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front definition

Overview

This page has 55 definitions of front with English translations in 11 languages. Front is a noun, an adjective and verb. Examples of how to use front in a sentence are shown. Also define these 72 related words and terms: side, end, face, move, building, entrance, field, activity, public, covert, meteorology, interface, transition zone, airmass, density, precipitation, temperature, distribution, regulator, atmospheric, line, hail, military, area, army, conflict, lateral, element, flank, enemy, combat, command, Soviet, cheek, boldness, impudence, act, show, façade, persona, conspicuous, beginning, seafront, promenade, bellhop, client, call, grill, phonetics, pronounce, tongue, mouth, hard palate, vowel, on, to, confront, linguistics, cover, lead, spokesperson, money, financial, appearance, put on airs, feign, front, forehead, frontline, anatomy, architecture, and frount.

See also: Front and Front.

English front definition

Etymology

From Middle English front, frunt, frount, from Old French front, frunt, from Latin frons, frontem (forehead).

Pronunciation

Noun

front (countable and uncountable, plural fronts)

  1. The foremost side of something or the end that faces the direction it normally moves.
    • Face definition
      The front part of the head of a human or other animal, featuring the eyes, nose and mouth, and the surrounding area. (1 of 26 face definitions)
  2. The side of a building with the main entrance.
    • 1913, Joseph C. Lincoln, chapter 1, in Mr. Pratt's Patients:
      Pretty soon I struck into a sort of path […]. It twisted and turned, [] and opened out into a big clear space like a lawn. And, back of the lawn, was a big, old-fashioned house, with piazzas stretching in front of it, and all blazing with lights.
  3. A field of activity.
    • 2012 January 1, Stephen Ledoux, “Behaviorism at 100”, in American Scientist, volume 100, number 1, page 60:
      Becoming more aware of the progress that scientists have made on behavioral fronts can reduce the risk that other natural scientists will resort to mystical agential accounts when they exceed the limits of their own disciplinary training.
  4. A person or institution acting as the public face of some other, covert group.
    Officially it's a dry-cleaning shop, but everyone knows it's a front for the mafia.
    • Public definition
      Able to be seen or known by everyone; open to general view, happening without concealment. (1 of 6 public definitions)
  5. (meteorology) The interface or transition zone between two airmasses of different density, often resulting in precipitation. Since the temperature distribution is the most important regulator of atmospheric density, a front almost invariably separates airmasses of different temperature.
    We need to take the clothes off the line. The news reported a front is coming in from the east, and we can expect heavy rain and maybe hail.
    • Airmass definition
      a widespread body of air, the properties of which can be identified as: (a) having been established while that air was situated over a particular region of the Earth's surface (airmass source region) and (b) undergoing specific modifications while in transit away from the source region. An air mass is often defined as a widespread body of air that is approximately homogeneous in its horizontal extent, particularly with reference to temperature and moisture distribution; in addition, the vertical temperature and moisture variations are approximately the same over its horizontal extent. (1 of 2 airmass definitions)
  6. (military) An area where armies are engaged in conflict, especially the line of contact.
    • Army definition
      A large, highly organized military force, concerned mainly with ground (rather than air or naval) operations. (1 of 7 army definitions)
  7. (military) The lateral space occupied by an element measured from the extremity of one flank to the extremity of the other flank.
  8. (military) The direction of the enemy.
  9. (military) When a combat situation does not exist or is not assumed, the direction toward which the command is faced.
  10. (historical) A major military subdivision of the Soviet Army.
  11. (dated) Cheek; boldness; impudence.
    • Cheek definition
      The soft skin on each side of the face, below the eyes; the outer surface of the sides of the oral cavity. (1 of 9 cheek definitions)
  12. (informal) An act, show, façade, persona: an intentional and false impression of oneself.
    He says he likes hip-hop, but I think it's just a front.
    You don't need to put on a front. Just be yourself.
    • Façade definition
      Alternative form of facade.
  13. (historical) That which covers the foremost part of the head: a front piece of false hair worn by women.
  14. The most conspicuous part.
  15. (obsolete) The beginning.
  16. (Britain) A seafront or coastal promenade.
  17. (obsolete) The forehead or brow, the part of the face above the eyes; sometimes, also, the whole face.
  18. (slang, hotels, dated) The bellhop whose turn it is to answer a client's call, which is often the word "front" used as an exclamation.
  19. (slang, in the plural) A grill (jewellery worn on front teeth).
    • Grill definition
      A grating; a grid of wire or a sheet of material with a pattern of holes or slots, usually used to protect something while allowing the passage of air and liquids. Typical uses: to allow air through a fan while preventing fingers or objects from passing; to allow people to talk to somebody, while preventing attack. (1 of 9 grill definitions)

Synonyms

Antonyms

Hyponyms

  • (The foremost side of something or the end that faces the direction it normally moves): (nautical) bow (of a ship)

Derived terms

Related terms

Descendants

Translations

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Dictionary:Entry layout § Translations.

Adjective

front (comparative further front, superlative furthest front)

  1. Located at or near the front.
    The front runner was thirty meters ahead of her nearest competitor.
    • 2001, Fritz Stern, Einstein's German World
      You also were in the furthest front line in order to help and learn and to study the conditions for using the gas process [Gasver-fahren] of every kind.
  2. (comparable, phonetics) Pronounced with the highest part of the body of the tongue toward the front of the mouth, near the hard palate (most often describing a vowel).
    The English word dress has a front vowel in most dialects.
    • Phonetics definition
      The study of the physical sounds of human speech, concerned with the physical properties of speech sounds (phones), and the processes of their physiological production, auditory reception, and neurophysiological perception, and their representation by written symbols.
    • Hard Palate definition
      A thin horizontal bony plate of the skull, located in the roof of the mouth.

Synonyms

Antonyms

Translations

Verb

front (third-person singular simple present fronts, present participle fronting, simple past and past participle fronted)

  1. (intransitive, dated) To face (on, to); to be pointed in a given direction.
    • 1726 October 28, [Jonathan Swift], “The Author Gives Some Account of Himself and Family, His First Inducements to Travel. []”, in Travels into Several Remote Nations of the World. [] [Gulliver’s Travels], volume I, London: [] Benj[amin] Motte, [], OCLC 995220039, part I (A Voyage to Lilliput):
      The great gate fronting to the north was about four feet high, and almost two feet wide, through which I could easily creep.
    • 1939, Raymond Chandler, The Big Sleep, Penguin, 2011, p.35:
      The door fronted on a narrow run, like a footbridge over a gully, that filled the gap between the house wall and the edge of the bank.
    • 1999, George RR Martin, A Clash of Kings, Bantam, 2011, p.312:
      They emerged atop the broad curving steps that fronted on the Street of the Sisters, near the foot of Visenya's Hill.
    • 2010, Ingrid D Rowland, "The Siege of Rome", New York Review of Books, Blog, 26 March:
      The palazzo has always fronted on a bus stop—but this putative man of the people has kindly put an end to that public service.
  2. (transitive) To face, be opposite to.
    • 1749, John Cleland, Memoirs of a Woman of Pleasure, Penguin, 1985, p.66:
      After saluting her, he led her to a couch that fronted us, where they both sat down, and the young Genoese helped her to a glass of wine, with some Naples biscuit on a salver.
    • 1813, Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice:
      [] down they ran into the dining-room, which fronted the lane, in quest of this wonder; it was two ladies stopping in a low phaeton at the garden gate.
    • 1913, DH Lawrence, Sons and Lovers, Penguin, 2006, p.49:
      She sat on a seat under the alders in the cricket ground, and fronted the evening.
  3. (transitive) To face up to, to meet head-on, to confront.
    • 1594, Christopher Marlowe, Edward II, London: William Jones,[1]
      Know you not Gaueston hath store of golde,
      Which may in Ireland purchase him such friends,
      As he will front the mightiest of vs all,
    • 1603, Michel de Montaigne, chapter 6, in John Florio, transl., The Essayes [], book II, London: [] Val[entine] Simmes for Edward Blount [], OCLC 946730821:
      those that have willed to attaine to some greater excellence, have not beene content, at home, and at rest to expect the rigors of fortune []; but have rather gone to meet and front her before, and witting-earnestly cast themselves to the triall of the hardest difficulties.
    • 1623, William Shakespeare, King Henry IV, Part 2:
      What well-appointed leader fronts us here?
  4. (transitive) To adorn the front of; to put on the front.
    • 2001, Terry Goodkind, The Pillars of Creation, page 148:
      Three tiers of balconies fronted with roped columns supporting arched openings looked down on the marble hall.
  5. (phonetics, transitive, intransitive) To pronounce with the tongue in a front position.
    • 2005, Paul Skandera / Peter Burleigh, A Manual of English Phonetics and Phonology, page 48:
      The velar plosives are often fronted through the influence of a following front vowel, and retracted through the influence of a following back vowel.
  6. (linguistics, transitive) To move (a word or clause) to the start of a sentence (or series of adjectives, etc).
    • 2001, Arthur J. Holmer, Jan-Olof Svantesson, Åke Viberg, Proceedings of the 18th Scandinavian Conference of Linguistics
      [] in the clause, only the adjective may be fronted; but if both a past participle and a verbal particle are present, either may be fronted. Topicalization, in which maximal projections are fronted to express pragmatics such as contrast, emphasis, ...
    • 2010, George Melville Bolling, Bernard Bloch, Language
      A problem facing any syntactic analysis of hyperbaton is that nonconstituent strings are fronted [] In cases where the adjective is fronted with the determiner, the determiner is not doubled []
    • Linguistics definition
      The scientific study of language.
  7. (intransitive, slang) To act as a front (for); to cover (for).
    • 2007, Harold Robbins, A Stone for Danny Fisher, page 183:
      Everybody knew Skopas fronted for the fight mob even though he was officially the arena manager.
  8. (transitive) To lead or be the spokesperson of (a campaign, organisation etc.).
    • 2009 September 1, Mark Sweney, The Guardian:
      Ray Winstone is fronting a campaign for the Football Association that aims to stop pushy parents shouting abuse at their children during the grassroots football season.
    • Spokesperson definition
      A person who acts as the voice of a group of people.
  9. (transitive, colloquial) To provide money or financial assistance in advance to.
    • 2004, Danielle Steele, Ransom, p.104:
      I'm prepared to say that I fronted you the money for a business deal with me, and the investment paid off brilliantly.
  10. (intransitive, slang) To assume false or disingenuous appearances.
    Synonyms: put on airs, feign
    • 1993 November 19, Bobby Hill, “Mad Real”, in Washington City Paper[2]:
      So when I tell people where I'm from and check their reactions, I know in my heart I'm just frontin’. Because the way and where I lived then pales when compared to the way and where many youths are living today.
    • 1994, Rivers Cuomo (lyrics and music), “Buddy Holly”, performed by Weezer:
      What's with these homies dissin' my girl? / Why do they gotta front?
    • 2008, Briscoe/Akinyemi, ‘Womanizer’:
      Boy don't try to front, / I-I know just-just what you are, are-are.
    • 2008 Markus Naerheim, The City, p.531
      You know damned straight what this is about, or you ain't as smart as you been frontin'.
  11. (transitive) To deceive or attempt to deceive someone with false or disingenuous appearances (on).
    • 1992, “So What'cha Want”, performed by The Beastie Boys:
      You think that you can front when revelation comes? / You can't front on that
  12. (transitive) To appear before.
    to front court

Translations

See also


Catalan front definition

Etymology

From Old Occitan front, from Latin frontem, accusative singular of frōns, from Proto-Indo-European *bʰron-t-, from *bʰren- (project).

Pronunciation

Noun

front m (plural fronts)

  1. front
  2. forehead

Derived terms

Related terms

Further reading


Czech front definition

Noun

front m

  1. front (subdivision of the Soviet army)

Dutch front definition

Etymology

From Old French front (noun), fronter (verb), from Latin frons (forehead).

Pronunciation

Noun

front n (plural fronten, diminutive frontje n)

  1. front

Derived terms


French front definition

Etymology

From Old French front, from Latin frontem, accusative singular of frōns, from Proto-Indo-European *bʰron-t-, from *bʰren- (project).

Pronunciation

Noun

front m (plural fronts)

  1. forehead
  2. (military) front, frontline

Derived terms

Related terms

Descendants

See also

Further reading


Friulian front definition

Etymology

From Latin frontem, accusative singular of frōns.

Noun

front m (plural fronts)

  1. (anatomy) forehead

Hungarian front definition

Etymology

Borrowed from German Front, from French fronte, from Latin frons, frontis.[1]

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈfront]
  • Hyphenation: front
  • Rhymes: -ont

Noun

front (plural frontok)

  1. (military) front (an area where armies are engaged in conflict)
  2. (military) a unit composed of several, normally three, army groups, cf. German Front, [2a]
  3. (meteorology) front (the interface or transition zone between two airmasses of different density)
  4. (architecture) front, face (the side of a building with the main entrance)

Declension

Inflection (stem in -o-, back harmony)
singular plural
nominative front frontok
accusative frontot frontokat
dative frontnak frontoknak
instrumental fronttal frontokkal
causal-final frontért frontokért
translative fronttá frontokká
terminative frontig frontokig
essive-formal frontként frontokként
essive-modal
inessive frontban frontokban
superessive fronton frontokon
adessive frontnál frontoknál
illative frontba frontokba
sublative frontra frontokra
allative fronthoz frontokhoz
elative frontból frontokból
delative frontról frontokról
ablative fronttól frontoktól
non-attributive
possessive - singular
fronté frontoké
non-attributive
possessive - plural
frontéi frontokéi
Possessive forms of front
possessor single possession multiple possessions
1st person sing. frontom frontjaim
2nd person sing. frontod frontjaid
3rd person sing. frontja frontjai
1st person plural frontunk frontjaink
2nd person plural frontotok frontjaitok
3rd person plural frontjuk frontjaik

Coordinate terms

References

  1. ^ Tótfalusi, István. Idegenszó-tár: Idegen szavak értelmező és etimológiai szótára (’A Storehouse of Foreign Words: an explanatory and etymological dictionary of foreign words’). Budapest: Tinta Könyvkiadó, 2005. →ISBN

Middle English front definition

Noun

front

  1. Alternative form of frount
    • Frount definition
      the front; the forward side of something: The forehead; the front of one's upper head. The head of a troop or military force. The frontispiece or front of a building. A forwards projection or point. A drape over an altar. The face; the front of one's head. The access side of a property or parcel of land. (1 of 8 frount definitions)

Norman front definition

Etymology

From Old French front, from Latin frōns, frontem.

Noun

front m (plural fronts)

  1. (military) front

Norwegian Bokmål front definition

Etymology

Borrowed from French front.

Noun

front m (definite singular fronten, indefinite plural fronter, definite plural frontene)

  1. front

Synonyms

Derived terms

References


Norwegian Nynorsk front definition

Etymology

Borrowed from French front.

Noun

front m (definite singular fronten, indefinite plural frontar, definite plural frontane)

  1. front

Synonyms

  • framside

Derived terms

References


Old French front definition

Etymology

From Latin frōns, frontem.

Noun

front m (oblique plural fronz or frontz, nominative singular fronz or frontz, nominative plural front)

  1. forehead
  2. (military) front

Descendants


Serbo-Croatian front definition

Alternative forms

Pronunciation

Noun

frȍnt m (Cyrillic spelling фро̏нт)

  1. (military) front

Declension


Swedish front definition

Pronunciation

Noun

front c

  1. The front end or side of something.
    Bilen hade fått en ful buckla på fronten.
    "There was an ugly bump on the front of the car."
  2. front - the area were two armies are fighting each other.
    På västfronten intet nytt (All Quiet on the Western Front, book by Erich Maria Remarque)
  3. front - area were hot and cold air meet
  4. front - one aspect of a larger undertaking which is temporarily seen as a separate undertaking in order to evaluate its progress in relationship to the whole.

Declension

Declension of front 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative front fronten fronter fronterna
Genitive fronts frontens fronters fronternas

Derived terms

  • västfront
  • östfront
  • kallfront
  • varmfront

Anagrams