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look

Overview

This page has 34 definitions of look with English translations in 8 languages. Look is a verb, interjection and noun. Examples of how to use look in a sentence are shown. Also define these 44 related words and terms: try, see, pay attention, eyes, glance, appear, seem, copular verb, search, find, express, manifest, seek, baseball, look at, action, attempt, appearance, visual, impression, facial, expression, look, physical, style, outfit, Allium, garlic, chive, shallot, leek, singular, past tense, indicative mood, luiken, gap, barrel, rope, section, division, bay, baiya, middle, and part.

See also: löök and Look

English

Etymology

From Middle English loken, lokien, from Old English lōcian, from Proto-West Germanic *lōkōn. Further origin unknown, no certain cognates outside Germanic.[1] The English word, however, is cognate with Scots luke, luik, leuk (to look, see), West Frisian lôkje, loaitsje (to look), Dutch loeken (to look), German Low German löken, Alemannic German luege (to look), German lugen (to look), Yiddish לוגן(lugn). Possibly related to Sanskrit लोक् (lok, to see, behold) (from Proto-Indo-European *lewk- (light) in the sense of "illuminating" (cf. related word रुच् (ruc) "to shine, illuminate")).[2]

Pronunciation

Verb

look (third-person singular simple present looks, present participle looking, simple past and past participle looked)

  1. To try to see, to pay attention to with one’s eyes.
    Synonyms: see Thesaurus:look
    1. (intransitive) As an intransitive verb, often with "at".
      Troponyms: glance; see also Thesaurus:stare
      They kept looking at me.
      Don’t look in the closet.
      • 1897 December (indicated as 1898), Winston Churchill, chapter V, in The Celebrity: An Episode, New York, N.Y.: The Macmillan Company; London: Macmillan & Co., Ltd., OCLC 222716698:
        Then came a maid with hand-bag and shawls, and after her a tall young lady. [] She looked around expectantly, and recognizing Mrs. Cooke's maid [] Miss Thorn greeted her with a smile which greatly prepossessed us in her favor.
      • 1918, W[illiam] B[abington] Maxwell, chapter X, in The Mirror and the Lamp, Indianapolis, Ind.: The Bobbs-Merrill Company, OCLC 4293071:
        He looked round the poor room, at the distempered walls, and the bad engravings in meretricious frames, the crinkly paper and wax flowers on the chiffonier; and he thought of a room like Father Bryan's, with panelling, with cut glass, with tulips in silver pots, such a room as he had hoped to have for his own.
      • 1968, Ray Thomas (lyrics and music), “Legend of a Mind”, in In Search of the Lost Chord, performed by The Moody Blues:
        Timothy Leary's dead. / No, no no no, he's outside, looking in.
    2. (transitive, colloquial) As a transitive verb, often in the imperative; chiefly takes relative clause as direct object.
      Look what you did to him!
      Look who's back!
  2. To appear, to seem.
    It looks as if it’s going to rain soon.
    • c. 1701–03, Joseph Addison, Remarks on Several Parts of Italy, &c., Dedication:
      THERE is a pleaſure in owning obligations which it is a pleaſure to have received; but ſhould I publiſh any favours done me by your Lordſhip, I am afraid it would look more like vanity, than gratitude.
    • 1908, W[illiam] B[lair] M[orton] Ferguson, chapter IV, in Zollenstein, New York, N.Y.: D. Appleton & Company, OCLC 731476803:
      So this was my future home, I thought! [] Backed by towering hills, the but faintly discernible purple line of the French boundary off to the southwest, a sky of palest Gobelin flecked with fat, fleecy little clouds, it in truth looked a dear little city; the city of one's dreams.
    • 1963, Margery Allingham, chapter 2, in The China Governess[1]:
      Now that she had rested and had fed from the luncheon tray Mrs. Broome had just removed, she had reverted to her normal gaiety.  She looked cool in a grey tailored cotton dress with a terracotta scarf and shoes and her hair a black silk helmet.
    • 2012, Chelsea 6-0 Wolves
      Chelsea's youngsters, who looked lively throughout, then combined for the second goal in the seventh minute. Romeu's shot was saved by Wolves goalkeeper Dorus De Vries but Piazon kept the ball alive and turned it back for an unmarked Bertrand to blast home.
    • Appear definition
      To come or be in sight; to be in view; to become visible. (1 of 6 appear definitions)
  3. (copulative) To give an appearance of being.
    That painting looks nice.
    • 1843, Thomas Carlyle, Past and Present, book 2, chapter 6, Monk Samson:
      Once, slipping the money clandestinely, just in the act of taking leave, he slipt it not into her hand but on the floor, and another had it; whereupon the poor Monk, coming to know it, looked mere despair for some days [].
  4. (intransitive, often with "for") To search for, to try to find.
    • Find definition
      To encounter or discover by accident; to happen upon. (1 of 13 find definitions)
  5. To face or present a view.
    The hotel looks over the valleys of the HinduKush.
    • 1769, Benjamin Blayney (editor), King James Bible, Oxford standard text, Ezekiel, xi, 1,
      Moreover the spirit lifted me up, and brought me unto the east gate of the LORD's house, which looketh eastward:
  6. To expect or anticipate.
    I look to each hour for my lover’s arrival.
  7. (transitive) To express or manifest by a look.
    • c. 1815, Lord Byron, Waterloo,
      Soft eyes looked love to eyes which spake again,
    • Express definition
      Moving or operating quickly, as a train not making local stops. (1 of 4 express definitions)
  8. (transitive, often with "to") To make sure of, to see to.
    • 1898, Samuel Butler (translator), Homer, The Odyssey,
      "Look to it yourself, father," answered Telemachus, "for they say you are the wisest counsellor in the world, and that there is no other mortal man who can compare with you. []
  9. (dated, sometimes figuratively) To show oneself in looking.
    Look out of the window [i.e. lean out] while I speak to you.
  10. (transitive, obsolete) To look at; to turn the eyes toward.
    • 1910, Emerson Hough, chapter I, in The Purchase Price: Or The Cause of Compromise, Indianapolis, Ind.: The Bobbs-Merrill Company, OCLC 639762314:
      Serene, smiling, enigmatic, she faced him with no fear whatever showing in her dark eyes. [] She put back a truant curl from her forehead where it had sought egress to the world, and looked him full in the face now, [].
  11. (transitive, obsolete) To seek; to search for.
    • c. 1552–1599, Edmund Spenser, unidentified sonnet,
      Looking my love, I go from place to place, / Like a young fawn that late hath lost the hind; / And seek each where, where last I saw her face, / Whose image yet I carry fresh in mind.
  12. (transitive, obsolete) To influence, overawe, or subdue by looks or presence.
    to look down opposition
    • 1692, John Dryden, Cleomenes the Spartan Hero, a Tragedy, Act 3, Scene 1, 1701, The Comedies, Tragedies, and Operas Written by John Dryden, Esq, Volume 2, page 464,
      A Spirit fit to start into an Empire, / And look the World to Law.
    • 1882, Wilkie Collins, Heart and Science
      Ovid might have evaded her entreaties by means of an excuse. But her eyes were irresistible: they looked him into submission in an instant.
  13. (baseball) To look at a pitch as a batter without swinging at it.
    The fastball caught him looking.
    Clem Labine struck Mays out looking at his last at bat.
    It's unusual for Mays to strike out looking. He usually takes a cut at it.
    • Baseball definition
      A sport common in North America, the Caribbean, and Japan, in which the object is to strike a ball so that one of a nine-person team can run counter-clockwise among four bases, resulting in the scoring of a run. The team with the most runs after termination of play, usually nine innings, wins. (1 of 3 baseball definitions)

Usage notes

Though the use of the pronunciation /luːk/ is now restricted to northern English dialects, it was formerly more widespread. For example, it is mentioned without comment in Walker's Critical Pronouncing Dictionary.[3]

Conjugation

Derived terms

phrasal verbs derived from look (verb)
other terms derived from look (verb)

Translations

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Dictionary:Entry layout § Translations.

Interjection

look

  1. Pay attention.
    Look, I'm going to explain what to do, so you have to listen closely.

Translations

Synonyms

Noun

look (plural looks)

  1. The action of looking; an attempt to see.
    Let’s have a look under the hood of the car.
  2. (often plural) Physical appearance, visual impression.
    She got her mother’s looks.
    I don’t like the look of the new design.
    • 1909, Archibald Marshall [pseudonym; Arthur Hammond Marshall], chapter I, in The Squire’s Daughter, New York, N.Y.: Dodd, Mead and Company, published 1919, OCLC 491297620:
      He tried to persuade Cicely to stay away from the ball-room for a fourth dance. [] But she said she must go back, and when they joined the crowd again her partner was haled off with a frightened look to the royal circle, []
  3. A facial expression.
    He gave me a dirty look.
    If looks could kill ...

Derived terms

Descendants

Translations

References

  1. ^ Philippa, Marlies; Debrabandere, Frans; Quak, Arend; Schoonheim, Tanneke; van der Sijs, Nicoline (2003–2009), “look”, in Etymologisch woordenboek van het Nederlands (in Dutch), Amsterdam: Amsterdam University Press
  2. ^ Monier Williams (1899), “look”, in A Sanskrit–English Dictionary, [], new edition, Oxford: At the Clarendon Press, OCLC 458052227, page 906.
  3. ^ Look” in John Walker, A Critical Pronouncing Dictionary [] , London: Sold by G. G. J. and J. Robinſon, Paternoſter Row; and T. Cadell, in the Strand, 1791, →OCLC, page 329, column 2.

Anagrams


Chinese

Etymology

From English look.

Pronunciation

Noun

look

  1. (Hong Kong Cantonese) look; physical appearance; visual impression; style; outfit

Dutch

Etymology 1

From Middle Dutch look, from Old Dutch *lōk, from Proto-Germanic *laukaz. Compare Low German look, Look, German Lauch, English leek, Danish løg, Swedish lök. More at leek.

Pronunciation

Noun

look n or m (uncountable)

  1. Plants of the genus Allium, especially garlic.
  2. Several related herbs, like chive, garlic, shallot and leek.
Derived terms
  • lookachtig
  • lookallergie
  • lookbed
  • lookgeur
  • looksaus
  • looksmaak
  • looksoep
  • lookstank
  • lookworst

-plant species:

  • bieslook (chives)
  • berglook (keeled garlic)
  • daslook (bear leek)
  • eslook (shallot)
  • knoflook (garlic)
  • kraailook (crow garlic)
  • lookprei
  • look-zonder-look
  • moeslook (field garlic)

Etymology 2

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Pronunciation

Verb

look

  1. singular past indicative of luiken
    • Luiken definition
      to close, to shut

Etymology 3

Borrowed from English look.

Pronunciation

Noun

look m (plural looks)

  1. A look, (clothing) style, appearance.
Derived terms
  • horrorlook

Etymology 4

Related to luiken, cognate with English lock.

Noun

look m (plural loken, diminutive )

  1. A gap, space between barrels or between the strings in rope.
    • Gap definition
      An opening in anything made by breaking or parting. (1 of 12 gap definitions)
    • Barrel definition
      A round vessel or cask, of greater length than breadth, and bulging in the middle, made of staves bound with hoops, and having flat ends or heads. Sometimes applied to a similar cylindrical container made of metal, usually called a drum. (1 of 15 barrel definitions)
  2. A section, division (archaic).

Anagrams


French

Etymology

Borrowed from English look.

Pronunciation

Noun

look m (plural looks)

  1. a style; appearance; look
    Je trouve que son nouveau look ne lui va pas du tout.I think his new look doesn't suit him at all.

Derived terms


Portuguese

Etymology

Unadapted borrowing from English look.

Pronunciation

Noun

look m (plural looks)

  1. (informal) outfit; look, style (a set of clothing with accessories, usually special clothes)

Romanian

Etymology

Unadapted borrowing from English look.

Noun

look n (plural lookuri)

  1. look

Declension


Spanish

Etymology

Unadapted borrowing from English look.

Pronunciation

Noun

look m (plural looks)

  1. (informal) a look; style, appearance

Usage notes

According to Royal Spanish Academy (RAE) prescriptions, unadapted foreign words should be written in italics in a text printed in roman type, and vice versa, and in quotation marks in a manuscript text or when italics are not available. In practice, this RAE prescription is not always followed.

Further reading


Tagalog

Pronunciation

  • Hyphenation: lo‧ok
  • IPA(key): /loˈʔok/, [loˈʔok]

Noun

loók

  1. bay (body of water)
    Synonym: baiya
    Look ng Maynila
    Manila Bay
    • Baiya definition
      buyer
  2. middle part of a bay

Derived terms

See also