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set definition

Overview

This page has 159 definitions of set with English translations in 26 languages. Set is a verb, noun, an adjective, numeral and conjunction. Examples of how to use set in a sentence are shown. Also define these 0 related words and terms: .

English set definition

Pronunciation

Etymology 1

From Middle English setten, from Old English settan, from Proto-West Germanic *sattjan, from Proto-Germanic *satjaną, from Proto-Indo-European *sodéyeti, causative of *sed- (to sit).

Verb

set (third-person singular simple present sets, present participle setting, simple past set, past participle set or (dialectal) setten)

  1. (transitive) To put (something) down, to rest.
    Synonyms: put, lay, set down
    Antonym: pick up
    Set the tray there.
  2. (transitive) To attach or affix (something) to something else, or in or upon a certain place.
    I have set my heart on running the marathon.
  3. (transitive) To put in a specified condition or state; to cause to be.
  4. (transitive) To start (a fire).
    Synonym: light
    Antonyms: extinguish, put out, quench
  5. (transitive, dated) To cause to stop or stick; to obstruct; to fasten to a spot.
    to set a coach in the mud
  6. (transitive) To determine or settle.
    to set the rent
  7. (transitive) To adjust.
    I set the alarm at 6 a.m.
    (i.e. I programmed it at that hour to go off at a later time)
    I set the alarm for 6 a.m.
    (i.e. I programmed it earlier to go off at that hour.)
  8. (transitive) To punch (a nail) into wood so that its head is below the surface.
  9. (transitive) To arrange with dishes and cutlery, to set the table.
    Please set the table for our guests.
  10. (transitive) To introduce or describe.
    • 1749, Henry Fielding, chapter II, in The History of Tom Jones, a Foundling, volume (please specify |volume=I to VI), London: A[ndrew] Millar [], OCLC 928184292, book III:
      An incident which happened about this time will set the characters of these two lads more fairly before the discerning reader than is in the power of the longest dissertation.
    I’ll tell you what happened, but first let me set the scene.
  11. (transitive) To locate (a play, etc.); to assign a backdrop to, geographically or temporally.
    He says he will set his next film in France.
    Her debut novel is set during the U.S. Civil War.
  12. (transitive) To compile, to make (a puzzle or challenge).
    This crossword was set by Araucaria.
  13. (transitive) To prepare (a stage or film set).
  14. (transitive) To fit (someone) up in a situation.
  15. (transitive) To arrange (type).
    It was a complex page, but he set it quickly.
  16. (transitive) To devise and assign (work) to.
    • 2013 July 19, Peter Wilby, “Finland spreads word on schools”, in The Guardian Weekly, volume 189, number 6, page 30:
      Imagine a country where children do nothing but play until they start compulsory schooling at age seven. Then, without exception, they attend comprehensives until the age of 16. Charging school fees is illegal, and so is sorting pupils into ability groups by streaming or setting.
    The teacher set her students the task of drawing a foot.
  17. (transitive, volleyball) To direct (the ball) to a teammate for an attack.
  18. (intransitive) To solidify.
    The glue sets in five minutes.
  19. (transitive) To render stiff or solid; especially, to convert into curd; to curdle.
    to set milk for cheese
  20. (intransitive) Of a heavenly body, to disappear below the horizon of a planet, etc, as the latter rotates.
    The moon sets at eight o'clock tonight.
  21. (transitive, bridge) To defeat a contract.
  22. (obsolete, now followed by "out", as in set out) To begin to move; to go forth.
  23. (transitive, botany) To produce after pollination.
    • 2012, Daniel Chamovitz, What a Plant Knows, p. 155
      Many fruit trees will only flower and set fruit following a cold winter.
    to set seed
  24. (intransitive, of fruit) To be fixed for growth; to strike root; to begin to germinate or form.
    • 1906, Canada. Dept. of Agriculture. Fruit Branch, Fruit crop report
      In the Annapolis Valley, in spite of an irregular bloom, the fruit has set well and has, as yet, been little affected by scab.
  25. (intransitive, Southern US, Midwestern US, dialects) To sit (be in a seated position).
    • 1913, Joseph C. Lincoln, chapter 7, in Mr. Pratt's Patients:
      Old Applegate, in the stern, just set and looked at me, and Lord James, amidship, waved both arms and kept hollering for help. I took a couple of everlasting big strokes and managed to grab hold of the skiff's rail, close to the stern.
    • 1987, Toni Morrison, Beloved, page 227:
      And if Mrs. Garner didn't need me right there in the kitchen, I could get a chair and you and me could set out there while I did the vegetables.
    He sets in that chair all day.
  26. To hunt game with the aid of a setter.
  27. (hunting, transitive, intransitive) Of a dog, to indicate the position of game.
    The dog sets the bird.
    Your dog sets well.
  28. To apply oneself; to undertake earnestly.
    • 1654, H[enry] Hammond, Of Fundamentals in a Notion Referring to Practise, London: [] J[ames] Flesher for Richard Royston, [], OCLC 228724047:
      If he set industriously and sincerely to perform the commands of Christ, he can have no ground of doubting but it shall prove successful to him.
  29. (transitive, intransitive) To fit music to words.
  30. (transitive, intransitive) To place plants or shoots in the ground; to plant.
    to set pear trees in an orchard
    • 1774, John Robinson, Thomas Rispin, A Journey Through Nova-Scotia Containing a Particular Account of the Country and its Inhabitants, York: C. Etherington, page 19:
      Mr. Forster, from Newcastle, made a purchase here last year. We saw him with eight men setting potatoes within a week of mid-summer.
  31. To become fixed or rigid; to be fastened.
  32. To have a certain direction of motion; to flow; to move on; to tend.
    The current sets to the north; the tide sets to the windward.
  33. (intransitive, country dancing) To acknowledge a dancing partner by facing him or her and moving first to one side and then to the other, while she or he does the opposite.
    Set to partners! was the next instruction from the caller.
  34. To place or fix in a setting.
    to set a precious stone in a border of metal
    to set glass in a sash
    • 1681, John Dryden, The Spanish Fryar: Or, the Double Discovery. [], London: [] Richard Tonson and Jacob Tonson, [], OCLC 6484883, Act IV, page 58:
      And him too rich a jewel to be set / In vulgar metal for a vulgar use.
  35. To put in order in a particular manner; to prepare.
    to set (that is, to hone) a razor
    to set a saw
  36. To extend and bring into position; to spread.
    to set the sails of a ship
  37. To give a pitch to, as a tune; to start by fixing the keynote.
  38. To reduce from a dislocated or fractured state.
    to set a broken bone
  39. (masonry) To lower into place and fix solidly, as the blocks of cut stone in a structure.
  40. (obsolete) To wager in gambling; to risk.
  41. To adorn with something infixed or affixed; to stud; to variegate with objects placed here and there.
  42. (obsolete) To value; to rate; used with at.
  43. To establish as a rule; to furnish; to prescribe; to assign.
    to set a good example
  44. (Scotland) To suit; to become.
    It sets him ill.
Synonyms
  • (of heavenly bodies, to disappear below the horizon): go down, go west
Derived terms
Terms derived from set (verb)
Translations
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Dictionary:Entry layout § Translations.

Etymology 2

From Middle English set, sette, from Old English set (seat, place of residence, camp, settlement, entrenchment, stable, pen), from Proto-West Germanic *set (seat), from Proto-Germanic *setą (seat).

Noun

set (plural sets)

  1. A punch for setting nails in wood.
    nail set
  2. A device for receiving broadcast radio waves (or, more recently, broadcast data); a radio or television.
    television set
  3. Alternative form of sett: a hole made and lived in by a badger.
  4. Alternative form of sett: pattern of threads and yarns.
  5. Alternative form of sett: piece of quarried stone.
  6. (horticulture) A small tuber or bulb used instead of seed, particularly onion sets and potato sets.
  7. The amount the teeth of a saw protrude to the side in order to create the kerf.
  8. (obsolete, rare) That which is staked; a wager; hence, a gambling game.
  9. (engineering) A permanent change of shape caused by excessive strain, as from compression, tension, bending, twisting, etc.
    the set of a spring
    • 1986 March 29, National Transportation Safety Board, “1.12 Wreckage and Impact Information”, in Aircraft Accident Report: China Airlines Boeing 747-SP, N4522V, 300 Nautical Miles Northwest of San Francisco, California, February 19, 1985[1], archived from the original on 10 July 2022, retrieved 10 July 2022, page 12:
      The wings were bent or set permanently 2 to 3 inches upward at the wingtips; however, the set was within the manufacturer's allowable tolerances.
  10. A bias of mind; an attitude or pattern of behaviour.
  11. (piledriving) A piece placed temporarily upon the head of a pile when the latter cannot otherwise be reached by the weight, or hammer.
  12. (printing, dated) The width of the body of a type.
  13. A young oyster when first attached.
  14. Collectively, the crop of young oysters in any locality.
  15. A series or group of something. (Note the similar meaning in Etymology 4, Noun)
  16. (colloquial) The manner, state, or quality of setting or fitting; fit.
    the set of a coat
  17. The pattern of a tartan, etc.
  18. The camber of a curved roofing tile.
  19. The full number of eggs set under a hen.
Translations
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Dictionary:Entry layout § Translations.

Etymology 3

From Middle English sett, from Old English ġesett, past participle of settan.

Adjective

set (comparative more set, superlative most set)

  1. Fixed in position.
    • 2013 July 19, Ian Sample, “Irregular bedtimes may affect children's brains”, in The Guardian Weekly, volume 189, number 6, page 34:
      Irregular bedtimes may disrupt healthy brain development in young children, according to a study of intelligence and sleeping habits.  ¶ Going to bed at a different time each night affected girls more than boys, but both fared worse on mental tasks than children who had a set bedtime, researchers found.
  2. Rigid, solidified.
  3. Ready, prepared.
  4. Intent, determined (to do something).
    set on getting to his destination
  5. Prearranged.
    a set menua meal that is instituted by a restaurateur for a limited occasion
    a set booka required reading for a course in an educational institution
  6. Fixed in one’s opinion.
    I’m set against the idea of smacking children to punish them.
  7. (of hair) Fixed in a certain style.
Synonyms
Translations
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Dictionary:Entry layout § Translations.
Derived terms
Terms derived from Etymology 1

Etymology 4

From Middle English set, sete, sette (that which is set, the act of setting, seat), from Old English set (setting, seat, a place where people remain, habitation, camp, entrenchment, a place where animals are kept, stall, fold) and Old English seten (a set, shoot, slip, branch; a nursery, plantation; that which is planted or set; a cultivated place; planting, cultivation; a setting, putting; a stopping; occupied land), related to Old English settan (to set). Compare Middle Low German gesette (a set, suite), Old English gesetl (assembly). According to Skeat, in senses denoting a group of things or persons, representing an alteration of sept, from Old French sette (a religious sect), from Medieval Latin secta (retinue), from Latin secta (a faction). See sect. It is quite possible that the modern word is more of a merger between both, however.

Noun

set (plural sets)

  1. A young plant fit for setting out; a slip; shoot.
  2. A rudimentary fruit.
  3. The setting of the sun or other luminary; (by extension) the close of the day.
  4. (literally and figuratively) General movement; direction; drift; tendency.
    • 1840, Thomas De Quincey, Style
      Here and there, amongst individuals alive to the particular evils of the age, and watching the very set of the current, there may have been even a more systematic counteraction applied to the mischief.
    • 1951, Herman Wouk, The Caine Mutiny, page 238:
      He put his eye to the alidade. “I thought so! Zero five four and that's allowing nothing for set and drift along the line of bearing. We're inside the departure point now []
  5. A matching collection of similar things. (Note the similar meaning in Etymology 1, Noun.)
    a set of tables
  6. A collection of various objects for a particular purpose.
    a set of tools
  7. An object made up of several parts.
    a set of steps
  8. (set theory) A collection of zero or more objects, possibly infinite in size, and disregarding any order or repetition of the objects which may be contained within it.
  9. (in plural, “sets”, mathematics, informal) Set theory.
  10. A group of people, usually meeting socially.
    the country set
  11. The scenery for a film or play.
  12. the general locations and area where a movie’s, a film’s, or a video’s scenery is arranged to be filmed also including places for actors, assorted crew, director, producers which are typically not filmed.
  13. (dance) The initial or basic formation of dancers.
  14. (exercise) A group of repetitions of a single exercise performed one after the other without rest.
    • 1974, Charles Gaines & George Butler, Pumping Iron: The Art and Sport of Bodybuilding, page 22.
      This is the fourth set of benchpresses.
  15. (tennis) A complete series of games, forming part of a match.
  16. (volleyball) A complete series of points, forming part of a match.
  17. (volleyball) The act of directing the ball to a teammate for an attack.
  18. (music) A musical performance by a band, disc jockey, etc., consisting of several musical pieces.
    • 2017 June 26, Alexis Petridis, “Glastonbury 2017 verdict: Radiohead, Foo Fighters, Lorde, Stormzy and more”, in the Guardian[2]:
      You heard “oh, Jeremy Corbyn” everywhere: at the silent disco, during Radiohead’s Friday night headlining set, midway through the Other stage appearance by rapper Stormzy, who gamely joined in.
  19. (music) A drum kit, a drum set.
    He plays the set on Saturdays.
  20. (UK, education) A class group in a subject where pupils are divided by ability.
    • 2012 April 26, “Themes: Pupil grouping and organisation of classes”, in (Please provide the book title or journal name)[3], Department for Education:
      Looking at pupil attainment, the study found that students with the same Key Stage 3 scores could have their GCSE grade raised or lowered by up to half a grade as a result of being placed in a higher or lower set.
  21. (poker, slang) Three of a kind, especially if two cards are in one's hand and the third is on the board. Compare trips (three of a kind, especially with two cards on the board and one in one's hand).[1]
Synonyms
Hypernyms
(set theory) Hypernyms of set
Derived terms
terms derived from Etymology 2 of set "grouping" (noun)
Translations

Etymology 5

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Verb

set (third-person singular simple present sets, present participle setting, simple past and past participle setted)

  1. (UK, education) To divide a class group in a subject according to ability
    • 2008, Patricia Murphy, Robert McCormick, Knowledge and Practice: Representations and Identities
      In setted classes, students are brought together because they are believed to be of similar 'ability'. Yet, setted lessons are often conducted as though students are not only similar, but identical—in terms of ability, preferred learning style and pace of working.
    • 2002, Jo Boaler, Experiencing School Mathematics: Traditional and Reform Approaches and Their Impact on Student Learning:
      At Amber Hill, setting was a high-profile concept, and the students were frequently reminded of the set to which they belonged.

References

  1. ^ Weisenberg, Michael (2000) The Official Dictionary of Poker. MGI/Mike Caro University. →ISBN

Anagrams


Afrikaans set definition

Pronunciation

Noun

set (plural )

  1. The name of the Latin-script letter Z.

Aragonese set definition

Etymology

From Latin sitis.

Noun

set f

  1. thirst

Catalan set definition

Etymology 1

Catalan numbers (edit)
70
 ←  6 7 8  → [a], [b]
    Cardinal: set
    Ordinal (Central): setè
    Ordinal (Valencian): seté
    Ordinal (Latinate): sèptim
    Ordinal abbreviation (Central):
    Ordinal abbreviation (Valencian):
    Ordinal abbreviation (Latinate): 7m
    Multiplier: sèptuple
Catalan Wikipedia article on 7

From Latin septem (seven), from Proto-Indo-European *septḿ̥. Cognates include Occitan sèt.

Pronunciation

Numeral

set m or f

  1. (cardinal number) seven

Noun

set m (plural sets)

  1. seven

Derived terms

Etymology 2

From Latin sitis, from Proto-Indo-European *dʰgʷʰítis.

Pronunciation

Noun

set f (plural sets)

  1. thirst
  2. hunger (strong desire)
Derived terms

Further reading


Chinese set definition

Etymology

From English set.

Pronunciation


Noun

set

  1. (Hong Kong Cantonese) package or a collection of items (Classifier: c)

Verb

set

  1. (Hong Kong Cantonese) to adjust
    set鬧鐘 / set闹钟 [Cantonese]  ―  set naau6 zung1 [Jyutping]  ―  to set the alarm
  2. (Hong Kong Cantonese) to prepare
    set / set [Cantonese]  ―  set1 coeng4 [Jyutping]  ―  to prepare and decorate a venue

Classifier

set

  1. (Hong Kong Cantonese) Classifier for packages or collections of items.

Crimean Tatar set definition

Noun

set

  1. sofa, couch, settee

Czech set definition

Pronunciation

Etymology 1

From English set.

Noun

set m

  1. (tennis, volleyball) set (part of a match in sports like tennis and volleyball)
    Synonym: sada
Declension

Etymology 2

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Noun

set n

  1. genitive plural of sto

Verb

set

  1. masculine singular passive participle of sít

Further reading

  • set in Příruční slovník jazyka českého, 1935–1957
  • set in Slovník spisovného jazyka českého, 1960–1971, 1989

Danish set definition

Verb

set

  1. past participle of se

Derived terms

  • sådan set

Dutch set definition

Etymology

Borrowed from English set.

Pronunciation

Noun

set m (plural sets, diminutive setje n)

  1. A set (collection of objects belonging together).
  2. A set (installation consisting of multiple appliances).
  3. (tennis) A set (tennis match).
  4. A film set (filming location).
    Synonym: filmset

Derived terms


Eastern Durango Nahuatl set definition

Noun

set

  1. ice

French set definition

Pronunciation

Noun

set m (plural sets)

  1. (tennis) set
    Synonym: manche

Derived terms

Further reading

Anagrams


Indonesian set definition

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈsɛt]
  • Hyphenation: sèt

Etymology 1

From Dutch set, from English set, alteration of sept, from Old French sette (a religious sect), from Medieval Latin secta (retinue), from Latin secta (a faction).

Noun

sèt (first-person possessive setku, second-person possessive setmu, third-person possessive setnya)

  1. (sports) set, group of games counting as a unit toward a match.
    Synonym: babak
  2. set:
    Synonyms: perangkat, setel
    1. a matching collection of similar things.
    2. a collection of various objects for a particular purpose.
  3. set, an object made up of several parts.
Derived terms
  • set adegan
  • set dalam
  • set kedua
  • set kepala
  • set panjang
  • set penentuan
  • set sayap panggung
  • set tambahan
  • set tangan
  • set tirai
 

Etymology 2

From English set, from Middle English setten, from Old English settan, from Proto-Germanic *satjaną, from Proto-Indo-European *sodéyeti, causative of *sed- (to sit).

Verb

sèt

  1. to set:
    Synonym: mengeset
    1. to put in a specified condition or state
    2. to adjust
    3. to prepare
    4. to arrange
Derived terms
  • mengeset
  • pengeset
  • pengesetan
 

Noun

set (first-person possessive setku, second-person possessive setmu, third-person possessive setnya)

  1. (colloquial) trick; act; strategy
    Synonyms: muslihat, tindak, strategi

Further reading


Italian set definition

Etymology

Borrowed from English set.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈsɛt/
  • Rhymes: -ɛt
  • Hyphenation: sèt

Noun

set m (invariable)

  1. set (group of things in maths, tennis, cinema, etc.)

Anagrams


Ladin set definition

Ladin cardinal numbers
 <  6 7 8  > 
    Cardinal : set
    Ordinal : setim

Etymology

From Latin septem.

Adjective

set

  1. seven

Noun

set m (uncountable)

  1. seven

Latin set definition

Pronunciation

Conjunction

set

  1. Alternative form of sed
    • c. 1300, Tractatus de Ponderibus et Mensuris
      sexies viginti petre faciunt carrum plumbi scilicet magnum carrum London’ set carrus del Peek est multo minus.
      Six times twenty stone make the load of lead, scilicet the great London load, but the load of Peek is much less.

Lombard set definition

Alternative forms

Etymology

From Latin septem.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /set/, [sɛt]
  • IPA(key): /set/, [hɛt] (High Brescian and Bergamasque)

Numeral

set

  1. seven.

Lower Sorbian set definition

Pronunciation

Verb

set

  1. supine of seś

Mauritian Creole set definition

Mauritian Creole cardinal numbers
 <  6 7 8  > 
    Cardinal : set
    Ordinal : setiem

Etymology

From French sept.

Numeral

set

  1. seven

Michif set definition

Etymology

From French sept.

Pronunciation

Numeral

set

  1. seven

Norwegian Nynorsk set definition

Etymology 1

Verb

set

  1. present tense of setja, setje, setta and sette
  2. imperative of setja and setje

Etymology 2

Verb

set

  1. (non-standard since 1938) past participle of sjå

Occitan set definition

Etymology

From Latin sitis, from Proto-Indo-European *dʰgʷʰítis.

Pronunciation

Noun

set f or m (plural sets)

  1. thirst

Numeral

Occitan cardinal numbers
 <  6 7 8  > 
    Cardinal : set

set (Limousin)

  1. seven

Alternative forms

Derived terms

Further reading

  • Joan de Cantalausa (2006) Diccionari general occitan a partir dels parlars lengadocians, 2 edition, →ISBN, page 910.

Old English set definition

Etymology

Compare the verb settan. Compare Old Norse sæti, Old High German gesazi (German Gesäß), Middle Dutch gesaete, from Proto-Germanic *sētiją.

Pronunciation

Noun

set n

  1. seat

Declension

This noun needs an inflection-table template.

Related terms


Old French set definition

Etymology 1

From Latin septem.

Pronunciation

Numeral

cardinal number
7 Previous: sis
Next: uit

set

  1. seven
Descendants

Etymology 2

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Verb

set

  1. third-person singular present indicative of savoir
Descendants

Papiamentu set definition

Etymology

From Spanish sed and Portuguese sede and Kabuverdianu sedi.

Noun

set

  1. thirst

Piedmontese set definition

Piedmontese cardinal numbers
 <  6 7 8  > 
    Cardinal : set

Etymology

From Latin septem, from Proto-Italic *septem. Cognates include Italian sette and French sept.

Pronunciation

Numeral

set

  1. seven

Polish set definition

Pronunciation

Etymology 1

Borrowed from English set.

Noun

set m inan

  1. (badminton, tennis, volleyball) set (part of the game in badminton, tennis, or volleyball)
Declension

Etymology 2

Noun

set f

  1. genitive plural of seta

Further reading

  • set in Wielki słownik języka polskiego, Instytut Języka Polskiego PAN
  • set in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Portuguese set definition

Etymology

Unadapted borrowing from English set.

Pronunciation

Noun

set m (plural sets)

  1. set (group of things in maths, tennis, cinema, etc.)

Romanian set definition

Etymology

From English set or French set.

Pronunciation

Noun

set n (plural seturi)

  1. (tennis) set
  2. set (of objects)

Declension


Romansch set definition

Etymology 1

From Latin septem, from Proto-Indo-European *septḿ̥.

Number

set

  1. (Rumantsch Grischun, Surmiran, Puter, Vallader) seven
Alternative forms

Etymology 2

From Latin sitis, from Proto-Indo-European *dʰgʷʰítis (perishing, decrease).

Noun

set f

  1. (Sutsilvan) thirst
Alternative forms
  • (Rumantsch Grischun, Puter, Vallader) said
  • (Sursilvan) seit
  • (Surmiran) seid

Spanish set definition

Etymology

Borrowed from English set.

Pronunciation

Noun

set m (plural sets)

  1. (tennis) set

Further reading


Swedish set definition

Etymology

Borrowed from English set.

Pronunciation

Noun

set n

  1. a set (matching collection of items)
  2. a set (in tennis)

Declension

Declension of set 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative set setet set seten
Genitive sets setets sets setens

See also

Anagrams


Walloon set definition

Etymology

From Latin septem, from Proto-Indo-European *septḿ̥.

Pronunciation

IPA(key): /sɛt/

Numeral

set

  1. seven

Welsh set definition

Verb

set (not mutable)

  1. Contraction of baset.

Westrobothnian set definition

Etymology

From Old Norse sæti, from Proto-Germanic *sētiją. Confer the English seat.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [sèːt]
    Rhymes: -èːt

Noun

set n (definite singular sete, definite plural seta)

  1. seat, bench
  2. haycock

Derived terms

Verb

set (preterite seett, supine sett)

  1. to cock hay

Yola set definition

Etymology

From Middle English sette.

Noun

set

  1. set
    • 1867, GLOSSARY OF THE DIALECT OF FORTH AND BARGY:
      Houghany set.
      Stupid set.

References

  • Jacob Poole (1867), William Barnes, editor, A Glossary, With some Pieces of Verse, of the old Dialect of the English Colony in the Baronies of Forth and Bargy, County of Wexford, Ireland, London: J. Russell Smith, page 47