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egg definition

Overview

This page has 40 definitions of egg with English translations in 6 languages. Egg is a noun and verb. Examples of how to use egg in a sentence are shown. Also define these 0 related words and terms: .

See also: Egg and EGG

English egg definition

Chicken eggs in a nest
An egg being fried as food
An Easter egg made of chocolate and caramel

Pronunciation

Etymology 1

From Middle English eg, egg, egge, from Old Norse egg (egg), from Proto-Germanic *ajją (egg) (by Holtzmann's law), from Proto-Indo-European *h₂ōwyóm (egg). Cognate with Icelandic egg (egg), Faroese egg (egg), Norwegian egg (egg), Swedish ägg (egg), Danish æg (egg).

The native English ey (plural eyren), akin to Dutch ei (plural eieren) and German Ei (plural Eier) are ultimately from the same Proto-Germanic root, survived into the 16th century before being fully displaced by egg. More at ey. Doublet of ovum.

Alternative forms

Noun

egg (plural eggs)

  1. (zoology, countable) An approximately spherical or ellipsoidal body produced by birds, reptiles, insects and other animals, housing the embryo during its development.
  2. (countable, uncountable) The egg of a domestic fowl (especially a hen) or its contents, used as food.
    I also determine the minimal amount of egg required to make good mayonnaise.
    We made a big omelette with three eggs.
    The farmer offered me some fresh eggs, but I told him I was allergic to egg.
  3. (biology, countable) The female primary cell, the ovum.
    • 1981, William Irwin Thompson, The Time Falling Bodies Take to Light: Mythology, Sexuality and the Origins of Culture, London: Rider/Hutchinson & Co., page 80:
      In the Fall into the division of labor, Levi-Strauss sees the great hunters trading women to create the exogamous bonds of one hunting band with another. The egg is, but the sperm does. The tiny sperm may be furious in its activity, but its highway to the egg is paved by the alkaline trail set down by the Great Mother.
    • 2013 May-June, Katrina G. Claw, “Rapid Evolution in Eggs and Sperm”, in American Scientist[1], volume 101, number 3:
      Many genes with reproductive roles also have antibacterial and immune functions, which indicate that the threat of microbial attack on the sperm or egg may be a major influence on rapid evolution during reproduction.
  4. Anything shaped like an egg, such as an Easter egg or a chocolate egg.
  5. A swelling on one's head, usually large or noticeable, associated with an injury.
  6. (derogatory, ethnic slur, uncommon) A white person considered to be overly infatuated with East Asia.
  7. (New Zealand, derogatory) A foolish or obnoxious person.
    Shut up, you egg!
  8. (archaic, derogatory) A young person.
  9. (informal) A person, fellow.
    • 1932, Delos W. Lovelace, King Kong, published 1965, page 31:
      ‘Some big, hard-boiled egg meets up with a pretty face, and bingo! He cracks up and melts.’
    • 1980, Stephen King, The Wedding Gig:
      Up close he looked like a pretty tough egg. His hair was bristling up in the back in spite of what smelled like a whole bottle of Wildroot Creme Oil and he had the flat, oddly shiny eyes that some deep-sea fish have.
    good egg; bad egg; tough egg
  10. (LGBT, slang) A person who is regarded as having not yet realized they are transgender, has not yet come out, or is in the early stages of transitioning.
    • 2018, Casey Plett, Little Fish, →ISBN, page 24:
      That fits, though, she thought. Wear the same outfit day after day, your brain gets numb to how it looks or feels—Wendy shut the album. No. [] She hated analyzing the whys of [not-out] trans girls. She had always hated it, and she hated how easy it had become; the bottomless hole of egg mode.
  11. (LGBT, slang) One's lack of awareness that one is transgender.
  12. (computing) One of the blocks of data injected into a program's address space for use by certain forms of shellcode, such as "omelettes".
    • 2015, Herbert Bos, Fabian Monrose, Gregory Blanc, Research in Attacks, Intrusions, and Defenses: 18th International Symposium:
      This approach would be altered for an optimal omelette based exploit. One would spray the heap with the omelette code solely, then load a single copy of the additional shellcode eggs into memory outside the target region for the spray.
  13. (Internet slang, derogatory, dated) A user of the microblogging service Twitter who has the default avatar (which was historically an egg) rather than a custom picture; a noob.
Synonyms
Hyponyms
Hypernyms
Derived terms
Descendants
  • Jamaican Creole: eg
  • Sranan Tongo: eksi
Translations

Verb

egg (third-person singular simple present eggs, present participle egging, simple past and past participle egged)

  1. To throw eggs (the food item) at.
    The angry demonstrators egged the riot police.
  2. (cooking) To dip in or coat with beaten egg (the food item).
  3. To distort a circular cross-section (as in a tube) to an elliptical or oval shape, either inadvertently or intentionally.
    After I cut the tubing, I found that I had slightly egged it in the vise.
Translations

See also

Etymology 2

From Middle English eggen, from Old Norse eggja (to incite), from egg (edge).

Verb

egg (third-person singular simple present eggs, present participle egging, simple past and past participle egged)

  1. (transitive, obsolete except in egg on) To encourage, incite.
    • 14th c., William Langland, Piers Plowman[2], Passus 1:
      Þerinne wonieth a wiȝte · þat wronge is yhote
      Fader of falshed · and founded it hym-selue
      Adam and Eue · he egged to ille
      Conseilled caym · to kullen his brother
      Therein woneth a wight that Wrong is y-hote,
      Father of falsehood — and founded it himself.
      Adam and Eve he egged to ill,
      Counselled Cain to kill his brother
    • 1571, Arthur Golding, “Epistle Dedicatorie”, in The Psalmes of David and others. With M. John Calvins Commentaries[3]:
      [] yit have wee one thing in our selves and of our selves (even originall sinne, concupiscence or lust) which never ceaseth too egge us and allure us from God []
Derived terms
Translations

Further reading

  • egg on Wikipedia.Wikipedia
  • egging on Wikipedia.Wikipedia
  • (transgender): Morgan Lev Edward Holleb (2019) The A-Z of Gender and Sexuality: From Ace to Ze, page 98

Anagrams


Faroese egg definition

Pronunciation

Etymology 1

From Old Norse egg, from Proto-Germanic *ajją, from Proto-Indo-European *h₂ōwyóm.

Noun

egg n (genitive singular egs, plural egg)

  1. egg
Declension
n23 Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative egg eggið egg eggini
Accusative egg eggið egg eggini
Dative eggi egginum egg(j)um egg(j)unum
Genitive egs egsins eggja eggjanna
Derived terms
  • antaregg
  • eggjahvíti
  • eggjakoppur
  • eggjakøka
  • eggjareyði
  • eggjaskal
  • froskaegg
  • gásaregg
  • harðkókað egg
  • høsnaregg
  • páskaregg
  • sjokulátuegg
 

Etymology 2

From the Old Norse egg, from Proto-Germanic *agjō, from Proto-Indo-European *h₂eḱ- (sharp, pointed).

Noun

egg f (genitive singular eggjar, plural eggjar)

  1. blade, edge
  2. border, edge of a cliff
Declension
f8 Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative egg eggin eggjar eggjarnar
Accusative egg eggina eggjar eggjarnar
Dative egg eggini eggjum eggjunum
Genitive eggjar eggjarinnar eggja eggjanna

German egg definition

Pronunciation

Verb

egg

  1. singular imperative of eggen
  2. (colloquial) first-person singular present of eggen

Icelandic egg definition

Pronunciation

Etymology 1

From Old Norse egg, from Proto-Germanic *ajją, from Proto-Indo-European *h₂ōwyóm. Cognate with Old English ǣġ (obsolete English ey); Swedish ägg; Old High German ei (German Ei).

Noun

egg n (genitive singular eggs, nominative plural egg)

  1. (zoology) an egg
  2. an oval shaped object
  3. the ovum
Declension
Synonyms
Derived terms
  • arnaregg (eagle's egg)
  • dúfuegg (dove's egg)
  • eggjahvíta (egg white)
  • eggjarauða, eggjablómi (egg yolk)
  • eggjasalad
  • eggjaskurn
  • hrafnsegg (raven's egg)
  • höggormsegg (snake's egg)
  • kríuegg
  • liggja á eggjum (to brood, sit on eggs)
  • páskaegg
  • verpa eggi (to lay an egg)
  • álptaregg (swan's egg)
  • æðaregg (eider duck's egg)
 

Etymology 2

From Old Norse egg, from Proto-Germanic *agjō, from Proto-Indo-European *h₂eḱ- (sharp, pointed).

Cognates include Old Frisian egg, Old Saxon eggia, Dutch egge; Old English ecg (English edge); Old High German egga (German Ecke); Swedish egg.

The Indo-European root is also the source of Latin aciēs (edge, sharpness), Ancient Greek ἀκίς (akís, point).

Noun

egg f (genitive singular eggjar, nominative plural eggjar)

  1. (weaponry) the sharp edge of a knife, sword, or similar
  2. a sharp edge on a mountain
Declension
Synonyms
  • (sharp edge): blað
  • (mountain): fjallsegg
Derived terms
  • fjallsegg
  • með oddi og egg/með oddi og eggju

Middle English egg definition

Noun

egg

  1. Alternative form of eg (egg)

Norwegian Bokmål egg definition

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɛɡ/
  • Rhymes: -ɛɡ
  • Hyphenation: egg

Etymology 1

From Old Norse egg n (egg), from Proto-Germanic *ajją (egg), from Proto-Indo-European *h₂ōwyóm (egg), likely from *h₂éwis (bird), possibly from *h₂ew- (to enjoy, consume).

Cognate with English egg (egg), Icelandic egg (egg), Faroese egg (egg), Swedish ägg (egg), Danish æg (egg).

Noun

egg n (definite singular egget, indefinite plural egg, definite plural egga or eggene)

  1. an egg
Derived terms

Etymology 2

From Old Norse egg f.

Noun

egg f or m (definite singular egga or eggen, indefinite plural egger, definite plural eggene)

  1. (cutting) edge (e.g. of a knife)
Derived terms

References


Norwegian Nynorsk egg definition

Pronunciation

Etymology 1

From Old Norse egg n, from Proto-Germanic *ajją, from Proto-Indo-European *h₂ōwyóm. Akin to English egg.

Noun

egg n (definite singular egget, indefinite plural egg, definite plural egga)

  1. an egg
Inflection
indefinite singular definite singular indefinite plural definite plural
Aasen1 Egg n Egget Egg Eggi
1901 egget (egge)
1917 egget egga, eggi
1938 egga [eggi]
2012 (current) egg n egget egg egga

Forms in italics are currently considered non-standard. Forms in [brackets] were official, but considered second-tier. Forms in (parentheses) were allowed under Midlandsnormalen. 1Nouns were capitalised for most of the 19th century.

Derived terms

Etymology 2

From Old Norse egg f, from Proto-Germanic *agjō f (edge, corner), and ultimately from the Proto-Indo-European root *h₂eḱ-. Cognates include English edge and German Ecke.

Noun

egg f or m (definite singular eggen or egga, indefinite plural eggar or egger, definite plural eggane or eggene)

  1. an edge (the thin cutting side of the blade of an instrument, such as an ax, knife, sword, or scythe)
  2. (geology) an arête
Inflection
indefinite singular definite singular indefinite plural definite plural
Aasen1 Egg f Eggi Eggjar Eggjarna
1901 eggjarne (eggjane)
1917 egga, eggi eggjar, egger eggjane, eggene
1938 egga [eggi] egger eggene
1959 egg m or f eggen, egga [eggi] eggar, egger eggane, eggene
2012 (current) egg m or f eggen, egga eggar, egger eggane, eggene

Forms in italics are currently considered non-standard. Forms in [brackets] were official, but considered second-tier. Forms in (parentheses) were allowed under Midlandsnormalen. 1Nouns were capitalised for most of the 19th century.

References


Old Norse egg definition

Etymology 1

From Proto-Germanic *ajją, from Proto-Indo-European *h₂ōwyóm.

Noun

egg n (genitive eggs, plural egg)

  1. egg
Declension
Descendants
  • Icelandic: egg
  • Faroese: egg
  • Norwegian Bokmål: egg
  • Elfdalian: egg
  • Westrobothnian: aigg
  • Old Swedish: æg
  • Scanian: ægg
  • Danish: æg
  • Middle English: eg

Etymology 2

From Proto-Germanic *agjō. Ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *h₂eḱ- (sharp).

Noun

egg f (genitive eggjar, plural eggjar)

  1. edge (of a blade)
Declension
Descendants
  • Icelandic: egg
  • Faroese: egg
  • Norwegian Nynorsk: egg m or f
  • Norwegian Bokmål: egg m or f
  • Dalian: egg
  • Westrobothnian: aigg
  • Old Swedish: eg
  • Danish: æg

References

  • Zoëga, Geir T. (1910) A Concise Dictionary of Old Icelandic[4], Oxford: Clarendon Press

Swedish egg definition

Etymology

From Old Norse egg, from Proto-Germanic *agjō, from Proto-Indo-European *h₂eḱ- (sharp, pointed).

Pronunciation

Noun

egg c

  1. The sharp edge of a cutting tool.

Declension

Declension of egg 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative egg eggen eggar eggarna
Genitive eggs eggens eggars eggarnas

Related terms

  • egga (to stimulate; to encourage somebody to do a specific action)
  • eggelse
  • eggjärn
  • eggredskap
  • eggskydd
  • eggstål
  • eggvapen
  • eggvass
  • eggverktyg
  • knivsegg
  • yxegg
 

References


Westrobothnian egg definition

Pronunciation

Etymology 1

From Old Norse egg, from Proto-Germanic *ajją. Compare with Swedish ägg.

Noun

egg n (definite singular eggj’eð, defininte plural egg’a)

  1. Egg.

Etymology 2

From Old Norse egg from Proto-Germanic *agjō.

Pronunciation

Noun

egg n (definite singular eggj’eð, defininte plural egg’a)

  1. The sharp edge of a cutting tool.
Derived terms
  • eggbrøst

References

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.3 Lindgren, J. V., 1940, “'*agg etc.”, in Orbok över Burträskmålet, page 36 and 163
  • Marklund, Thorsten, 1986, Skelleftemålet: grammatik och ordlista : för lekmän - av lekman [The Skellefteå speech: grammar and vocabulary: for laymen - by a layman], →ISBN, page 72