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fit definition

Overview

This page has 54 definitions of fit with English translations in 14 languages. Fit is an adjective, verb, noun and pronoun. Examples of how to use fit in a sentence are shown. Also define these 72 related words and terms: suitable, sexually, attractive, good-looking, fanciable, size, shape, y'know, tailor, adjust, attach, equip, supply, seemly, advertising, statistics, bridge, suit, trump, section, poem, ballad, seizure, convulsion, medicine, sudden, vigorous, appearance, symptom, outburst, emotion, blowout, hissy, tantrum, spell, moment, flurry, frenzy, paroxysm, suffer, fought, whistle, siren, fixed, target, fit, healthy, faire, zoology, web, interdigital, webbing, membrane, knitting, cast on, facio, fio, fet, anatomy, webbed, foot, flipper, meadowland, bank, lake, river, lower, end, what, fish, cold-blooded, and vertebrate.

See also: FiT, FIT, and fît

English fit definition

Pronunciation

Etymology 1

Possibly from Middle English fit (an adversary of equal power).

Adjective

fit (comparative fitter, superlative fittest)

  1. Suitable, proper.
    You have nothing to say about it. I'll do exactly as I see fit.
  2. Adapted to a purpose or environment.
    survival of the fittest
  3. In good shape; physically well.
    You don't have to be a good climber for Kilimanjaro, but you do have to be fit.
  4. (Britain, informal, chiefly slang) Sexually attractive; good-looking; fanciable.
    I think the girl working in the office is fit.
    • 2004, Mike Skinner (lyrics and music), “Fit but You Know It”, in A Grand Don't Come for Free, performed by The Streets:
      I think you are really fit / You're fit but my gosh don't you know it.
    • 2007, Kate Nash, Paul Eppworth (lyrics), “Foundations”, in Made of Bricks, performed by Kate Nash:
      I said I'd rather be with your friends, mate, cos they are much fitter.
  5. Prepared; ready.
Derived terms
Translations

Verb

fit (third-person singular simple present fits, present participle fitting, simple past and past participle fitted or fit)

  1. (transitive) To be suitable for.
    It fits the purpose.
    • 1918, Richard Dennis Teall Hollister, Speech-making, publ. George Wahr, pg. 81:
      The speaker should be certain that his subject fits the occasion.
  2. (transitive) To conform to in size and shape.
    The small shirt doesn't fit me, so I'll buy the medium size.
    If I lose a few kilos, the gorgeous wedding dress might fit me.
  3. (intransitive) To be of the right size and shape
    • 2016 February 2, Kate Winslet & al., Jimmy Kimmel Live!
      Even though in a way you let him freeze to death in the water, because the way I see it...
      I agree. Y'know, I think he actually could have fitted on that bit of door.
      There was plenty of room on the raft.
      I know. I know, I know.
    I wanted to borrow my little sister's jeans, but they didn't fit.
    That plug fit into the other socket, but it won't go in this one.
    • Y'know definition
      Shortened form of you know.
  4. (transitive, with to) To make conform in size and shape.
    I want to fit the drapes to the windows.
    1. (transitive) To tailor; to change to the appropriate size.
      I had a suit fitted by the tailor.
  5. (transitive) To be in agreement with.
    These definitions fit most of the usage.
    • 2004 October 14, Don Ringe, “Old English maþelian, mæþlan, mǣlan”, in J. H. W. Penney, editor, Indo-European Perspectives: Studies in Honour of Anna Morpurgo Davies[1], Oxford University Press, →ISBN, page 427:
      Type D half-lines ending in words of this type are analysed by Hutcheson as ending in two completely unstressed syllables. That analysis must be descriptively correct for, say, the 10th cent.; whether it would have fitted the facts in the 8th cent. is much less clear.
  6. (transitive) To adjust.
    The regression program fit a line to the data.
  7. (transitive) To attach, especially when requiring exact positioning or sizing.
    • 2012 May 13, Andrew Benson, “Williams's Pastor Maldonado takes landmark Spanish Grand Prix win”, in BBC Sport[2]:
      Williams had a problem fitting his left rear tyre and that left Alonso only 3.1secs adrift when he rejoined from his final stop three laps later.
  8. (transitive) To equip or supply.
    The chandler will fit us with provisions for a month.
    • Equip definition
      To supply with something necessary in order to carry out a specific action or task; to provide with (e.g. weapons, provisions, munitions, rigging) (1 of 4 equip definitions)
  9. (transitive) To make ready.
    I'm fitting the ship for a summer sail home.
    • 1871, Florence Nightingale, Una and the Lion, page 12:
      Thirty years ago, if a girl wished for training, there was none to be had. I can truly say there was no training to be had to fit a woman thoroughly for any life whatever.
  10. (intransitive, archaic) To be seemly.
  11. To be proper or becoming.
  12. (intransitive) To be in harmony.
    The paint, the fabrics, the rugs all fit.
Usage notes
Derived terms
Terms derived from fit (verb)
Translations

Noun

fit (plural fits)

  1. The degree to which something fits.
    This shirt is a bad fit.
    Since he put on weight, his jeans have been a tight fit.
  2. Conformity of elements one to another.
    It's hard to get a good fit using second-hand parts.
  3. The part of an object upon which anything fits tightly.
  4. (advertising) Measure of how well a particular commercial execution captures the character or values of a brand.
    The Wonder Bread advertising research results showed the “White Picket Fence” commercial had strong fit ratings.
  5. (statistics) Goodness of fit.
    • Statistics definition
      A discipline, principally within applied mathematics, concerned with the systematic study of the collection, presentation, analysis, and interpretation of data.
  6. (bridge) The quality of a partnership's combined holding of cards in a suit, particularly of trump.
    During the auction, it is often a partnership's goal to find an eight-card major suit fit.
Usage notes

Usually used in the singular preceded by an indefinite article and an adjective.

Translations

References

  • (advertising): The Advertising Research Handbook Charles E. Young, Ideas in Flight, Seattle, Washington, April 2005

Etymology 2

Unknown, possibly from Old English fitt (song), or from the sense of fitted to length.

Noun

fit (plural fits)

  1. (archaic) A section of a poem or ballad.

References

  • Oxford English Dictionary: fit, fyte n. 1

Etymology 3

Unknown, possibly from Old English fitt (conflict). Probably cognate with Italian fitta (pain, especially sudden and stabbing pain). See more at Latin fīgere.

Noun

fit (plural fits)

  1. A seizure or convulsion.
    My grandfather died after having a fit.
    • Seizure definition
      The act of taking possession, as by force or right of law. (1 of 5 seizure definitions)
  2. (medicine) A sudden and vigorous appearance of a symptom over a short period of time.
  3. A sudden outburst of emotion.
    Synonyms: blowout, hissy, tantrum, spell, moment
    He had a laughing fit which lasted more than ten minutes.
    She had a fit and threw all of his clothes out through the window.
    He threw a fit when his car broke down.
    • Tantrum definition
      An often childish display or fit of bad temper.
  4. A sudden burst (of an activity).
    Synonyms: flurry, frenzy, paroxysm
    • 2007 July 9, Ryan J. Foley, “Wisconsin city^s largest employer threatens to leave over ethanol”, in Associated Press:
      A fit of spring-cleaning led Eric Brooks to a box of old newspaper clips from 1997.
Derived terms
Terms derived from fit (noun)
Translations

Verb

fit (third-person singular simple present fits, present participle fitting, simple past and past participle fitted)

  1. (intransitive, medicine) To suffer a fit.
    • 2016, 18 May, Three dogs die and seven more ill after drinking from the same Kent lake amid contamination fears (in The Telegraph)
      A spokesman said: "It is believed they (the dogs) got into the lake and drank from it. They came out and started fitting. Shortly after that three of them died and vets are attempting to resuscitate the other one."

Etymology 4

Verb

fit

  1. (African-American Vernacular, dated) Fought.
    • Fought definition
      simple past tense and past participle of fight

Anagrams


Azerbaijani fit definition

Etymology

Of onomatopoetic origin.

Pronunciation

Noun

fit (definite accusative fiti, plural fitlər)

  1. whistle
    • Whistle definition
      A device designed to be placed in the mouth and blown, or driven by steam or some other mechanism, to make a whistling sound. (1 of 6 whistle definitions)
  2. siren (a device that makes a piercingly loud sound as an alarm or signal, or the sound from such a device)

Declension

Derived terms


Catalan fit definition

Pronunciation

Adjective

fit (feminine fita, masculine plural fits, feminine plural fites)

  1. fixed (of eyes, regard, etc.)
    • Fixed definition
      simple past tense and past participle of fix

Noun

fit m (plural fits)

  1. target

Chinese fit definition

Etymology

Borrowed from English fit.

Pronunciation


Adjective

fit

  1. (Cantonese) fit (physically well; in good shape)

Czech fit definition

Adjective

fit

  1. fit, healthy

Usage notes

  • This adjective is indeclinable.

Dutch fit definition

Pronunciation

Adjective

fit (comparative fitter, superlative fitst)

  1. fit (in good shape)

Inflection

Inflection of fit
uninflected fit
inflected fitte
comparative fitter
positive comparative superlative
predicative/adverbial fit fitter het fitst
het fitste
indefinite m./f. sing. fitte fittere fitste
n. sing. fit fitter fitste
plural fitte fittere fitste
definite fitte fittere fitste
partitive fits fitters

French fit definition

Pronunciation

Verb

fit

  1. third-person singular past historic of faire
    • Faire definition
      Obsolete spelling of fair

German fit definition

Etymology

From English fit.

Pronunciation

Adjective

fit (comparative fitter, superlative am fittesten)

  1. fit (in good physical shape)

Declension

Derived terms


Icelandic fit definition

An example of interdigital webbing on a frog.
A casting on.

Pronunciation

Noun

fit f (genitive singular fitjar, nominative plural fitjar)

  1. (zoology) web, interdigital webbing, a membrane that connects the digits of an animal
  2. (knitting) a casting on, casting on

Declension

Related terms

  • breiðafit
  • fitja
  • fuglafit
  • fuglsfit
  • gullfit
  • hundafit
  • lykkjufit
  • Halldórufit
  • silfurfit
  • skollafit
  • sundfit

Further reading



Latin fit definition

Verb

fit

  1. third-person singular present passive indicative of faciō
    • Facio definition
      i do (particularly as a specific instance or occasion of doing) (1 of 4 facio definitions)
  2. third-person singular present active indicative of fīō
    • Fio definition
      first-person singular present indicative form of fiar

Luxembourgish fit definition

Etymology

From English fit, probably through German fit.

Pronunciation

Adjective

fit (masculine fitten, neuter fit, comparative méi fit, superlative am fitsten)

  1. fit (in good shape)

Norwegian Nynorsk fit definition

Etymology

From Old Norse fit.

Noun

fit f (definite singular fita or fiti, indefinite plural fitjar or fiter, definite plural fitjane or fitene)

  1. form removed with the spelling reform of 2012; superseded by fet

Old Norse fit definition

Noun

fit f (genitive fitjar, plural fitjar)

  1. (zoology, anatomy) webbed foot (of swimming birds)
  2. (zoology, anatomy) flippers (of a seal)
  3. (landform) meadowland on the banks of a lake or river
    • River definition
      A large and often winding stream which drains a land mass, carrying water down from higher areas to a lower point, oftentimes ending in another body of water, such as an ocean or in an inland sea. (1 of 4 river definitions)

Declension

References

  • fit in Geir T. Zoëga (1910) A Concise Dictionary of Old Icelandic, Oxford: Clarendon Press

Scots fit definition

Etymology 1

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Noun

fit (plural fits)

  1. foot
  2. lower end (of a street, river, field etc)
Derived terms

Verb

fit (third-person singular present fits, present participle fitin, past fitt, past participle fitt)

  1. to foot

Etymology 2

See the etymology of the main entry.

Pronoun

fit

  1. Doric form of what
    • What definition
      Which thing, event, circumstance, etc.: used interrogatively in asking for the specification of an identity, quantity, quality, etc. (1 of 4 what definitions)

Volapük fit definition

Pronunciation

Noun

fit (nominative plural fits)

  1. (male or female) fish (cold-blooded vertebrate)
    • Vertebrate definition
      Having a backbone.

Declension

Derived terms

See also