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lum

Overview

This page has 13 definitions of lum with English translations in 5 languages. Lum is a noun, an adjective and romanization. Also define these 21 related words and terms: chimney, top, part, folk, mining, ventilate, shaft, mine, grove, wood, woody, valley, deep, pool, riverbed, river, lucky, light, snow, warm, and 𒈝.

See also: lúm and -lum

English

Pronunciation

Etymology 1

Borrowed from Scots lum, Early Scots lumb;[1] further etymology uncertain, possibly from Old French lum (light) (compare French lumière (light; cavity or channel within a tube or tubular organ, lumen; opening)), from Latin lūmen (light; light source; opening through which light can penetrate such as an air-hole or window; opening or orifice in a water-pipe or funnel),[2][3][4] ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *lewk- (bright; to see; to shine). The word is possibly also related to Welsh llumon (chimney) (obsolete).[2]

Noun

lum (plural lums) (Northern England, Scotland)

  1. A chimney; also, the top part of a chimney.
    • 1768, Alexander Ross, “Canto I”, in The Fortunate Shepherdess, a Pastoral Tale; in Three Cantos, in the Scotish Dialect. [], Aberdeen, Aberdeenshire: [] Francis Douglas, OCLC 220556128, page 50:
      Now, by this time, the ſun begins to leam, / An' litt the hill-heads, wi' his morning beam, / An' birds, and beaſts, and fouk to be aſteer, / And ſtreams o' reek frae lumb heads to appear; []
    • 1785 (date written), Robert Burns, “Halloween”, in Poems, Chiefly in the Scottish Dialect. [], volume I, 2nd edition, Edinburgh: [] T[homas] Cadell, [], and William Creech, [], published 1793, OCLC 860627146, stanza VIII, page 178:
      He bleez'd ovvre her, an' ſhe ovvre him, / As they vvad never mair part, / Till, fuff! he ſtarted up the lum, / An' Jean had e'en a ſair heart / To ſee't that night.
    • 1818 July 25, Jedadiah Cleishbotham [pseudonym; Walter Scott], chapter II, in Tales of My Landlord, Second Series, [] (The Heart of Mid-Lothian), volume III, Edinburgh: [] [James Ballantyne and Co.] for Archibald Constable and Company, OCLC 819902302, page 32:
      Sae, I wad not trust mysell with another look at poor Woodend, for the very blue reek that came out of the lum-head pat me in mind of the change of market-days with us.
    • 1865 March, [Robert Williams Buchanan], “Willie Baird: A Winter Idyll”, in The Cornhill Magazine, volume XI, number 63, London: Smith, Elder & Co., [], OCLC 561748243, page 361:
      Down the broad lum / Came melting flakes that hiss'd upon the coal; / Under my eyelids blew the blinding smoke, / And for a time I sat like one bewitch'd, / Still as a stone.
    • 1877, G. S. L. [pseudonym; George Sinclair of Leith], chapter VI, in Shetland Fireside Tales; or, The Hermit of Trosswickness, Edinburgh: Edinburgh Publishing Company; London: Simpkin, Marshall, & Co., OCLC 624998711, page 41:
      Two "lums" on the ridge served the double purpose of letting out the smoke and in the light. [] A new peat fire had been put on, and the day being calm, the lazy smoke seemed more inclined to remain inside than to go out the lums, as it ought to have done.
    • [1880], [George Jacque], “Weepie with Other Boys Fulfil Their Appointment”, in The Sweep’s Apprentice. [], Edinburgh: Religious Book and Tract Society of Scotland, [], OCLC 774523665, page 18:
      "I heard a boy there speak of soot. Where is soot to be had?" / "Up lums, said Weepie, laughing. / [] / "But why not let it stay in the lums?" / "'Cause it wad come doon and splairge the parritch and the broth, and maybe set the lum on fire."
    • 1933 July, Lewis Grassic Gibbon [pseudonym; James Leslie Mitchell], “Cirrus”, in Cloud Howe, London: Jarrolds Publishers [], OCLC 895074007, page 30:
      And out they would tramp, young Ewan in bed, the night black under their feet as cold pitch, about them the whistle and moan of trees till they cleared the Manse and went up by the Mains, with the smell of the dung from its hot cattle-court, and the smell of the burning wood in its lums.
    1. (specifically, mining) A ventilating chimney over the shaft of a mine.
    • Top definition
      The highest or uppermost part of something. (1 of 30 top definitions)
    • Mine definition
      That which belongs to me.
      1. Used predicatively. (1 of 5 mine definitions)
Alternative forms
Derived terms
Translations

Etymology 2

Origin uncertain; perhaps related to Old Norse lundr (clump of trees, grove; (rare) tree) (compare Danish lund (grove), Norwegian Bokmål lund, Norwegian Nynorsk lund (grove), Swedish lund (grove)).[5]

Noun

lum (plural lums)

  1. (Northern England, Scotland, dialectal) A grove or wood; also, a woody valley.
    • Wood definition
      The substance making up the central part of the trunk and branches of a tree. Used as a material for construction, to manufacture various items, etc. or as fuel. (1 of 8 wood definitions)

Etymology 3

Origin unknown.[6]

Noun

lum (plural lums)

  1. (Northern England, Scotland, dialectal) A deep pool, especially one in a riverbed.
    • 1830 September 4, W. H. H., “The ‘Lums’ of Westmoreland”, in The Mirror of Literature, Amusement, and Instruction, volume XVI, number 449, London: [] J[ohn] Limbird, [], OCLC 728650805, page 188, column 2:
      The Kettle Wells are two lums, situated in Bonson's Wood, near Stanmore, which are not surpassed for Elysian beauty. The fall of the water into the first well is inconsiderable; but that continually empties itself into the lum below, over a smooth precipice of thirty feet.
    • Pool definition
      A small and rather deep area of (usually) fresh water, as one supplied by a spring, or occurring in the course of a stream or river; a reservoir for water. (1 of 7 pool definitions)
    • Riverbed definition
      The path where a river runs, or where a river once ran; the bottom earthen part of a river, not including the riverbanks.
Alternative forms

References

  1. ^ lum, n.1, v.1”, in The Dictionary of the Scots Language, Edinburgh: Scottish Language Dictionaries, 2004–, OCLC 57069714, reproduced from W[illiam] Grant and D[avid] D. Murison, editors, The Scottish National Dictionary, Edinburgh: Scottish National Dictionary Association, 1931–1976, →OCLC.
  2. 2.0 2.1 lum, n.”, in OED Online , Oxford, Oxfordshire: Oxford University Press, March 2022.
  3. ^ lum, n.”, in Dictionary.com Unabridged, Dictionary.com, LLC, 1995–present, reproduced from Collins English Dictionary, 10th edition, London: Collins, 2010, →ISBN.
  4. ^ Compare Joseph Wright, editor (1902), “LUM, sb.1”, in The English Dialect Dictionary: [], volume III (H–L), London: Henry Frowde, [], publisher to the English Dialect Society, []; New York, N.Y.: G. P. Putnam’s Sons, OCLC 81937840, page 689, column 1.
  5. ^ Joseph Wright, editor (1902), “LUM, sb.3”, in The English Dialect Dictionary: [], volume III (H–L), London: Henry Frowde, [], publisher to the English Dialect Society, []; New York, N.Y.: G. P. Putnam’s Sons, OCLC 81937840, page 689, column 2.
  6. ^ Compare Joseph Wright, editor (1902), “LUM, sb.2”, in The English Dialect Dictionary: [], volume III (H–L), London: Henry Frowde, [], publisher to the English Dialect Society, []; New York, N.Y.: G. P. Putnam’s Sons, OCLC 81937840, page 689, column 2; “lumb, n.2”, in OED Online , Oxford, Oxfordshire: Oxford University Press, March 2022.

Further reading

Anagrams


Albanian

Etymology

Variant of standard lumë.

Noun

lum m (indefinite plural lumenj, definite singular lumi, definite plural lumenjtë)

  1. river
    • River definition
      A large and often winding stream which drains a land mass, carrying water down from higher areas to a lower point, oftentimes ending in another body of water, such as an ocean or in an inland sea. (1 of 5 river definitions)

Adjective

lum

  1. lucky

Ladin

Noun

lum f (plural lumes)

  1. (Gherdëina) light

Livonian

Etymology

From Proto-Finnic *lumi.

Noun

lum

  1. snow

Declension


Mizo

Etymology

From Proto-Kuki-Chin *lum, from Proto-Sino-Tibetan *s-l(u/i)m.

Adjective

lum

  1. warm

References

  • Grammar and Dictionary of the Lushai Language by J.H. Lorrain, Shillong 1898

Occitan

Etymology

From Old Occitan [Term?], from Latin lūmen, from Proto-Indo-European *léwksmn̥, derived from the root *lewk- (bright).

Pronunciation

Noun

lum m (plural lums)

  1. light
  2. light source, such as a lamp or bulb

See also


Scots

Etymology

Origin uncertain; perhaps compare obsolete Welsh llumon (chimney).

Noun

lum (plural lums)

  1. chimney

Sumerian

Romanization

lum

  1. Romanization of 𒈝 (lum)
    • 𒈝 definition
      excrement