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supplicate definition

Overview

This page has 13 definitions of supplicate in English, Italian, and Latin. Supplicate is a verb and participle. Examples of how to use supplicate in a sentence are shown. Also define these 0 related words and terms: .

English supplicate definition

Etymology

PIE word
*upó

From Late Middle English supplicaten (to request (that someone do something)) [and other forms],[1] borrowed from Latin supplicātus (prayed) + Middle English -en (suffix forming the infinitive of verbs).[2] Supplicātus is the perfect passive participle of supplicō (to pray, supplicate; to beg, humbly beseech), from sup- (variant of sub- (prefix meaning ‘below, beneath, under’)) + plicō (to bend, flex; to fold; to roll up) (ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *pleḱ- (to fold; to plait, weave)).[3]

Pronunciation

Verb

supplicate (third-person singular simple present supplicates, present participle supplicating, simple past and past participle supplicated)

  1. (transitive)
    1. To make a humble request to (someone, especially a person in authority); to beg, to beseech, to entreat.
      Synonyms: implore, obsecrate, petition, plead, (obsolete) pray, sifflicate, (obsolete) thig
      1. (specifically, Oxford University, archaic) Of a member of the university, or an alumnus or alumna of another university seeking a degree ad eundem: to make a formal request (to the university) that an academic degree be awarded to oneself.
        • 1691, [Anthony Wood], “WILLIAM ALLEY”, in Athenæ Oxonienses. An Exact History of All the Writers and Bishops who have had Their Education in the Most Ancient and Famous University of Oxford from the Fifteenth Year of King Henry the Seventh, Dom. 1500, to the End of the Year 1690. [], volume I (Extending to the 16th Year of King Charles I. Dom. 1640), London: [] Tho[mas] Bennet [], OCLC 940079791, column 127:
          In Nov. 1561 he [William Alley] ſupplicated the venerable congregation of Regents of the Univerſity that the Degree of Bach[elor] of Divinity might be conferr'd on him: vvhich being granted, he ſupplicated for that of Doctor; and that being granted alſo, he vvas admitted to them both ſucceſſively, vvithout any mention at all of Incorporation.
      2. (specifically, religion) To make a humble request to (a deity or other spiritual being) in a prayer; to entreat as a supplicant.
        to supplicate the Deity
        • 1664, Tho[mas] Worden, “I Come Now to Speak of the High Priest under the Law, which was a Type of Jesus Christ also”, in The Types Unvailed, or, The Gospel Pick’t Out of the Legal Ceremonies, whereby We may Compare the Substance with the Shadow. [], London: [s.n.], OCLC 10702199, page 233:
          [T]hou maiſt freely lay open thy mind to him [Jesus] in prayer, vvhat ever diſtreſs or vvant thou art in come to him in prayer and thou needſt not fear he vvill vvell knovv vvhat it is thou ſupplicateſt him about; []
        • 1799 October, J. S., “The Dispositions which a Reader of the Holy Scriptures ought to Have, that He may Reap the Fruits of His Studies and Meditations”, in The Aurora; or, The Dawn of Genuine Truth: Being a Repository of Spiritual, Rational, and Useful Knowledge. [], volume I, number VII, London: [] Aurora Press, [], published November 1799, OCLC 1328833057, page 267:
          [I]t is from him only [Jesus] that man hath illumination, which he surely will receive, if in true humiliation of heart he supplicateth Him in the love of truth, and for the sake of living according to what the Divine Truth teacheth; []
    2. To ask or request (something) humbly and sincerely, especially from a person in authority; to beg or entreat for.
      Synonym: solicit
      to supplicate blessings on Christian efforts to spread the gospel
  2. (intransitive)
    1. To humbly request for something, especially to someone in a position of authority; to beg, to beseech, to entreat.
      Synonyms: sifflicate, (obsolete) thig
      1. (specifically, Oxford University) Of a member of the university, or an alumnus or alumna of another university seeking a degree ad eundem: to formally request that an academic degree be awarded to oneself.
        • 1691, [Anthony Wood], “ROBERT TALBOT”, in Athenæ Oxonienses. An Exact History of All the Writers and Bishops who have had Their Education in the Most Ancient and Famous University of Oxford from the Fifteenth Year of King Henry the Seventh, Dom. 1500, to the End of the Year 1690. [], volume I (Extending to the 16th Year of King Charles I. Dom. 1640), London: [] Tho[mas] Bennet [], OCLC 940079791, column 87:
          He [Robert Talbot] vvas educated [] in Logicals and Philoſophicals in New Coll[ege] of vvhich he became Fellovv (after he had ſerved tvvo Years of probation) an[no] 1523. and left it 5 Years after, being then only Bach[elor] of Arts, ſupplicated for the Degree of Maſter 1529, but not admitted, as I can find in the Regiſter of that time.
        • 1691, [Anthony Wood], “Fasti Oxonienses”, in Athenæ Oxonienses. An Exact History of All the Writers and Bishops who have had Their Education in the Most Ancient and Famous University of Oxford from the Fifteenth Year of King Henry the Seventh, Dom. 1500, to the End of the Year 1690. [], volume I (Extending to the 16th Year of King Charles I. Dom. 1640), London: [] Tho[mas] Bennet [], OCLC 940079791, column 642:
          Incorporations, Or ſuch vvho have taken a Degree in another Univerſity, and have been embodied or taken into the boſom of this of Oxon., and have enjoyed the ſame Liberties and Privileges, as if they had taken their Degree here. [] Rich[ard] Kirkby Maſt[er] of Arts of this Univ[ersity] and Bach[elor] of Divin[ity] of the Univ[ersity] of Paris, vvas incorporated Bach. of Div. of this Univerſity.—VVhich being done, he ſupplicated the ſame day to be admitted or licenſed to proceed in Divinity; but vvhether granted it appears not.

Conjugation

Derived terms

Related terms

Translations

References

  1. ^ supplicāten, v.”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007.
  2. ^ -en, suf.(3)”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007.
  3. ^ supplicate, v.”, in OED Online , Oxford, Oxfordshire: Oxford University Press, March 2022; “supplicate, v.”, in Lexico, Dictionary.com; Oxford University Press, 2019–2022.

Further reading


Italian supplicate definition

Etymology 1

Verb

supplicate

  1. inflection of supplicare:
    1. second-person plural present indicative
    2. second-person plural imperative

Etymology 2

Participle

supplicate f pl

  1. feminine plural of supplicato

Latin supplicate definition

Verb

supplicāte

  1. second-person plural present active imperative of supplicō