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foot

Overview

This page has 35 definitions of foot in English, French, and Middle English. Foot is a noun and verb. Examples of how to use foot in a sentence are shown. Also define these 69 related words and terms: animal, locomotion, organ, leg, anatomy, human, ankle, stand, walk, walking, base, bottom, flat, table, head, projection, unit, measure, inch, third, yard, centimetre, music, pipe, wavelength, octave, middle C, military, infantry, cigar, sewing, sewing machine, printing, type, print, groove, prosody, rhythm, poem, phonology, prosodic, constituent, stress, nautical, sail, billiards, rack, botany, bryophyte, sporophyte, gametophyte, malacology, bivalve, mollusc, gastropod, molecular biology, domain, protein, geometry, footing, kick, ball, pay, tread, association football, football, soccer, fot, and footen.

See also: Foot and Fööt

English

Left foot
Diagram including the foot of a piece of type. a face, b body or shank, c point size, 1 shoulder, 2 nick, 3 groove, 4 foot.

Alternative forms

Etymology

From Middle English fot, fote, foot, from Old English fōt, from Proto-West Germanic *fōt, from Proto-Germanic *fōts, from Proto-Indo-European *pṓds.

Pronunciation

Noun

foot (plural feet)

  1. A biological structure found in many animals that is used for locomotion and that is frequently a separate organ at the terminal part of the leg.
    A spider has eight feet.
  2. (anatomy) Specifically, a human foot, which is found below the ankle and is used for standing and walking.
    Southern Italy is shaped like a foot.
    • Ankle definition
      The skeletal joint which connects the foot with the leg; the uppermost portion of the foot and lowermost portion of the leg, which contain this skeletal joint.
  3. (often used attributively) Travel by walking.
    We went there by foot because we could not afford a taxi.
    There is a lot of foot traffic on this street.
  4. The base or bottom of anything.
    I'll meet you at the foot of the stairs.
    • Base definition
      Something from which other things extend; a foundation.
      1. A supporting, lower or bottom component of a structure or object.
      (1 of 37 base definitions)
  5. The part of a flat surface on which the feet customarily rest.
    We came and stood at the foot of the bed.
  6. The end of a rectangular table opposite the head.
    The host should sit at the foot of the table.
  7. A short foot-like projection on the bottom of an object to support it.
    The feet of the stove hold it a safe distance above the floor.
  8. A unit of measure equal to twelve inches or one third of a yard, equal to exactly 30.48 centimetres.
    • 1963, Margery Allingham, chapter 20, in The China Governess[2]:
      ‘No. I only opened the door a foot and put my head in. The street lamps shine into that room. I could see him. He was all right. Sleeping like a great grampus. Poor, poor chap.’
    The flag pole at the local high school is about 20 feet high.
  9. (music) A unit of measure for organ pipes equal to the wavelength of two octaves above middle C, approximately 328 mm.
    • Middle C definition
      A specific musical note, particularly the note C4, at approximately 261.6 hertz, appearing at the middle of the alto staff and directly between the treble and bass staves. (1 of 2 middle C definitions)
  10. (collective, military) Foot soldiers; infantry.
    King John went to battle with ten thousand foot and one thousand horse.
  11. (cigars) The end of a cigar which is lit, and usually cut before lighting.
  12. (sewing) The part of a sewing machine which presses downward on the fabric, and may also serve to move it forward.
  13. (printing) The bottommost part of a typed or printed page.
    • Print definition
      Of, relating to, or writing for printed publications.
  14. (printing) The base of a piece of type, forming the sides of the groove.
  15. (prosody) The basic measure of rhythm in a poem.
    • Prosody definition
      The study of rhythm, intonation, stress, and related attributes in speech. (1 of 2 prosody definitions)
  16. (phonology) The parsing of syllables into prosodic constituents, which are used to determine the placement of stress in languages along with the notions of constituent heads.
    • Prosodic definition
      Of, or relating to, prosody.
    • Stress definition
      A physical, chemical, infective agent aggressing an organism. (1 of 10 stress definitions)
  17. (nautical) The bottom edge of a sail.
    To make the mainsail fuller in shape, the outhaul is eased to reduce the tension on the foot of the sail.
    • Sail definition
      A piece of fabric attached to a boat and arranged such that it causes the wind to drive the boat along. The sail may be attached to the boat via a combination of mast, spars and ropes. (1 of 12 sail definitions)
  18. (billiards) The end of a billiard or pool table behind the foot point where the balls are racked.
  19. (botany) In a bryophyte, that portion of a sporophyte which remains embedded within and attached to the parent gametophyte plant.
    • 1992, Rudolf M[athias] Schuster, The Hepaticae and Anthocerotae of North America: East of the Hundredth Meridian, volume V, New York, N.Y.: Columbia University Press, →ISBN, page 4:
      (b) sporophyte with foot reduced, the entire sporophyte enveloped by the calyptra, which is ± stipitate at the base.
    • Botany definition
      The scientific study of plants, a branch of biology. Typically those disciplines that involve the whole plant. (1 of 4 botany definitions)
  20. (malacology) The muscular part of a bivalve mollusc or a gastropod by which it moves or holds its position on a surface.
    • Malacology definition
      The study of molluscs.
  21. (molecular biology) The globular lower domain of a protein.
  22. (geometry) The point of intersection of one line with another that is perpendicular to it.
  23. Fundamental principle; basis; plan.
    • 1732, George Berkeley, Alciphron, or the Minute Philosopher
      Answer directly upon the foot of dry reason.
  24. Recognized condition; rank; footing.
    • May 20, 1742, Horace Walpole, letter to Horace Mann
      As to his being on the foot of a servant.
Usage notes
  • (unit of length):
    • The ordinary plural of the unit of measurement is feet, but in many contexts, foot itself may be used ("he is six foot two"). This is a reflex of the Anglo-Saxon (Old English) genitive plural.[1]
    • It is sometimes abbreviated ', such as in tables, lists or drawings.

Synonyms

Derived terms

Coordinate terms

Descendants

Translations

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Dictionary:Entry layout § Translations.

See also

  • pedal, relating to the foot

Verb

foot (third-person singular simple present foots, present participle footing, simple past and past participle footed)

  1. (transitive) To use the foot to kick (usually a ball).
  2. (transitive) To pay (a bill).
  3. To tread to measure of music; to dance; to trip; to skip.
    • 1836, Joanna Baillie, The Phantom, Act 1 (Dramas 2, p.217)
      There's time enough, I hope, To foot a measure with the bonnie bride,
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Dryden to this entry?)
  4. To walk.
  5. To tread.
    to foot the green
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Tickell to this entry?)
  6. (obsolete) To set on foot; to establish; to land.
  7. To renew the foot of (a stocking, etc.).
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Shakespeare to this entry?)
  8. To sum up, as the numbers in a column; sometimes with up.
    to foot (or foot up) an account

Derived terms

Translations

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Dictionary:Entry layout § Translations.

References

  1. ^ Rich Alderson, “Why do we say ‘30 years old’, but ‘a 30-year-old man’?”,[1] in Mark Israel, the alt.usage.english FAQ.

Anagrams


French

Etymology

Clipping of football.

Pronunciation

Noun

foot m (uncountable)

  1. (colloquial) association football; football, soccer
    • Zidane est un des meilleurs joueurs de foot du monde.
      Zidane is one of the best football players in the world.
    • Toutes les semaines, il regarde du foot à la télé.
      Every week, he watches football on TV.

Derived terms


Middle English

Etymology 1

From Old English fōt.

Noun

foot

  1. Alternative form of fot
    • Fot definition
      third-person singular present indicative form of fotre (1 of 2 fot definitions)

Etymology 2

From fot (noun).

Verb

foot

  1. Alternative form of footen