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boon definition

Overview

This page has 15 definitions of boon with English translations in 4 languages. Boon is a noun and adjective. Examples of how to use boon in a sentence are shown. Also define these 0 related words and terms: .

See also: bon and Boon

English boon definition

Pronunciation

Etymology 1

From Middle English boon (prayer), from Old Norse bón (prayer, petition), from Proto-Germanic *bōniz (supplication), influenced by boon (good, favorable, adj). Doublet of ben; see there for more.

Noun

boon (plural boons)

  1. (obsolete) A prayer; petition.
  2. (archaic) That which is asked or granted as a benefit or favor; a gift or benefaction.
    • 1881, The Bible (English Revised Version), James 1:17:
      Every good gift and every perfect boon is from above [...]
    • 1872, James De Mille, The Cryptogram:[1]
      I gave you life. Can you not return the boon by giving me death, my lord?
  3. A good thing; a blessing or benefit; a thing to be thankful for.
    • 2013 July–August, Catherine Clabby, “Focus on Everything”, in American Scientist:
      Not long ago, it was difficult to produce photographs of tiny creatures with every part in focus. [...] A photo processing technique called focus stacking has changed that. Developed as a tool to electronically combine the sharpest bits of multiple digital images, focus stacking is a boon to biologists seeking full focus on a micron scale.
    Finding the dry cave was a boon to the weary travellers.
    Anaesthetics are a great boon to modern surgery.
  4. (Britain, dialectal) An unpaid service due by a tenant to his lord.
Synonyms
Antonyms
Translations
Derived terms

Etymology 2

From Middle English boon, bone, borrowed from Old Northern French boon, from Old French bon (good), from Latin bonus (good), from Old Latin duonus, dvenos, from Proto-Indo-European *dū- (to respect).

Adjective

boon (comparative booner, superlative boonest)

  1. (obsolete) Good; prosperous.
    boon voyage
  2. (archaic) Kind; bountiful; benign.
  3. (now only in boon companion) gay; merry; jovial; convivial.
    • 1667, John Milton, “Book IX”, in Paradise Lost. [], London: [] [Samuel Simmons], [], OCLC 228722708; republished as Paradise Lost in Ten Books: [], London: Basil Montagu Pickering [], 1873, OCLC 230729554:
      Greedily she ingorg’d without restraint,
      And knew not eating Death: Satiate at length,
      And hight’nd as with Wine, jocond and boon,
      Thus to her self she pleasingly began.
    • 1712, John Arbuthnot, chapter 16, in The History of John Bull:
    • 1848 November – 1850 December, William Makepeace Thackeray, chapter 50, in The History of Pendennis. [], volume (please specify |volume=I or II), London: Bradbury and Evans, [], OCLC 2057953:
      I’m a lonely old man; I lead a life that I don’t like, among boon companions, who make me melancholy.
    • 1922 February, James Joyce, “[16]”, in Ulysses, London: The Egoist Press, published October 1922, OCLC 2297483:
      ―No, Mr Bloom repeated again, I wouldn't personally repose much trust in that boon companion of yours who contributes the humorous element, if I were in your shoes.
    • 1935, Samuel Beckett, Watt:
      [] the boon twins Art and Con aged thirty-seven years []
    • 1985, Herbert Kretzmer (English lyrics), Les Misérables (musical), "Master of the House," second and third refrains, fifth line:
      (2) "Everybody's boon companion, / Everybody's chaperon"; (3) "Everybody's boon companion: / Give[s] 'em everything he's got"
Related terms
Translations

Etymology 3

From Middle English bone (North), akin to or alteration of Old English bune (reed).[1]

Noun

boon (uncountable)

  1. The woody portion of flax, separated from the fiber as refuse matter by retting, braking, and scutching.

Etymology 4

Noun

boon (plural boons)

  1. (slang) Clipping of sheboon.
Synonyms

References

  1. ^ Random House Webster's Unabridged Dictionary, s.v. ‘boon3’ (NY: Random House, 2001).

Anagrams


Afrikaans boon definition

Etymology

From Dutch boon, from Middle Dutch bône, from Old Dutch *bōna, from Proto-Germanic *baunō.

Pronunciation

Noun

boon (plural bone, diminutive boontjie)

  1. bean

Descendants


Dutch boon definition

Etymology

From Middle Dutch bône, from Old Dutch *bōna, from Proto-Germanic *baunō.

Pronunciation

Noun

boon f or m (plural bonen, diminutive boontje n)

  1. bean

Hypernyms

Derived terms

Descendants


Middle English boon definition

Etymology 1

Borrowed from Old Norse bón, from Proto-Germanic *bōniz.

Alternative forms

Pronunciation

Noun

boon (plural boons or boonen)

  1. prayer, supplication, request
  2. boon, bonus
Descendants

Etymology 2

Borrowed from Old Northern French boon, from Old French bon (good).

Alternative forms

Pronunciation

Adjective

boon

  1. good
Descendants

Etymology 3

Noun

boon (plural boons)

  1. Alternative form of bon