-physical psychological and social qualities that make one person distinct from another. (1 of 8 personality definitions)
  18. (soccer) An instance of going past an opposition player with the ball in one's control.
  19. (circus, theater, especially physical comedy) A short skit, act, or routine.
    • 1960, Theatre Notebook (volumes 14-16, page 122)
      Between the pieces were individual turns, comic songs and dances.
  20. (printing, dated) A type turned upside down to serve for another character that is not available.
  21. (Britain, finance, historical) The profit made by a stockjobber, being the difference between the buying and selling prices.
    • 1977, Michael Arthur Firth, Valuation of Shares and the Efficient-markets Theory (page 11)
      There are usually at least two jobbers who specialise in the leading stocks, and this acts to keep the jobber's turn to a reasonable amount []
Synonyms
  • (change of direction or orientation):
  • (movement about an axis returning to the original orientation): 360° turn, complete rotation, complete turn, full rotation, full turn
  • (single loop of a coil): loop
  • (chance to use (something) shared in sequence with others): go
  • (one's chance to make a move in a game): go, move
  • (figure in music):
  • (time required to complete a project):
  • (fit or period of giddiness): dizziness, dizzy spell, giddiness
  • (change in temperament or circumstance): change, swing
  • (sideways movement of a cricket ball):
Derived terms
  • See also turning
  • Descendants
    Translations
    The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Dictionary:Entry layout § Translations.

    Derived terms

    See also

    Anagrams


    Finnish turn definition

    Etymology

    < English turn

    Pronunciation

    • IPA(key): /ˈtøːn/, [ˈt̪ø̞ːn]

    Noun

    turn

    1. (poker) turn (fourth communal card in Texas hold'em)

    Declension

    Inflection of turn (Kotus type 5/risti, no gradation)
    nominative turn turnit
    genitive turnin turnien
    partitive turnia turneja
    illative turniin turneihin
    singular plural
    nominative turn turnit
    accusative nom. turn turnit
    gen. turnin
    genitive turnin turnien
    partitive turnia turneja
    inessive turnissa turneissa
    elative turnista turneista
    illative turniin turneihin
    adessive turnilla turneilla
    ablative turnilta turneilta
    allative turnille turneille
    essive turnina turneina
    translative turniksi turneiksi
    instructive turnein
    abessive turnitta turneitta
    comitative turneineen
    Possessive forms of turn (type risti)
    possessor singular plural
    1st person turnini turnimme
    2nd person turnisi turninne
    3rd person turninsa

    Synonyms


    Icelandic turn definition

    Etymology

    From Latin turris (tower). Cognate with Danish tårn and German Turm. First appears in the 12th or 13th century.

    Pronunciation

    Noun

    turn m (genitive singular turns, nominative plural turnar)

    1. tower

    Declension


    Norwegian Bokmål turn definition

    Etymology

    From the verb turne; compare with German Turnen.

    Pronunciation

    • IPA(key): /tʉːɳ/
    • Rhymes: -ʉːɳ

    Noun

    turn m (indeclinable) (uncountable)

    1. gymnastics (athletic discipline)

    Related terms

    References


    Norwegian Nynorsk turn definition

    Etymology

    From the verb turne

    Noun

    turn m (uncountable)

    1. gymnastics (athletic discipline)

    Related terms

    References


    Romanian turn definition

    Etymology

    Borrowed from German Turm, from Latin turrem, accusative form of turris.

    Pronunciation

    Noun

    turn n (plural turnuri)

    1. tower
    2. (chess) rook

    Declension

    Synonyms

    See also

    Chess pieces in Romanian · piese de șah (layout · text)
    rege regină, damă tură, turn nebun cal pion