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stop definition

Overview

This page has 69 definitions of stop with English translations in 14 languages. Stop is a noun, verb, punctuation mark, an adjective and interjection. Examples of how to use stop in a sentence are shown. Also define these 0 related words and terms: .

See also: Stop and stóp

Translingual stop definition

Etymology

From English full stop

Pronunciation

Noun

stop

  1. Code word for a full stop in the NATO/ICAO spelling alphabet

References

  1. ^ Annex 10 to the Convention on International Civil Aviation: Aeronautical Telecommunications; Volume II Communication Procedures including those with PANS status[1], 6th edition, International Civil Aviation Organization, October 2001, retrieved 23 January 2019, page §5.2.1.3, Figure 5–1

English stop definition

Pronunciation

Etymology 1

From Middle English stoppen, stoppien, from Old English stoppian (to stop, close), from Proto-West Germanic *stuppōn, from Proto-Germanic *stuppōną (to stop, close), *stuppijaną (to push, pierce, prick), from Proto-Indo-European *(s)tewp-, *(s)tewb- (to push; stick), from *(s)tew- (to bump; impact; butt; push; beat; strike; hit). Cognate with Saterland Frisian stopje (to stop, block), West Frisian stopje (to stop), Dutch stoppen (to stop), Low German stoppen (to stop), German stopfen (to be filling, stuff), German stoppen (to stop), Danish stoppe (to stop), Swedish stoppa (to stop), Icelandic stoppa (to stop), Middle High German stupfen, stüpfen (to pierce). More at stuff, stump.

Alternate etymology derives Proto-Germanic *stuppōną from an assumed Vulgar Latin *stūpāre, *stuppāre (to stop up with tow), from stūpa, stīpa, stuppa (tow, flax, oakum), from Ancient Greek στύπη (stúpē), στύππη (stúppē, tow, flax, oakum). This derivation, however, is doubtful, as the earliest instances of the Germanic verb do not carry the meaning of "stuff, stop with tow". Rather, these senses developed later in response to influence from similar sounding words in Latin and Romance.[1]

Verb

stop (third-person singular simple present stops, present participle stopping, simple past and past participle stopped)

  1. (intransitive) To cease moving.
    I stopped at the traffic lights.
  2. (intransitive) To not continue.
    The riots stopped when police moved in.
    Soon the rain will stop.
    • 1918, W. B. Maxwell, chapter 5, in The Mirror and the Lamp:
      Then everybody once more knelt, and soon the blessing was pronounced. The choir and the clergy trooped out slowly, […], down the nave to the western door. […] At a seemingly immense distance the surpliced group stopped to say the last prayer.
  3. (transitive) To cause (something) to cease moving or progressing.
    • 2013 June 1, “Ideas coming down the track”, in The Economist, volume 407, number 8838, page 13 (Technology Quarterly):
      A “moving platform” scheme [] is more technologically ambitious than maglev trains even though it relies on conventional rails. [] This set-up solves several problems […]. Stopping high-speed trains wastes energy and time, so why not simply slow them down enough for a moving platform to pull alongside?
    The sight of the armed men stopped him in his tracks.
    This guy is a fraudster. I need to stop the cheque I wrote him.
  4. (transitive) To cease; to no longer continue (doing something).
    One of the wrestlers suddenly stopped fighting.
    Please stop telling me those terrible jokes.
  5. (transitive) To cause (something) to come to an end.
    The referees stopped the fight.
  6. (transitive) To close or block an opening.
    He stopped the wound with gauze.
  7. (transitive, intransitive, photography, often with "up" or "down") To adjust the aperture of a camera lens.
    To achieve maximum depth of field, he stopped down to an f-stop of 22.
  8. (intransitive) To stay; to spend a short time; to reside or tarry temporarily.
    to stop with a friend
    He stopped for two weeks at the inn.
    He stopped at his friend's house before continuing with his drive.
  9. (music) To regulate the sounds of (musical strings, etc.) by pressing them against the fingerboard with the finger, or otherwise shortening the vibrating part.
  10. (obsolete) To punctuate.
  11. (nautical) To make fast; to stopper.
  12. (phonetics, transitive) To pronounce (a phoneme) as a stop.
    th-stopping
Conjugation
Usage notes
Synonyms
Antonyms
Hyponyms
Derived terms
Related terms
Descendants
Translations
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Dictionary:Entry layout § Translations.

Noun

stop (plural stops)

  1. A (usually marked) place where buses, trams or trains halt to let passengers get on and off, usually smaller than a station.
    Related terms: halt, station.
    They agreed to meet at the bus stop.
  2. An action of stopping; interruption of travel.
    That stop was not planned.
  3. That which stops, impedes, or obstructs; an obstacle; an impediment.
    • 1595, Samuel Daniel, “(please specify the folio number)”, in The First Fowre Bookes of the Ciuile Wars between the Two Houses of Lancaster and Yorke, London: [] P[eter] Short for Simon Waterson, OCLC 28470143:
      A fatal stop trauerst their headlong course
    • a. 1729, John Rogers, The Advantages of conversing with good Men
      So melancholy a prospect should inspire us with zeal to oppose some stop to the rising torrent.
  4. A device intended to block the path of a moving object
    door stop
    1. (engineering) A device, or piece, as a pin, block, pawl, etc., for arresting or limiting motion, or for determining the position to which another part shall be brought.
    2. (architecture) A member, plain or moulded, formed of a separate piece and fixed to a jamb, against which a door or window shuts.
  5. (linguistics) A consonant sound in which the passage of air through the mouth is temporarily blocked by the lips, tongue, or glottis.
    Synonyms: plosive, occlusive
  6. A symbol used for purposes of punctuation and representing a pause or separating clauses, particularly a full stop, comma, colon or semicolon.
  7. (music) A knob or pin used to regulate the flow of air in an organ.
    The organ is loudest when all the stops are pulled.
  8. (music) One of the vent-holes in a wind instrument, or the place on the wire of a stringed instrument, by the stopping or pressing of which certain notes are produced.
  9. (tennis) A very short shot which touches the ground close behind the net and is intended to bounce as little as possible.
  10. (soccer) A save; preventing the opposition from scoring a goal
    • 2021 May 15, Phil McNulty, “Chelsea 0-1 Leicester”, in BBC Sport[2]:
      The Foxes were indebted to two crucial saves from keeper Kasper Schmeichel, who turned former Leicester defender Ben Chilwell's header on to a post then produced an even better stop to turn Mason Mount's powerful shot wide.
  11. (zoology) The depression in a dog’s face between the skull and the nasal bones.
    The stop in a bulldog's face is very marked.
  12. (photography) A part of a photographic system that reduces the amount of light.
  13. (photography) A unit of exposure corresponding to a doubling of the brightness of an image.
  14. (photography) An f-stop.
  15. The diaphragm used in optical instruments to cut off the marginal portions of a beam of light passing through lenses.
  16. (fencing) A coup d'arret, or stop thrust.
Derived terms
Translations
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Dictionary:Entry layout § Translations.
References
  1. ^ The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia, "stop".

Punctuation mark

stop

  1. Used to indicate the end of a sentence in a telegram.
Translations

Etymology 2

From Middle English stoppe, from Old English stoppa (bucket, pail, a stop), from Proto-Germanic *stuppô (vat, vessel), from Proto-Indo-European *(s)teub- (to push, hit; stick, stump). Cognate with Norwegian stopp, stoppa (deep well, recess), Middle High German stubech, stübich (barrel, vat, unit of measure) (German Stübchen). Related also to Middle Low German stōp (beaker, flask), Middle High German stouf (beaker, flask), Norwegian staupa (goblet), Icelandic staupa (shot-glass), Old English stēap (a stoup, beaker, drinking vessel, cup, flagon). Cognate to Albanian shtambë (amphora, bucket). See stoup.

Noun

stop (plural stops)

  1. (Britain dialectal) A small well-bucket; a milk-pail.
Translations

Etymology 3

s- +‎ top

Adjective

stop (not comparable)

  1. (physics) Being or relating to the squark that is the superpartner of a top quark.
    • 2016, ATLAS Collaboration, “Search for pair production of gluinos decaying via stop and sbottom in events with b {\displaystyle b} -jets and large missing transverse momentum in p p {\displaystyle pp} collisions at s = 13 {\displaystyle {\sqrt {s}}=13} TeV with the ATLAS detector”, in arXiv[3]:
      For neutralino masses below approximately 700 GeV, gluino masses of less than 1.78 TeV and 1.76 TeV are excluded at the 95% CL in simplified models of the pair production of gluinos decaying via sbottom and stop, respectively.

Anagrams


Danish stop definition

Verb

stop

  1. imperative of stoppe

Dutch stop definition

Pronunciation

Etymology 1

From Middle Dutch stoppe.

Noun

stop m (plural stoppen, diminutive stopje n)

  1. An action of stopping, cessation.
  2. A plug for a sink, a stopper.
  3. An electric fuse.
    Synonyms: smeltstop, zekering
Derived terms

Etymology 2

See the etymology of the main entry.

Verb

stop

  1. first-person singular present indicative of stoppen
  2. imperative of stoppen

Anagrams


Finnish stop definition

Interjection

stop

  1. stop (halt)
  2. stop (end-of-sentence indicator in telegrams)

Synonyms


French stop definition

Etymology

1792. Borrowed from English stop.

Pronunciation

Interjection

stop!

  1. stop!

Noun

stop m (uncountable)

  1. stop sign
  2. hitchhiking

Derived terms

Descendants

Further reading

Anagrams


Hungarian stop definition

Etymology

Borrowed from English stop.

Pronunciation

Interjection

stop

  1. halt! stop!

Punctuation

stop

  1. stop (used to indicate the end of a sentence in a telegram)

Noun

stop (plural stopok)

  1. (colloquial) stop sign (a red sign on the side of a street instructing vehicles to stop)
    Nem állt meg a stopnál.He ran the stop sign.
  2. (colloquial) hitchhike (an act of hitchhiking, trying to get a ride in a passing vehicle while standing at the side of a road)

Declension

Inflection (stem in -o-, back harmony)
singular plural
nominative stop stopok
accusative stopot stopokat
dative stopnak stopoknak
instrumental stoppal stopokkal
causal-final stopért stopokért
translative stoppá stopokká
terminative stopig stopokig
essive-formal stopként stopokként
essive-modal
inessive stopban stopokban
superessive stopon stopokon
adessive stopnál stopoknál
illative stopba stopokba
sublative stopra stopokra
allative stophoz stopokhoz
elative stopból stopokból
delative stopról stopokról
ablative stoptól stopoktól
non-attributive
possessive - singular
stopé stopoké
non-attributive
possessive - plural
stopéi stopokéi
Possessive forms of stop
possessor single possession multiple possessions
1st person sing. stopom stopjaim
2nd person sing. stopod stopjaid
3rd person sing. stopja stopjai
1st person plural stopunk stopjaink
2nd person plural stopotok stopjaitok
3rd person plural stopjuk stopjaik

Derived terms


Irish stop definition

Etymology

Borrowed from English stop, from Middle English stoppen, from Old English stoppian (to stop, close), from Proto-Germanic *stuppōną (to stop, close).

Pronunciation

Verb

stop (present analytic stopann, future analytic stopfaidh, verbal noun stopadh, past participle stoptha)

  1. to stop

Conjugation

Synonyms

Noun

stop m (genitive singular stop, nominative plural stopanna)

  1. a stop (place to get on and off line buses or trams; interruption of travel; device to block path)

Declension

Synonyms

Further reading


Italian stop definition

Etymology

Borrowed from English stop.

Interjection

stop

  1. stop!, halt!

Noun

stop m

  1. stop (roadsign; bus stop etc; block)

Anagrams


Latvian stop definition

Etymology

Borrowed from English stop.

Interjection

stop!

  1. stop!, halt!

Polish stop definition

Pronunciation

Etymology 1

Deverbal of stopić.

Noun

stop m inan

  1. (chemistry) an alloy; a mixture of metals.
    Mosiądz jest stopem miedzi i cynku.Brass is an alloy of copper and zinc.
Declension
Synonyms

Verb

stop

  1. second-person singular imperative of stopić

Etymology 2

Borrowed from English stop.

Interjection

stop

  1. stop!, halt!

Noun

stop m inan

  1. a stop sign.
    Jechał dalej, bo nie zauważył stopu.
    He continued to drive because he hadn't noticed the stop sign.
  2. (colloquial) a vehicle's brake light.
    Uderzyłam w niego, bo nie zaświecił mu się stop i nie wiedziałam, że ostro hamuje.
    I hit his car because his brake light didn't flash and I didn't know he was braking hard.
  3. (colloquial) hitchhiking.
    Często podróżuję na stopa.
    I often hitchhike.

Further reading

  • stop in Wielki słownik języka polskiego, Instytut Języka Polskiego PAN
  • stop in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Portuguese stop definition

Etymology

Borrowed from English stop.

Pronunciation

Noun

stop m (plural stops)

  1. stop (function or button that causes a device to stop operating)
  2. (uncountable) A game in which the players write on paper one word from each category (animal, fruit, etc.), all beginning with the same letter, as quickly as possible. In Spanish: tutti frutti.
    Synonym: adedanha
  3. (stock market) stop loss order (order to close one’s position if the market drops to a specified price level)
  4. (Brazil, upper-class slang) stop; end (the act of putting a stop to something)
    Precisamos dar um stop na nossa preguiça.
    We need to put an end to our laziness.

Interjection

stop!

  1. Said by a player of the game of stop to cease the current turn, after which the players count how many words they wrote.

See also

  • CEP (acronym of "cidade, estado, país", meaning "city, state, country", a category in the game of stop)

Further reading


Romanian stop definition

Etymology

From French stop.

Noun

stop n (uncountable)

  1. stop

Declension


Spanish stop definition

Etymology

Borrowed from English stop.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /esˈtop/, [esˈt̪op]

Interjection

stop

  1. stop

Swedish stop definition

Noun

stop n

  1. beer mug.
  2. stoup

Declension

Declension of stop 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative stop stopet stop stopen
Genitive stops stopets stops stopens

Synonyms

Anagrams