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place definition

Overview

This page has 68 definitions of place with English translations in 9 languages. Place is a noun and verb. Examples of how to use place in a sentence are shown. Also define these 0 related words and terms: .

English place definition

Alternative forms

  • pleace (some English dialects: 18th–19th centuries; Scots: until the 17th century)

Pronunciation

Etymology 1

From Middle English place, conflation of Old English plæse, plætse, plæċe (place, an open space, street) and Old French place (place, an open space), both from Latin platea (plaza, wide street), from Ancient Greek πλατεῖα (plateîa), shortening of πλατεῖα ὁδός (plateîa hodós, broad way), from Proto-Indo-European *pleth₂- (to spread), extended form of *pleh₂- (flat). Displaced native Old English stōw. Compare also English pleck (plot of ground), West Frisian plak (place, spot, location), Dutch plek (place, spot, patch). Doublet of piatza, piazza, and plaza.

Noun

place (plural places)

  1. (physical) An area; somewhere within an area.
    1. An open space, particularly a city square, market square, or courtyard.
    2. (often in street names or addresses) A street, sometimes but not always surrounding a public place, square, or plaza of the same name.
      They live at Westminster Place.
    3. An inhabited area: a village, town, or city.
    4. Any area of the earth: a region.
      He is going back to his native place on vacation.
      • 1918, W[illiam] B[abington] Maxwell, chapter XXII, in The Mirror and the Lamp, Indianapolis, Ind.: The Bobbs-Merrill Company, OCLC 4293071:
        From another point of view, it was a place without a soul. The well-to-do had hearts of stone; the rich were brutally bumptious; the Press, the Municipality, all the public men, were ridiculously, vaingloriously self-satisfied.
    5. The area one occupies, particularly somewhere to sit.
      We asked the restaurant to give us a table with three places.
    6. The area where one lives: one's home, formerly (chiefly) country estates and farms.
      • 1853, Charles Dickens, Bleak House, ch 2:
        My Lady Dedlock has been down at what she calls, in familiar conversation, her "place" in Lincolnshire.
      Do you want to come over to my place later?
    7. An area of the skin.
    8. (euphemistic slang) An area to urinate and defecate: an outhouse or lavatory.
    9. (obsolete) An area to fight: a battlefield or the contested ground in a battle.
  2. A location or position in space.
    • c. 1595–1596 (date written), William Shakespeare, “A Midsommer Nights Dreame”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies: Published According to the True Originall Copies (First Folio), London: [] Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, OCLC 606515358, [Act II, scene v]:
      In that same place thou hast appointed me,
      To-morrow truly will I meete with thee.
    • 1667, John Milton, “Book II”, in Paradise Lost. [], London: [] [Samuel Simmons], [], OCLC 228722708; republished as Paradise Lost in Ten Books: [], London: Basil Montagu Pickering [], 1873, OCLC 230729554:
      What place can be for us / Within heaven's bound?
    • 1913, Joseph C. Lincoln, chapter 5, in Mr. Pratt's Patients:
      When you're well enough off so's you don't have to fret about anything but your heft or your diseases you begin to get queer, I suppose. And the queerer the cure for those ailings the bigger the attraction. A place like the Right Livers' Rest was bound to draw freaks, same as molasses draws flies.
    • 1935, George Goodchild, chapter 5, in Death on the Centre Court:
      By one o'clock the place was choc-a-bloc. […] The restaurant was packed, and the promenade between the two main courts and the subsidiary courts was thronged with healthy-looking youngish people, drawn to the Mecca of tennis from all parts of the country.
  3. A particular location in a book or document, particularly the current location of a reader.
  4. (obsolete) A passage or extract from a book or document.
  5. (obsolete, rhetoric) A topic.
  6. A frame of mind.
    I'm in a strange place at the moment.
  7. (chess, obsolete) A chess position; a square of the chessboard.
  8. (social) A responsibility or position in an organization.
    1. A role or purpose; a station.
      It is really not my place to say what is right and wrong in this case.
    2. The position of a contestant in a competition.
      We thought we would win but only ended up in fourth place.
    3. (horse-racing) The position of first, second, or third at the finish, especially the second position.
      to win a bet on a horse for place
    4. The position as a member of a sports team.
      He lost his place in the national team.
  9. (obsolete) A fortified position: a fortress, citadel, or walled town.
  10. Numerically, the column counting a certain quantity.
    three decimal places;  the hundreds place
  11. Ordinal relation; position in the order of proceeding.
    That's what I said in the first place!
    • a. 1788, Mather Byles, quoted in The Life of James Otis by William Tudor
      In the first place, I do not understand politics; in the second place, you all do, every man and mother's son of you; in the third place, you have politics all the week, pray let one day in the seven be devoted to religion []
  12. Reception; effect; implying the making room for.
Synonyms
Hyponyms
Derived terms
Related terms
Descendants
Translations
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Dictionary:Entry layout § Translations.

Etymology 2

From Middle English placen, from the noun (see above).

Verb

place (third-person singular simple present places, present participle placing, simple past and past participle placed)

  1. (transitive) To put (an object or person) in a specific location.
    • 1963, Margery Allingham, chapter 19, in The China Governess[1]:
      Meanwhile Nanny Broome was recovering from her initial panic and seemed anxious to make up for any kudos she might have lost, by exerting her personality to the utmost. She took the policeman's helmet and placed it on a chair, and unfolded his tunic to shake it and fold it up again for him.
    • 2013 May-June, Charles T. Ambrose, “Alzheimer’s Disease”, in American Scientist, volume 101, number 3, page 200:
      Similar studies of rats have employed four different intracranial resorbable, slow sustained release systems— […]. Such a slow-release device containing angiogenic factors could be placed on the pia mater covering the cerebral cortex and tested in persons with senile dementia in long term studies.
    He placed the glass on the table.
  2. (intransitive) To earn a given spot in a competition.
    The Cowboys placed third in the league.
    1. (intransitive, racing) To finish second, especially of horses or dogs.
      In the third race: Aces Up won, paying eight dollars; Blarney Stone placed, paying three dollars; and Cinnamon showed, paying five dollars.
  3. (transitive) To remember where and when (an object or person) has been previously encountered.
    I've seen him before, but I can't quite place where.
  4. (transitive, passive) To achieve (a certain position, often followed by an ordinal) as in a horse race.
    Run Ragged was placed fourth in the race.
  5. (transitive) To sing (a note) with the correct pitch.
  6. (transitive) To arrange for or to make (a bet).
    I placed ten dollars on the Lakers beating the Bulls.
  7. (transitive) To establish a call (connection by telephone or similar).
    • 2021, Vindman, Alexander S., “Impeachable Offense”, in Here, Right Matters: An American Story[2], HarperCollins, →ISBN, OCLC 1261635035:
      We were all focused intently on the triangular conference call speaker in the middle of the table. President Trump's communications team was placing a call to President Volodymyr Zelenksy of Ukraine, and we were here to listen.
  8. (transitive) To recruit or match an appropriate person for a job, or a home for an animal for adoption, etc.
    They phoned hoping to place her in the management team.
  9. (sports, transitive) To place-kick (a goal).
Conjugation
Synonyms
  • (to earn a given spot):
  • (to put in a specific location): deposit, lay, lay down, put down
  • (to remember where and when something or someone was previously encountered):
  • (passive, to achieve a certain position): achieve, make
  • (to sing (a note) with the correct pitch): reach
  • (to arrange for, make (a bet)):
  • (to recruit or match an appropriate person):
Derived terms
Translations
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Dictionary:Entry layout § Translations.

Anagrams


Czech place definition

Alternative forms

  • placu (locative singular)

Pronunciation

Noun

place

  1. vocative/locative singular of plac

Anagrams


French place definition

Pronunciation

Etymology 1

From Old French place, from Latin platea, from Ancient Greek πλατεῖα (plateîa).

Noun

place f (plural places)

  1. place, square, plaza, piazza
  2. place, space, room
  3. place, seat
Derived terms
Descendants

Etymology 2

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Verb

place

  1. inflection of placer:
    1. first/third-person singular present indicative/subjunctive
    2. second-person singular imperative

Further reading

Anagrams


Interlingua place definition

Verb

place

  1. present of placer
  2. imperative of placer

Latin place definition

Verb

placē

  1. second-person singular present active imperative of placeō

Middle English place definition

Etymology 1

From Old English plætse, plæse, plæċe and Old French place, both from Latin platea, from Ancient Greek πλατεῖα (plateîa).

Alternative forms

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈplaːs(ə)/, /ˈplas(ə)/

Noun

place (plural places)

  1. A place, area or spot; a part of the Earth or universe:
    1. An inhabited place (such as a country, town etc.)
    2. A battlefield; a location of fighting.
    3. An estate or property; a house or building (often with its surrounds).
    4. (rare) A city square, market square, or courtyard.
  2. A location or position in or on a larger space (occupied by something or someone):
    1. An area of the body (either of an organ or of the skin)
    2. A location in or passage from a written document.
    3. (mathematics) The place of a digit in a number written with Arabic numerals.
  3. A place, station, or position; an appropriate or designated spot:
    1. The usual location or place of something (e.g. an animal's dwelling).
    2. A position in a hierarchy; rank, status, or level.
    3. A favourable or propitious occasion; an opportunity.
  4. Extent, space (in two or three dimensions)
Related terms
Descendants
References

Etymology 2

Noun

place

  1. Alternative form of playce

Old French place definition

Alternative forms

Etymology

From Latin platea.

Noun

place f (oblique plural places, nominative singular place, nominative plural places)

  1. place; location

Descendants

References


Polish place definition

Pronunciation

Noun

place m inan

  1. nominative/accusative/vocative plural of plac

Romanian place definition

Pronunciation

Verb

place

  1. inflection of plăcea:
    1. second-person singular imperative
    2. third-person singular present indicative
    Îți place de el?Do you like him?

Spanish place definition

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): (Spain) /ˈplaθe/, [ˈpla.θe]
  • IPA(key): (Latin America) /ˈplase/, [ˈpla.se]

Verb

place

  1. inflection of placer:
    1. third-person singular present indicative
    2. second-person singular imperative