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bring

Overview

This page has 17 definitions of bring with English translations in 7 languages. Bring is a verb, interjection and noun. Examples of how to use bring in a sentence are shown. Also define these 19 related words and terms: transport, supply, contribute, occasion, bring about, raise, baseball, fastball, closer, telephone, bring, deliver, take, lead, bringe, jungle, forest, bringen, and bryngen.

See also: bRing

English

Pronunciation

Etymology 1

From Middle English bryngen, from Old English bringan (to bring, lead, bring forth, carry, adduce, produce, present, offer), from Proto-Germanic *bringaną (to bring) (compare West Frisian bringe, Low German bringen, Dutch brengen, German bringen), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰrenk- (compare Welsh hebrwng (to bring, lead), Tocharian B pränk- (to take away; restrain oneself, hold back), Latvian brankti (lying close), Lithuanian branktas (whiffletree)).

Verb

bring (third-person singular simple present brings, present participle bringing, simple past and past participle brought)

  1. (transitive, ditransitive) To transport toward somebody/somewhere.
    Waiter, please bring me a single malt whiskey.
    • a1420, The British Museum Additional MS, 12,056, “Wounds complicated by the Dislocation of a Bone”, in Robert von Fleischhacker, editor, Lanfranc's "Science of cirurgie.", London: K. Paul, Trench, Trübner & Co, translation of original by Lanfranc of Milan, published 1894, →ISBN, page 63:
      Ne take noon hede to brynge togidere þe parties of þe boon þat is to-broken or dislocate, til viij. daies ben goon in þe wyntir, & v. in þe somer; for þanne it schal make quytture, and be sikir from swellynge; & þanne brynge togidere þe brynkis eiþer þe disiuncture after þe techynge þat schal be seid in þe chapitle of algebra.
    • 1892, Walter Besant, chapter II, in The Ivory Gate [], New York, N.Y.: Harper & Brothers, [], OCLC 16832619:
      At twilight in the summer [] the mice come out. They [] eat the luncheon crumbs. Mr. Checkly, for instance, always brought his dinner in a paper parcel in his coat-tail pocket, and ate it when so disposed, sprinkling crumbs lavishly [] on the floor.
    • 1963, Margery Allingham, chapter 5, in The China Governess[1]:
      A waiter brought his aperitif, which was a small scotch and soda, and as he sipped it gratefully he sighed. ¶ ‘Civilized,’ he said to Mr. Campion. ‘Humanizing.’ [] ‘Cigars and summer days and women in big hats with swansdown face-powder, that's what it reminds me of.’
    • 2012 August 21, Pilkington, Ed, “Death penalty on trial: should Reggie Clemons live or die?”, in The Guardian:
      Next month, Clemons will be brought before a court presided over by a "special master", who will review the case one last time.
  2. (transitive, figuratively) To supply or contribute.
    The new company director brought a fresh perspective on sales and marketing.
    • 1910, Emerson Hough, chapter I, in The Purchase Price: Or The Cause of Compromise, Indianapolis, Ind.: The Bobbs-Merrill Company, OCLC 639762314, page 0029:
      [] it is not fair of you to bring against mankind double weapons ! Dangerous enough you are as woman alone, without bringing to your aid those gifts of mind suited to problems which men have been accustomed to arrogate to themselves.”
    • Contribute definition
      To give something that is or becomes part of a larger whole.
  3. (transitive) To occasion or bring about.
    The controversial TV broadcast brought a storm of complaints.
  4. (transitive) To raise (a lawsuit, charges, etc.) against somebody.
    • 2013 August 10, “Can China clean up fast enough?”, in The Economist, volume 408, number 8848:
      It has jailed environmental activists and is planning to limit the power of judicial oversight by handing a state-approved body a monopoly over bringing environmental lawsuits.
  5. To persuade; to induce; to draw; to lead; to guide.
  6. To produce in exchange; to sell for; to fetch.
    What does coal bring per ton?
  7. (baseball) To pitch, often referring to a particularly hard thrown fastball.
    The closer Jones can really bring it.
    • Baseball definition
      A sport common in North America, the Caribbean, and Japan, in which the object is to strike a ball so that one of a nine-person team can run counter-clockwise among four bases, resulting in the scoring of a run. The team with the most runs after termination of play, usually nine innings, wins. (1 of 3 baseball definitions)
    • Fastball definition
      Any of the variations of high speed pitches thrown in baseball (1 of 3 fastball definitions)
Conjugation
Usage notes
  • Past brang and past participle brung and broughten forms are sometimes used in some dialects, especially in informal speech.
Derived terms
Terms derived from "bring"
Translations
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Dictionary:Entry layout § Translations.

Etymology 2

Onomatopeia.

Interjection

bring

  1. The sound of a telephone ringing.

Afrikaans

Alternative forms

Etymology

From Dutch bringen, a dialectal variant of standard brengen (to bring). Both forms were originally distinct, though related, verbs, but were early on conflated.

Pronunciation

Verb

bring (present bring, present participle bringende, past participle gebring)

  1. (transitive) to bring; to deliver
  2. (transitive) to take; to lead (to another place)
    Bring asseblief hierdie borde kombuis toe.
    Please, take these dishes to the kitchen.

Derived terms

  • uitbring
  • wegbring

Danish

Verb

bring

  1. imperative of bringe
    • Bringe definition
      Obsolete spelling of bring

Garo

Etymology

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Noun

bring

  1. jungle, forest

German

Pronunciation

Verb

bring

  1. imperative singular of bringen
    • Bringen definition
      definite singular of bringe

Middle English

Verb

bring

  1. Alternative form of bryngen
    • Bryngen definition
      to bring; to (physically) convey or deliver towards (1 of 8 bryngen definitions)

North Frisian

Etymology

From Old Frisian bringa, which derives from Proto-Germanic *bringaną. Cognates include West Frisian bringe.

Verb

bring

  1. (Föhr-Amrum), (Heligoland) to bring

Conjugation



Norwegian Bokmål

Verb

bring

  1. imperative of bringe

Scots

Etymology

From Middle English bryngen, from Old English bringan.

Pronunciation

Verb

bring (third-person singular present brings, present participle bringin, past brocht, past participle brocht)

  1. To bring.