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slang

Overview

This page has 38 definitions of slang with English translations in 15 languages. Slang is a noun, verb and adjective. Examples of how to use slang in a sentence are shown. Also define these 36 related words and terms: conventional, informal, register, unique, profession, subject, jargon, language, cant, abuse, sling, promontory, fetter, leg, convict, counterfeit, weight, measure, hawker, license, watchchain, sell, snake, serpent, twang, foreign, accent, regional, usage, slang, slange, Serpentes, reptiel, hose, tube, and pipe.

See also: Slang and släng

English

Pronunciation

Etymology 1

1756, meaning "special vocabulary of tramps or thieves", origin unknown. Possibly derived from a North Germanic source, related to Norwegian Nynorsk slengenamn (nickname), slengja kjeften (to abuse verbally, literally to sling one's jaw), related to Icelandic slengja (to sling, throw, hurl), Old Norse slyngva (to sling). Not believed to be connected with language or lingo.

Noun

slang (countable and uncountable, plural slangs)

  1. Language outside of conventional usage and in the informal register.
    • 1996, James Lambert, The Macquarie Book of Slang, Sydney: Macquarie Library, page v:
      English-speaking Australians have always had a love affair with slang.
  2. Language that is unique to a particular profession or subject; jargon.
    • Profession definition
      A declaration of belief, faith or one's opinion, whether genuine or pretended. (1 of 4 profession definitions)
  3. The specialized language of a social group, sometimes used to make what is said unintelligible to those not members of the group; cant.
    • 1871, George Eliot [pseudonym; Mary Ann Evans], chapter XI, in Middlemarch: A Study of Provincial Life, volume I, Edinburgh; London: William Blackwood and Sons, OCLC 948783829, book I (Miss Brooke), page 172:
      "Oh, there are so many superior teas and sugars now. Superior is getting to be shopkeepers' slang. / "Are you beginning to dislike slang, then?" said Rosamond, with mild gravity. / "Only the wrong sort. All choice of words is slang. It marks a class." / "There is correct English: that is not slang." / "I beg your pardon: correct English is the slang of prigs who write history and essays. And the strongest slang of all is the slang of poets."
  4. (countable) A particular variety of slang; the slang used by a particular group.
  5. (countable) An item of slang; a slang word or expression.
  6. (India) A curse word
Synonyms
Derived terms
Descendants
Translations
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Dictionary:Entry layout § Translations.

Verb

slang (third-person singular simple present slangs, present participle slanging, simple past and past participle slanged)

  1. (transitive, dated) To vocally abuse, or shout at.
    • 1888, Rudyard Kipling, “Miss Youghal's Sais”, Plain Tales from the Hills, Folio Society 2007, p. 26,
      Also, he had to keep his temper when he was slanged in the theatre porch by a policeman.
    • 1907, E.M. Forster, The Longest Journey, Part I, XII [Uniform ed., p. 130]:
      Stephen feared that he would yell louder, and was hostile. But they made friends and treated each other, and slanged the proprietor and ragged the pretty girls …
    • 1912, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, The Lost World[1]:
      "If they had been a row of his favorite Pressmen he could not have slanged them worse."
See also

Etymology 2

Verb

slang

  1. (archaic) simple past tense of sling
    • 1836, Edward Bagnall, Saul and David:
      Before he slang the all-deciding stone []

Etymology 3

Alternative forms

Noun

slang (plural slangs)

  1. (Britain, dialect) Any long, narrow piece of land; a promontory.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Holland to this entry?)

Etymology 4

Compare sling.

Noun

slang (plural slangs)

  1. (Britain, obsolete) A fetter worn on the leg by a convict.
  2. (Britain, obsolete, slang) A counterfeit weight or measure.
    • Weight definition
      The force on an object due to the gravitational attraction between it and the Earth (or whatever astronomical object it is primarily influenced by). (1 of 21 weight definitions)
  3. (Britain, obsolete, slang) A travelling show, or one of its performances.
  4. (Britain, obsolete, slang) A hawker's license.
  5. (Britain, obsolete, slang) A watchchain.
    • Watchchain definition
      A chain attached to a watch.

Further reading

Etymology 5

The same as sling which is also used in this sense. The vowel exhibits the lowering of /ɪ/ before /ŋ/ distinguishing for African American Vernacular English, as in thang for thing, but the word has spread with this pronunciation outside the accents that exhibit this feature.

Verb

slang (third-person singular simple present slangs, present participle slanging, simple past and past participle slanged)

  1. (transitive, African-American Vernacular, MLE) To sell (especially illegal drugs).
    • 2014, Cdai (lyrics), “Bail Out”, performed by RondoNumbaNine ft. Cdai:
      Everyday I wake up gotta get back to the gwop
      Just another fuckin day in that gangway slangin rocks
    • 2016, TG Millian (lyrics), “Call Me A Spartan”, performed by Harlem Spartans (Blanco, Zico, Bis, TG Millian, MizorMac):
      Whip, whip in the trap do up kitchen that's food (that's food)
      Cookin up grub
      Fuck, these niggas cookin up soup (uhhhhh)
      Slang the crack or the black
      Put the light and dark on the move
      Gold and brown and cute
      Gyal love me and I love them too (too)
    • 2017, Digga D (lyrics), “Next Up?”, performed by 1011 (Digga D x Sav'O x T.Y):
      Bro I’m booky, I’ll take your food if my belly starts rumbling
      They rap about bootings, they ain’t blammed nobody
      Hold that properly when I bang that dotty
      I put sniff in a rex, and I slang that bobby
    Synonym: sling

Anagrams


Afrikaans

Etymology

From Dutch slang (snake, serpent), from Middle Dutch slange (snake, serpent), from Old Dutch slango (snake, serpent), from Proto-Germanic *slangô (snake, serpent).

Pronunciation

Noun

slang (plural slange)

  1. snake; serpent
    • 1983, E. P. Groenewald et al. (translators), Bybel, Genesis 3:2:
      Die vrou het die slang geantwoord: “Ons mag eet van die vrugte van die bome in die tuin.
      The woman answered the serpent: “We may eat of the fruit of the trees in the garden.

Related terms


Cebuano

Etymology

Borrowed from English slang. A misnomer.

Noun

slang

  1. (colloquial, informal) twang, foreign accent
    • Foreign definition
      Located outside a country or place, especially one's own. (1 of 9 foreign definitions)

Adjective

slang

  1. (colloquial, informal) (usually of English speakers) Having a regional or foreign accent.

Czech

Noun

slang m

  1. slang

Danish

Etymology 1

Borrowed from English slang.

Noun

slang c (singular definite slangen or slanget, not used in plural form)

  1. Language outside of conventional usage, slang.
Inflection
Derived terms

Etymology 2

See slange.

Verb

slang

  1. imperative of slange
    • Slange definition
      plural of slang

Dutch

Etymology 1

From Middle Dutch slange, from Old Dutch slango, from Proto-Germanic *slangô (snake, serpent).

Pronunciation

Noun

slang f (plural slangen, diminutive slangetje n)

  1. snake, squamate of the suborder Serpentes
    Synonym: serpent
    Hypernym: reptiel
    • Reptiel definition
      reptile, any member of the class Reptilia
  2. hose (flexible tube)
Hyponyms
Derived terms
 
Descendants
  • Afrikaans: slang
  • Berbice Creole Dutch: slanggi
  • Negerhollands: slang, slaṅ
  • Skepi Creole Dutch: slanka
  • Indonesian: slang (hose)
  • Papiamentu: slan

Etymology 2

Borrowed from English slang.

Pronunciation

Noun

slang n (plural slangs, diminutive slangetje n)

  1. language outside the conventional register specific to a social group, slang

Anagrams


French

Etymology

From English slang

Pronunciation

Noun

slang m (plural slangs)

  1. English slang
    Twain fut un des premiers auteurs provenant des terres intérieures des États-Unis qui a su capturer la distinction, le slang comique et l'iconoclasme de sa nation.

See also

Further reading


Indonesian

Pronunciation

Etymology 1

From Dutch slang (snake, hose), from Middle Dutch slange, from Old Dutch slango, from Proto-Germanic *slangô (snake, serpent).

Noun

slang (first-person possessive slangku, second-person possessive slangmu, third-person possessive slangnya)

  1. hose (flexible tube).

Etymology 2

From English slang.

Noun

slang (first-person possessive slangku, second-person possessive slangmu, third-person possessive slangnya)

  1. (linguistic) slang, unconventional language.

Further reading


Limburgish

Etymology 1

From Dutch slang.

Pronunciation

Noun

slang f

  1. hose (flexible tube)
Inflection

This entry needs an inflection-table template.

Etymology 2

Borrowed from English slang.

Pronunciation

Noun

slang f

  1. slang
Inflection

This entry needs an inflection-table template.


Norwegian Bokmål

Etymology 1

From English slang

Noun

slang m (definite singular slangen)

  1. slang (non-standard informal language)
Related terms

Etymology 2

Verb

slang

  1. imperative of slange

References


Norwegian Nynorsk

Etymology

From English slang

Noun

slang m (definite singular slangen)

  1. slang (non-standard informal language)

Related terms

References


Polish

Etymology

From English slang.

Pronunciation

Noun

slang m inan

  1. slang (jargon or cant)

Declension

Derived terms

  • slangowy
  • slangowo

Further reading

  • slang in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Romanian

Etymology

Borrowed from English slang.

Pronunciation

Noun

slang n (plural slanguri)

  1. slang

Declension

Synonyms

  • argou

Swedish

Noun

slang c

  1. hose, tube, flexible pipe
  2. (uncountable) slang (language)

Declension

Declension of slang 1
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative slang slangen slangar slangarna
Genitive slangs slangens slangars slangarnas
Declension of slang 2
Uncountable
Indefinite Definite
Nominative slang slangen
Genitive slangs slangens

Anagrams


Tagalog

Noun

slang

  1. (colloquial, informal) A thick foreign accent in English.
    Ayos ka mag-Ingles a, parang Kano, slang na slang!
    That's some English diction you have, like an American, with their accent!

West Frisian

Etymology

From Old Frisian *slanga, from Proto-Germanic *slangô.

Pronunciation

Noun

slang c (plural slangen, diminutive slankje)

  1. snake

Alternative forms

Further reading

  • slang”, in Wurdboek fan de Fryske taal (in Dutch), 2011