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kill

Overview

This page has 34 definitions of kill with English translations in 4 languages. Kill is a verb, noun, an adverb and adjective. Examples of how to use kill in a sentence are shown. Also define these 54 related words and terms: death, extinguish, life, inoperative, stop, cease, void, terminate, amaze, exceed, stun, incapacitate, pain, discomfort, distress, dissatisfaction, revulsion, use up, waste, overwhelm, effect, overpower, defeat, business, punish, severely, sports, out of play, mathematics, computing, Internet, IRC, disconnect, network, metallurgy, deadmelt, killing, blow, volleyball, ground, ball, court, rally, creek, kiln, killen, sow, ring, make, noise, cool, language, female, and kid.

See also: Kill and kíll

English

Pronunciation

Etymology 1

From Middle English killen, kyllen, cüllen (to strike, beat, cut), of obscure origin.

Compare also Middle Dutch killen, kellen (to kill), Middle Low German killen (to ache strongly, cause one great pain), Middle High German kellen (to torment; torture).

Verb

kill (third-person singular simple present kills, present participle killing, simple past and past participle killed)

  1. (transitive) To put to death; to extinguish the life of.
    Smoking kills more people each year than alcohol and drugs combined.
  2. (transitive) To render inoperative.
    He killed the engine and turned off the headlights, but remained in the car, waiting.
    • 1978, John Farris, The Fury
      Peter: Ask Childers if it was worth his arm.
      Policeman: What did you do to his arm, Peter?
      Peter: I killed it, with a machine gun.
  3. (transitive, figuratively) To stop, cease, or render void; to terminate.
    The editor decided to kill the story.
    The news that a hurricane had destroyed our beach house killed our plans to sell it.
    My computer wouldn't respond until I killed some of the running processes.
  4. (transitive, figuratively, hyperbolic) To amaze, exceed, stun, or otherwise incapacitate.
    That night, she was dressed to kill.
    That joke always kills me.
  5. (transitive, figuratively, hyperbolic) To cause great pain, discomfort, or distress to.
    These tight shoes are killing my feet.
    • 2008 October, Davy Rothbart, “How I caught up with dad”, in Men's Health, volume 23, number 8, ISSN 1054-4836, page 110:
      two laps into our first walk, my dad needed to sit down. His back and legs were killing him. "You'll be okay," I assured him. "You just need to shake off the rust."
      I gave him a couple ofAdvil and, after a few minutes, urged him back onto the track.
  6. (transitive, figuratively) To produce feelings of dissatisfaction or revulsion in.
    It kills me to throw out three whole turkeys, but I can't get anyone to take them and they've already started to go bad.
    It kills me to learn how many poor people are practically starving in this country while rich moguls spend such outrageous amounts on useless luxuries.
  7. (transitive) To use up or to waste.
    I'm just doing this to kill time.
    He told the bartender, pointing at the bottle of scotch he planned to consume, "Leave it, I'm going to kill the bottle."
  8. (transitive, figuratively, informal) To exert an overwhelming effect on.
    Look at the amount of destruction to the enemy base. We pretty much killed their ability to retaliate anymore.
  9. (transitive, figuratively, hyperbolic) To overpower, overwhelm, or defeat.
    The team had absolutely killed their traditional rivals, and the local sports bars were raucous with celebrations.
  10. (transitive) To force a company out of business.
  11. (intransitive, informal, hyperbolic) To produce intense pain.
    You don't ever want to get rabies. The doctor will have to give you multiple shots and they really kill.
  12. (figuratively, informal, hyperbolic, transitive) To punish severely.
    My parents are going to kill me!
    • Severely definition
      In a severe manner.
  13. (transitive, sports) To strike (a ball, etc.) with such force and placement as to make a shot that is impossible to defend against, usually winning a point.
    • 2011 February 4, Gareth Roberts, “Wales 19-26 England”, in BBC[2]:
      That close call encouraged Wales to launch another series of attacks that ended when lock Louis Deacon killed the ball illegally in the shadow of England's posts.
  14. (transitive, sports) To cause (a ball, etc.) to be out of play, resulting in a stoppage of gameplay.
    • 2015 May 10, Schmook, Nathan, “Billings vs Bont”, in St Kilda Football Club[3]:
      As the ball was delivered deep into St Kilda's forward line by Billings, Bontempelli had position on the goal line, with a pack forming in front of him. He decided to fly but didn't kill the ball, leaving it to spill where he had been positioned moments earlier. Jack Sinclair gratefully swooped and kicked a goal that cut the margin to five points.
    • Out Of Play definition
      Unavailable to be played according to the rules of the game in question.
  15. To succeed with an audience, especially in comedy.
    • 2012, Yael Kohen, We Killed: The Rise of Women in American Comedy[4]:
      When comics fail, they "die"; when they succeed, they "kill."
    • 2016 February 23, Tim Gray, “Chris Rock Tests Jokes at Comedy Clubs Ahead of Oscars”, in Variety[5]:
      You really killed it at the Comedy Store last night.
  16. (mathematics, transitive, informal) To cause to assume the value zero.
  17. (computing, Internet, IRC, transitive) To disconnect (a user) involuntarily from the network.
    • Internet definition
      The specific internet consisting of a global network of computers that communicate using Internet Protocol (IP) and that use Border Gateway Protocol (BGP) to identify the best paths to route those communications.
  18. (metallurgy) To deadmelt.
Synonyms
Hyponyms
Derived terms
Related terms
Translations
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Dictionary:Entry layout § Translations.

Noun

kill (plural kills)

  1. The act of killing.
    The assassin liked to make a clean kill, and thus favored small arms over explosives.
  2. Specifically, the death blow.
    The hunter delivered the kill with a pistol shot to the head.
  3. The result of killing; that which has been killed.
    The fox dragged its kill back to its den.
  4. (volleyball) The grounding of the ball on the opponent's court, winning the rally.
    • 2011, the 34th Catawba College Sports Hall of Fame, in Catawba College's Campus Magazine, Spring/Summer 2011, page 21:
      As a senior in 1993, Turner had a kill percentage of 40.8, which was a school record at the time and the best in the SAC. Turner concluded her volleyball career with 1,349 kills, ranking fifth all-time at Catawba.
    • Court definition
      An enclosed space; a courtyard; an uncovered area shut in by the walls of a building, or by different buildings; also, a space opening from a street and nearly surrounded by houses; a blind alley. (1 of 15 court definitions)
Derived terms
Translations

Etymology 2

Borrowing from Dutch kil, from Middle Dutch kille.

Noun

kill (plural kills)

  1. (north-east US) A creek; a body of water; a channel or arm of the sea.
    The channel beyond Staten Island, which connects Newark Bay with Bergen Neck is the Kill van Kull, or the Kills.
    Schuylkill, Catskill, etc.
    • Creek definition
      A small inlet or bay, often saltwater, narrower and extending farther into the land than a cove; a recess in the shore of the sea, or of a river; the inner part of a port that is used as a dock for small boats. (1 of 3 creek definitions)
Translations

Etymology 3

Noun

kill (plural kills)

  1. (rare) Alternative form of kiln
    • 1878, Llewellynn Frederick William Jewitt, The Ceramic Art of Great Britain from Pre-historic Times Down to the Present Day, page 39:
      This very curious and valuable record is as follows, in the handwriting of Conyers and the accompanying engraving is carefully reduced (see Fig. 138 ) from Conyers' own drawing:—“This kill was full of the coarser sorts of potts or cullings, so that few were saved whole, viz., lamps, bottles, urnes, dishes.
    • 1945, Arthur Edwin James, The Potters and Potteries of Chester County, Pennsylvania, page 34:
      The stack of one of the pottery kills is still a visible land mark of this once thriving industry.
    • 1951, Bulletin - Eastern States Archeological Federation, page 11:
      A funerary ceremony comparable to that reported from Kolomoki site is indicated, though no "pottery kill” was located.
    • 2000, Argo - Volume 43, Issue 1, page 59:
      We may indeed assume that cracked and broken ware was discarded in the immediate vicinity of the pottery kills, that is, if it was not thrown in to the Krka.

Cahuilla

Adverb

kíll

  1. Not

German

Pronunciation

Verb

kill

  1. singular imperative of killen
    • Killen definition
      Plural form of kil
  2. (colloquial) first-person singular present of killen

Livonian

Etymology 1

Related to Finnish kylvää.

Alternative forms

  • (Courland) killõ

Verb

kill

  1. sow

Etymology 2

Related to Estonian kõlama.

Alternative forms

  • (Courland) ki'llõ

Verb

kill

  1. ring
  2. make noise

Luxembourgish

Pronunciation

Etymology 1

From Old High German kuoli, from Proto-West Germanic *kōl(ī), from Proto-Germanic *kōlaz. Cognate with German kühl, English cool, Dutch koel, Low German kool.

Adjective

kill (masculine killen, neuter killt, comparative méi kill, superlative am killsten)

  1. cool
Declension
Related terms

Etymology 2

Verb

kill

  1. second-person singular imperative of killen

Ter Sami

Etymology

From Proto-Samic *kielë.

Noun

kill

  1. language

Derived terms

Further reading

  • Koponen, Eino; Ruppel, Klaas; Aapala, Kirsti, editors (2002-2008) Álgu database: Etymological database of the Saami languages[6], Helsinki: Research Institute for the Languages of Finland

Westrobothnian

Etymology

From Old Norse kið

Noun

kill f

  1. female kid (young goat)