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Novak Djokovic

Serbian tennis player

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Novak Djokovic
Djokovic in Wimbledon 2017
Native nameНовак Ђоковић
Novak Đoković
Country (sports)  Serbia and Montenegro (2003–2006)
 Serbia (2006–present)
ResidenceMarbella, Spain
Born (1987-05-22) 22 May 1987 (age 33)
Belgrade, SR Serbia, SFR Yugoslavia
Height1.88 m (6 ft 2 in)[1][2]
Turned pro2003
PlaysRight-handed (two-handed backhand)
CoachMarián Vajda
Goran Ivanišević
Prize moneyUS$ 143,916,560
Official websitenovakdjokovic.com
Singles
Career record920–188 (83.0% in ATP Tour and Grand Slam main draw matches, and in Davis Cup; 2nd in the Open Era)
Career titles80 (5th in the Open Era)
Highest rankingNo. 1 (4 July 2011)
Current rankingNo. 1 (3 February 2020)[3]
Grand Slam Singles results
Australian OpenW (2008, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2015, 2016, 2019, 2020)
French OpenW (2016)
WimbledonW (2011, 2014, 2015, 2018, 2019)
US OpenW (2011, 2015, 2018)
Other tournaments
Tour FinalsW (2008, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015)
Olympic Games (2008)
Doubles
Career record55–72 (43.3% in ATP Tour and Grand Slam main draw matches, and in Davis Cup)
Career titles1
Highest rankingNo. 114 (30 November 2009)
Current rankingNo. 144 (14 September 2020)[4]
Grand Slam Doubles results
Australian Open1R (2006, 2007)
French Open1R (2006)
Wimbledon2R (2006)
US Open1R (2006)
Team competitions
Davis CupW (2010)
Hopman CupF (2008, 2013)
Last updated on: 16 September 2020.
Novak Djokovic
President of ATP Player Council
In office
30 August 2016 – 29 August 2020
Vice PresidentKevin Anderson
Preceded byEric Butorac
Succeeded byTBA
Signature

Novak Djokovic (Serbian: Новак Ђоковић, romanizedNovak Đoković, pronounced [nôʋaːk dʑôːkoʋitɕ] ( listen);[5] born 22 May 1987) is a Serbian professional tennis player who is currently ranked world No. 1 in men's singles tennis by the Association of Tennis Professionals (ATP).[6]

Djokovic has won 17 Grand Slam singles titles, the third-most in history for a male player, five ATP Finals titles, 35 ATP Tour Masters 1000 titles, 14 ATP Tour 500 titles, and has held the No. 1 spot in the ATP rankings for over 285 weeks (second of all time). In majors, he has won a record eight Australian Open titles, five Wimbledon titles, three US Open titles, and one French Open title. By winning the 2016 French Open, he became the eighth player in history to achieve the Career Grand Slam and the third man to hold all four major titles at once, the first since Rod Laver in 1969[7] and the first ever to do so on three different surfaces.[8] He is the only male player to have won all nine of the modern Masters 1000 tournaments and has won each twice.[9][10] Djokovic was also a member of Serbia's winning Davis Cup team in 2010 and in the 2020 ATP Cup.

Djokovic is the first Serbian player to be ranked No. 1 by the ATP and the first male player representing Serbia to win a Grand Slam singles title. He is a six-time ITF World Champion and a five-time ATP year-end No. 1 ranked player. Djokovic has won numerous awards, including the Laureus World Sports Award for Sportsman of the Year (four times)[11] and the 2011 BBC Overseas Sports Personality of the Year award. He is also a recipient of the Order of St. Sava, the Order of Karađorđe's Star, and the Order of the Republika Srpska.[12][13][14]

Novak Djokovic Intro articles: 13

Early and personal life

Novak Djokovic (Nole) was born on 22 May 1987 in Belgrade, SR Serbia, Yugoslavia, to parents Srđan and Dijana (née Žagar). He is of Serbian and Croatian descent.[15][16] Novak's father Srđan was born in a village near Trepča, in Kosovo,[17] and in the early 1980s, moved his family to Belgrade.[18] Novak's mother Dijana (née Žagar) was born in Belgrade. His two younger brothers, Marko and Djordje, have also played professional tennis.[19]

A resident of Monte Carlo, Djokovic was coached by former Slovak tennis player Marián Vajda from 2006 until Boris Becker took over the role of head coach in December 2013.[20] Djokovic is a self-described fan of languages, speaking Serbian, English, French, German, and Italian.[21][22]

He met his future wife, Jelena Ristić, in high school, and began dating her in 2005.[23] The two became engaged in September 2013,[24] and on 10 July 2014 the couple got married on Sveti Stefan in Montenegro,[25] while a church wedding was held in the same place, on 12 July 2014, in the Church of Saint Stephen (Serbian: Црква Светог Архиђакона Стефана) which belongs to Praskvica Monastery.[26] On 24 April 2014, Djokovic announced that he and Ristić were expecting their first child.[27] Their son, Stefan, was born on 21 October 2014 in Nice, France.[28] Their daughter, Tara, was born on 2 September 2017.[29]

Djokovic began playing tennis at the age of four.[30] In the summer of 1993, the six-year-old was spotted by Yugoslav tennis player Jelena Genčić[31] at Mount Kopaonik, where Djokovic's parents ran a fast-food parlour.[32] Upon seeing the child Djokovic playing tennis, she stated: "This is the greatest talent I have seen since Monica Seles."[19]

Genčić worked with young Djokovic over the following six years before realizing that, due to his rapid development, going abroad in search of increased level of competition was the best option for his future. To that end, she contacted Nikola Pilić and in September 1999 the 12-year-old moved to the Pilić tennis academy in Oberschleißheim, Germany, spending four years there.[33] At the age of 14, he began his international career, winning European championships in singles, doubles, and team competition.[19]

Djokovic is a member of the "Champions for Peace" club, a group of famous elite athletes committed to serving peace in the world through sport, created by Peace and Sport, a Monaco-based international organization.[34]

Djokovic is a member of the Serbian Orthodox Church. On 28 April 2011, Patriarch Irinej of Serbia awarded Djokovic the Order of St. Sava I class, the highest decoration of the Serbian Orthodox Church, for his contributions to monasteries of the Serbian Orthodox Church in Kosovo and Metohija and charitable work in Serbia.[35] He is a keen fan of Serbian football club Red Star Belgrade,[36] Italian club A.C. Milan[37] and Portuguese club S.L. Benfica.[38] He is good friends with fellow Serbian tennis player Ana Ivanovic, whom he has known since the two were children growing up in Serbia, through Djokovic's uncle and Ivanovic's father.[39]

Djokovic has been reported to meditate for up to an hour a day at the Buddhist Buddhapadipa Temple in Wimbledon, and is close to monks in the complex. He has spoken of the positive power of meditation.[40][41][42]

Novak Djokovic Early and personal life articles: 32

Tennis career

Novak Djokovic Singles Ranking History Chart
Singles Ranking Composite History Chart (Roger Federer, Rafael Nadal, Novak Djokovic)

Juniors

As a member of the Yugoslav national team, Djokovic reached the final of the 2001 Junior Davis Cup for players under 14, in which he lost his match in singles.[43] In juniors, Djokovic compiled a singles win/loss record of 40–11 (and 23–6 in doubles), reaching a combined junior world ranking of No. 24 in February 2004.[44] At the junior Grand Slam tournaments his best showing was at the Australian Open where he reached the semi-finals in 2004. He also played at the French Open and US Open junior events in 2003.

Start of professional career

Djokovic turned professional in 2003 by entering the ATP World Tour.[45] At the beginning of his professional career, he mainly played in Futures and Challenger tournaments, winning three of each type from 2003 to 2005. His first tour-level tournament was Umag in 2004, where he lost to Filippo Volandri in the round of 32.[46]

Djokovic made his first Grand Slam tournament appearance by qualifying for the 2005 Australian Open, where he was defeated by eventual champion Marat Safin in the first round in straight sets, after defeating future rival Stanislas Wawrinka in qualifying.[47][48] He went on to reach the third round of both Wimbledon and the US Open, coming back from two sets down to defeat Guillermo García-López in the former, and beating Gaël Monfils and Mario Ančić in the latter. Djokovic participated in four Masters events and qualified for two of them, his best performance coming in Paris, where he reached the third round and defeated fourth seed Mariano Puerta along the way.[49]

2006: First ATP titles

Djokovic reached the top 40 in the world singles rankings after making his first quarterfinal appearance at a Grand Slam event, coming at the French Open, and also by reaching the fourth round at Wimbledon that year.[50]

Three weeks after Wimbledon, Djokovic won his first ATP title at the Dutch Open in Amersfoort without losing a set, defeating Nicolás Massú in the final. He won his second career title at the Moselle Open in Metz, and moved into the top 20.[51] Djokovic also reached his first career Masters quarterfinal at Madrid during the indoor hardcourt season.[52]

On 9 April 2006, Djokovic clinched a decisive Davis Cup win against Great Britain by defeating Greg Rusedski in four sets in the fourth match of the tie, giving Serbia and Montenegro an insurmountable 3–1 lead in their best-of-five series, thus keeping the country in the Group One Euro/African Zone of Davis Cup. Afterwards, Djokovic briefly considered moving from Serbia to play for Great Britain.[53] Following this match-up, the British media spoke of Djokovic's camp negotiating with the Lawn Tennis Association about changing his international loyalty by joining British tennis ranks.[53] The nineteen-year-old Djokovic, who was ranked sixty-third in the world at the time, mostly dismissed the story at first by saying that the talks were not serious, describing them as "the British being very kind to us after the Davis Cup."[54] However, more than three years later, in October 2009, Djokovic confirmed that the talks between his family and the LTA throughout April and May 2006 were indeed serious:

Britain was offering me a lot of opportunities and they needed someone because Andy [Murray] was the only one, and still is. That had to be a disappointment for all the money they invest. But I didn't need the money as much as I had done. I had begun to make some for myself, enough to afford to travel with a coach, and I said, 'Why the heck?' I am Serbian, I am proud of being a Serbian, I didn't want to spoil that just because another country had better conditions. If I had played for Great Britain, of course I would have played exactly as I do for my country but deep inside, I would never have felt that I belonged. I was the one who took the decision.[55]

2007: Top 10 and first Masters title

Djokovic began 2007 by defeating Australian Chris Guccione in the final of the tournament in Adelaide, before losing in the fourth round of the Australian Open to eventual champion Roger Federer[56] in straight sets. His performances at the Masters Series events in Indian Wells, and Key Biscayne, where he was the runner-up and champion respectively, pushed him into the world's top 10.[51] Djokovic lost the Indian Wells final to Rafael Nadal, but defeated Nadal in Key Biscayne in the quarterfinals before defeating Guillermo Cañas for the title in the finals.[57]

After winning his first Master Series title, Djokovic returned to Serbia to help his country enter the Davis Cup World Group[58] in a match against Georgia. Djokovic won a point by defeating Georgia's George Chanturia.[59] Later, he played in the Monte Carlo Masters, where he was defeated by David Ferrer in the third round, and at the Estoril Open, where he defeated Richard Gasquet in the final.[60] Djokovic then reached the quarterfinals of both the Internazionali d'Italia in Rome, where he lost to Nadal, and the Hamburg Masters, where he was defeated by Carlos Moyà. At the French Open, Djokovic reached his first major semi-final, losing to eventual champion Nadal.[61]

At Wimbledon, Djokovic won a five-hour quarterfinal against Marcos Baghdatis. In his semi-final match against Nadal, he retired with elbow problems in the third set, after winning the first and losing the second set.[62]

Djokovic during his first round match against Robin Haase at the 2007 US Open

Djokovic's next tournament was the Rogers Cup in Montreal, and he defeated No. 3 Andy Roddick in the quarterfinals, No. 2 Nadal in the semi-finals, and No. 1 Federer in the final. This was the first time a player had defeated the top three ranked players in one tournament since Boris Becker in 1994.[63] Djokovic was also only the second player, after Tomáš Berdych, to have defeated both Federer and Nadal since they became the top two players in the world. After this tournament, Björn Borg stated that Djokovic "is definitely a contender to win a Grand Slam (tournament)."[64] The following week at the Cincinnati Masters, Djokovic lost in the second round to Moyà in straight sets. Nevertheless, he went on to reach the final of the US Open, where he had five set points in the first set and two in the second set, but lost them all before losing the match in straight sets to the top-seeded Federer.[65]

Djokovic won his fifth title of the year at the BA-CA TennisTrophy in Vienna, defeating Stanislas Wawrinka in the final. His next tournament was the Madrid Masters, where he lost to David Nalbandian in the semi-finals. Djokovic, assured of finishing the year ranked No. 3, qualified for the year-ending Tennis Masters Cup, but did not advance beyond the round robin matches. He received the Golden Badge award for the best athlete in Serbia, and the Olympic Committee of Serbia declared him the best athlete in the country.[66]

Djokovic played a key role in the 2007 play-off win over Australia by winning all his matches and helping promote the Serbia Davis Cup team to the 2008 World Group.[67] In Serbia's tie against Russia in Moscow in early 2008, Djokovic was sidelined due to influenza and missed his first singles match. He returned to win his doubles match, teaming with Nenad Zimonjić, before retiring during his singles match with Nikolay Davydenko.[68]

2008: First Major title

Djokovic started the year by playing the Hopman Cup with fellow Serbian world No. 3 Jelena Janković. While he won all his round-robin matches, the team lost 1–2 in the final to the second-seeded American team of Serena Williams and Mardy Fish. At the Australian Open, Djokovic reached his second consecutive Grand Slam final without dropping a set, including a victory over two-time defending champion Federer in the semi-finals.[69] By reaching the semi-finals, Djokovic became the youngest player to have reached the semi-finals in all four Grand Slam events.[70] In the final, Djokovic defeated unseeded Frenchman Jo-Wilfried Tsonga in four sets to earn his first Grand Slam singles title.[71] This marked the first time since the 2005 Australian Open that a Grand Slam singles title was not won by Federer or Nadal.[71]

Djokovic's next tournament was the Dubai Tennis Championships, where he lost in the semi-finals to Roddick. At the Pacific Life Masters in Indian Wells, Djokovic won his ninth career singles title, defeating Mardy Fish in the final.[72] Djokovic won his tenth career singles title and fourth Master Series singles crown at the Internazionali d'Italia in Rome after defeating Wawrinka in the final.[73] The following week at the Hamburg Masters, he lost to Nadal in the semi-finals. At the French Open, Djokovic was the third-seeded player behind Federer and Nadal. He lost to Nadal in the semi-finals in straight sets.[74]

On grass, Djokovic once again played Nadal, this time in the Artois Championships final in Queen's Club, where he lost in two sets. Djokovic entered Wimbledon seeded third but lost in the second round to Safin, ending a streak of five consecutive majors where he had reached at least the semi-finals.[75]

Djokovic then failed to defend his 2007 singles title at the Rogers Cup in Toronto – he was eliminated in the quarterfinals by eighth-seeded Andy Murray. The following week at the Cincinnati Masters, Djokovic advanced to the final, beating Nadal in the semifinals and thereby ending the Spaniard's 32 match winning streak. In the final, he again lost to Murray in straight sets. His next tournament was the 2008 Summer Olympics, his first Olympics. He and Nenad Zimonjić, seeded second in men's doubles, were eliminated in the first round by the Czech pairing of Martin Damm and Pavel Vízner. Seeded third in singles, Djokovic lost in the semi-finals to Nadal. Djokovic then defeated James Blake, the loser of the other semi-final, in the bronze medal match.[76]

After the Olympics, Djokovic entered the US Open seeded third, where he defeated Roddick in the quarterfinals. To a smattering of boos in a post-match interview, Djokovic criticized Roddick for accusing him of making excessive use of the trainer during matches.[77] His run at the US Open ended in the semi-finals when he lost to Federer in four sets, in a rematch of the previous year's final. Djokovic went on to play four tournaments after the US Open. At the Thailand Open, he lost to Tsonga in straight sets. In November, Djokovic was the second seed at the year-ending Tennis Masters Cup in Shanghai. In his first round-robin match, he defeated Argentine Juan Martín del Potro in straight sets. He then beat Nikolay Davydenko in three sets, before losing his final round-robin match against Tsonga. Djokovic qualified for the semi-finals, where he defeated Gilles Simon. In the final, Djokovic defeated Davydenko to win his first Tennis Masters Cup title.[78]

2009: Ten finals, five titles

Djokovic started the year at the Brisbane International, where he was upset by Ernests Gulbis in the first round.[79] At the Sydney International, he lost to Jarkko Nieminen in the semi-finals.[80] As defending champion at the Australian Open, Djokovic retired from his quarterfinal match with former world No. 1 Andy Roddick.

After losing in the semi-finals of the Open 13 tournament in Marseille to Tsonga, Djokovic won the singles title at the Dubai Tennis Championships, defeating Ferrer to claim his twelfth career title.[81] The following week, Djokovic was the defending champion at the BNP Paribas Open in Indian Wells, but lost to Roddick in the quarterfinals. At the Sony Ericsson Open in Key Biscayne, Djokovic beat Federer in the semi-finals, before losing to Murray in the final.[82]

Djokovic reached the final of the next ATP World Tour Masters 1000 event, the Monte-Carlo Rolex Masters on clay, losing to Nadal in the final. At the Internazionali BNL d'Italia in Rome, Djokovic failed to defend the title he had won the previous year, losing in the final.[83]

Djokovic was the top seed at his hometown tournament, the Serbia Open in Belgrade. He defeated first-time finalist Łukasz Kubot to win his second title of the year.[84] As third seed at the Madrid Open, Djokovic advanced to the semi-finals without dropping a set. There, he faced Nadal and lost despite holding three match points. The match, at 4 hours and 3 minutes, was the longest three-set singles match on the ATP World Tour in the Open Era.[85] At the French Open, he lost in the third round to German Philipp Kohlschreiber.

Djokovic began his grass court season at the Gerry Weber Open where, after the withdrawal of Federer, he competed as the top seed. He advanced to the final, where he lost to German Tommy Haas.[86] Djokovic then lost to Haas in the quarterfinals of Wimbledon.[87]

During the US Open Series, Djokovic made the quarterfinals of the Rogers Cup in Montreal before losing to Roddick. At the Cincinnati Masters, Djokovic defeated third-ranked Nadal in the semi-finals before losing in the final to No. 1 Federer.[88] At the US Open, Djokovic made the semi-finals, having dropped only two sets, defeating Ivan Ljubičić, 15th seed Radek Štěpánek and 10th seed Fernando Verdasco before being defeated by Federer.[89]

At the China Open in Beijing, Djokovic defeated Victor Hănescu, Viktor Troicki, Verdasco, and Robin Söderling en route to the final, where he defeated Marin Čilić in straight sets to win his third title of the year.[90] Djokovic then lost in the semi-finals of the inaugural Shanghai ATP Masters 1000 to Davydenko. At the Swiss Indoors in Basel, Djokovic defeated Jan Hernych to make it to the quarterfinals,[91] where he recovered from a deficit to defeat Wawrinka before going on to win his semi-final against Štěpánek. In the final, he defeated home favourite and three-time defending champion Federer to win his fourth title of the year.[92] At the last Masters 1000 event of the year at the BNP Paribas Masters in Paris, Djokovic won his first Masters 1000 title of the year by defeating Nadal in the semi-finals,[93] before outlasting Gaël Monfils in the final.[94]

Coming into the year-ending ATP World Tour Finals in London as the defending champion, Djokovic defeated Davydenko in his first round-robin match[95] before losing his second match to Söderling.[96] Despite victory over Nadal in his third round-robin match, Djokovic failed to make the semi-finals.[97]

Djokovic ended the year as the No. 3 for the third consecutive year, having played 97 matches, the most of any player on the ATP World Tour, with a 78–19 win-loss record. In addition to leading the ATP World Tour in match wins, he reached a career best ten finals, winning five titles. Djokovic also played a large role in promoting Serbia to the 2009 World Group. On 6–8 March 2010, he played a key role in bringing Serbia to the World Group quarterfinals for the first time in its independent history, winning both singles matches in the home tie against the United States against Sam Querrey and John Isner.[98]

2010: Davis Cup title & US Open runner-up

Djokovic started his year by playing in the AAMI Classic, an exhibition event. In his first match, he defeated Haas before losing to Fernando Verdasco in his second.[99] At the 2010 Australian Open, Djokovic lost a five-setter to Tsonga in the quarterfinals.[100] Despite the loss, he attained a career-high ranking of No. 2 and went on to reach the semi-finals of the ABN AMRO World Tennis Tournament in Rotterdam, where he lost to Youzhny. At the Dubai Tennis Championships, Djokovic reached the final, this time defeating Youzhny to win his first title of the year.[101]

Djokovic then took part in Serbia's Davis Cup tie against the United States on clay in Belgrade and helped his country reach its first quarterfinal in the Davis Cup with a 3–2 victory, defeating Querrey and Isner. At the Indian Wells Masters, Djokovic lost in the fourth round to Ljubičić. At the Miami Masters, he lost in his opening match to Olivier Rochus. Djokovic then announced that he had ceased working with Todd Martin as his coach.[102]

In his first clay-court tournament of the year at the Monte-Carlo Rolex Masters, top-seeded Djokovic reached the semi-finals with wins over Wawrinka and David Nalbandian before losing to Verdasco. Djokovic again lost to Verdasco at the Internazionali BNL d'Italia in Rome, this time in the quarterfinals.[103] As the defending champion at his hometown event, the Serbia Open in Belgrade, he withdrew in the quarterfinals while trailing Filip Krajinović.[104]

Djokovic entered the French Open seeded third. He defeated Evgeny Korolev, Kei Nishikori, Victor Hănescu, and Robby Ginepri en route to the quarterfinals, where he lost to Jürgen Melzer in five sets.[105] Djokovic entered Wimbledon as the third seed, defeating Rochus, Taylor Dent, Albert Montañés, Lleyton Hewitt, and Yen-Hsun Lu en route to the semi-finals, which he lost to Tomáš Berdych in straight sets.[106]

Djokovic then competed at the Rogers Cup in Toronto, where he lost to Federer in the semi-finals. Djokovic also competed in doubles with Nadal in a one-time, high-profile partnership. This had not happened since 1976, when Jimmy Connors and Arthur Ashe as No. 1 and No. 2 paired together as a doubles team.[107] They lost in the first round to Canadians Milos Raonic and Vasek Pospisil. Djokovic then lost to Roddick in the quarterfinals of the Cincinnati Masters.[108]

Djokovic at the 2010 US Open

As the third seed at the US Open, Djokovic came very close to losing in his opening round against Viktor Troicki in extreme heat. He then defeated Philipp Petzschner, James Blake, Mardy Fish, and No. 17 seed Gaël Monfils, all in straight sets, to reach the US Open semi-finals for the fourth consecutive year. There, he defeated Federer in five sets after saving two match points with forehand winners while serving to stay in the match at 4–5 in the 5th set. It was Djokovic's first victory over Federer at the US Open in four attempts, and his first victory over Federer in a Major since the 2008 Australian Open. Djokovic went on to lose to Nadal in the final, a match that saw Nadal complete his career Grand Slam.[109]

After helping Serbia defeat the Czech Republic 3–2 to make it to the Davis Cup final, Djokovic competed at the China Open as the top seed and defending champion. He won the title for the second successive year, after defeating Maoxin Gong, Mardy Fish (walkover), Gilles Simon, and John Isner en route to the final. Djokovic then defeated Ferrer in the final. At the Shanghai Masters, Djokovic made a semi-final appearance, losing to Federer. Djokovic played his final tournament of the year at the ATP World Tour Finals in London. Djokovic was placed in Group A along with Nadal, Berdych, and Roddick. Djokovic won his first round-robin match against Berdych. He next lost to Nadal. He defeated Roddick in his final round-robin match and advanced to the semi-finals, where he lost to Federer in two sets.[110]

Djokovic went on to win his two singles rubbers in Serbia's Davis Cup finals victory over France. This started a long unbeaten run that went on into 2011. Djokovic finished the year ranked No. 3, his fourth successive finish at this position. He was awarded the title "Serbian Sportsman of the year" by the Olympic Committee of Serbia and "Serbian Athlete of the year" by DSL Sport.

Serbia progressed to the Davis Cup final, following the victories over Croatia (4–1) and the Czech Republic (3–2). Serbia came from 1–2 down to defeat France in the final tie 3–2 in Belgrade to win the nation's first Davis Cup Championship. In the final, Djokovic scored two singles points for Serbia, defeating Gilles Simon and Gaël Monfils.[111] He was the backbone of the Serbian squad, going 7–0 in singles rubbers to lead the nation to the title, although the honour of winning the deciding rubber in the final went to compatriot Viktor Troicki.

2011: Three Majors and No. 1 ranking

Djokovic celebrates upon defeating Jo-Wilfried Tsonga and clinching the world No. 1 ranking following his victory in the semi-finals of the 2011 Wimbledon Championships.

Djokovic won ten tournaments in 2011,[32] including Grand Slam tournament victories at the Australian Open, Wimbledon and the US Open.[32] Djokovic also captured a record-breaking five ATP World Tour Masters 1000 titles,[32][112] and set a new record for the most prize money won in a single season on the ATP World Tour ($12 million).[32] His level dropped at season's end beginning with a back injury and ended with a poor showing at the ATP World Tour Finals. Djokovic finished the season with a 70–6 record and a year-end ranking of No. 1.

Pete Sampras declared Djokovic's 2011 season as the best he has ever seen in his lifetime, calling it "one of the best achievements in all of sports."[113] Boris Becker called Djokovic's season "one of the very best years in tennis of all time", adding that it "may not be the best statistically, but he's beaten Federer, he's beaten Nadal, he's beaten everybody that came around to challenge him in the biggest tournaments in the world."[114] Rafael Nadal, who lost to Djokovic in six finals on three different surfaces, described Djokovic's performances as "probably the highest level of tennis that I ever saw."[115] Djokovic was named 2011 ITF World Champion.[116] He also received the Golden Bagel Award by winning 13 sets with the result of 6–0 during the season.[117]

In the semi-finals of the 2011 Davis Cup, Djokovic played a crucial rubber match for Serbia against Juan Martín del Potro of Argentina, where he retired while trailing, after reaggravating a back injury sustained during the US Open tournament. This secured Argentina's place in the final. This marked Djokovic's third loss of his 2011 season, and his second retirement.[118]

2012: Third Australian Open title and year-end No. 1

Djokovic began his season by winning the 2012 Australian Open. He won his first four rounds against Paolo Lorenzi,[119] Santiago Giraldo, Nicolas Mahut and Lleyton Hewitt, respectively. In the quarterfinals he defeated David Ferrer in three sets. In the semi-final, Djokovic beat Murray in five sets after 4 hours and 50 minutes, coming back from a two-sets-to-one deficit and fending off break points at 5-all in the fifth set.[120] In the final, Djokovic beat Nadal in five sets, coming from a break down in the final set to win 7–5. At 5 hours and 53 minutes, the match was the longest final in Open Era Grand Slam history, as well as the longest match in Australian Open history, surpassing the 5-hour and 14-minute 2009 semi-final between Nadal and Fernando Verdasco.[121]

Djokovic was beaten by John Isner in the semi-finals at Indian Wells. He successfully defended his title in Miami. In the Monte Carlo final, he lost in straight sets to Nadal, unable to prevent Nadal from earning his record-breaking eighth consecutive title there. Djokovic also lost in straight sets to Nadal at the Rome Masters 2012 final.[122]

Djokovic reached his maiden French Open final in 2012 by defeating Federer,[123] reaching the finals of all four majors consecutively. Djokovic had the chance to become the first man since Rod Laver in 1969 to hold all four major titles at once, having won last year's Wimbledon and US Open titles as well as this year's Australian Open, but was beaten by Nadal in the final in four sets.[124][125] Following the French Open, Djokovic was unsuccessful in defending his Wimbledon title from the prior year, losing to Roger Federer in four sets in the semi-finals.

At the 2012 Summer Olympics in London, Djokovic was chosen as the flag bearer for Serbia.[126] On 2 August 2012, Djokovic defeated French fifth seed Tsonga and advanced to the semi-finals of Olympics, where he was beaten by Murray in straight sets.[127] In the bronze medal match he lost to Del Potro, finishing 4th.[128] He successively defended his Rogers Cup title, dropping just a single set to Tommy Haas. Following the Rogers Cup, Djokovic would make the finals of the Cincinnati Masters but lost to Roger Federer in straight sets.[129]

At the US Open on 9 September, Djokovic reached his third consecutive final at Flushing Meadows by beating fourth-seeded David Ferrer in a match suspended a day earlier due to rain.[130][131] He then lost the final to Murray in five sets.[132] Djokovic went on to defend his China Open title, defeating Tsonga in straight sets.[133] The following week he won the Shanghai Masters by defeating Murray in the final.[134] With Federer's withdrawal from the Paris Masters, Djokovic was guaranteed to regain his No. 1 ranking.[135] On 12 November 2012, Djokovic won the 2012 ATP World Tour Finals by defeating Federer in the final.[136][137][138] Because of his achievements in the 2012 season, Djokovic was named the 2012 ITF World Champion in men's singles by the International Tennis Federation.[139]

2013: Fourth Australian Open title

Djokovic began the 2013 season by defeating Murray in the final of the 2013 Australian Open to win a record third consecutive Australian Open trophy and the sixth major of his career.[140] A week later, he participated in a Davis Cup match against Belgium, where he defeated Olivier Rochus in straight sets to give the Serbian team a 2–0 lead.[141]

On 2 March 2013, Djokovic won the thirty-sixth professional single's title of his career by defeating Tomáš Berdych in the final of the Dubai Tennis Championships.[142] Another solid week of tennis saw Djokovic reach the semi-finals at the BNP Paribas Open in Indian Wells, before losing to del Potro, bringing an end to his twenty-two match winning streak.[143] The following week, Djokovic went into the Miami Masters as defending champion, but lost in the fourth round to Tommy Haas in straight sets.[144]

In April, Djokovic played for Serbia as the country faced the United States in the Davis Cup quarterfinals. Djokovic clinched the tie for his team by defeating John Isner and Sam Querrey.[145][146] Later that month, he defeated eight-time champion Nadal in straight sets in the final of the Monte-Carlo Rolex Masters to clinch his first title in Monte Carlo.[147] In May, he was defeated by Grigor Dimitrov in three sets in the second round of the Mutua Madrid Open in Madrid.[148] The following week, he lost to Berdych at the quarterfinal stage of the Rome Masters.[149]

Djokovic began his French Open campaign with a straight three sets win over David Goffin in the first round and also defeated Guido Pella in straight sets in the second round. In the third round, Djokovic defeated Dimitrov in three sets.[150] In the fourth round he came back from a set down and defeated Philipp Kohlschreiber of Germany in four sets[151] and in the process he had reached a 16th consecutive Grand Slam quarterfinal. Djokovic then lost to Nadal in the semi-final in five sets.[152]

In the finals of the 2013 Wimbledon Championships, Djokovic lost to Murray in straight sets. At the Rogers Cup, he lost to Nadal in the semi-final in three sets. Later, Djokovic lost to Isner in the quarterfinals in Cincinnati. Djokovic went on to reach the US Open final, where he met Nadal for the 37th time in his career (a new open era record). He went on to lose in four sets.[153] In early October, Djokovic collected his fourth Beijing title by defeating Nadal in the final in straight sets. He also collected his second Shanghai Rolex Masters title, extending his winning streak to 20–0 over the last 2 seasons at the hard court Asian swing of the tour.[154] Djokovic won his 16 Masters 1000 title in Paris at the end of the season, beating David Ferrer in the final.[155] At the 2013 ATP World Tour Finals Djokovic retained the trophy, beating Nadal in straight sets.[156] At the end of the season, Boris Becker joined his staff as head coach.

2014: Second Wimbledon title and return to No. 1

Djokovic began the year with a warmup tournament win, the 2013 Mubadala World Tennis Championship. At the Australian Open, he won his first four matches in straight sets, against Lukáš Lacko, Leonardo Mayer, Denis Istomin and No. 15 seed Fabio Fognini respectively. He met Wawrinka in the quarterfinals of the tournament, the second consecutive year the two had met at the event. Despite coming back from two sets to one down, Djokovic fell 9–7 in the fifth set, ending his 25–match winning streak in Melbourne, as well as his streak of 14 consecutive Grand Slam tournament semi-finals.[157] The week of 27 January marked the first time since 2011 that Djokovic has not been a Grand Slam title holder.

Djokovic also would play in the Dubai Tennis Championships but lost to eventual champion Roger Federer in the semi-finals. However, Djokovic would avenge his loss to Federer, winning his third Indian Wells Masters title, beating Federer in the final. Continuing his good run, he beat No. 1 Nadal in the final of the Miami Masters in straight sets.[158] Suffering from a wrist injury which hampered him throughout the Monte-Carlo Masters, Djokovic lost the semi-finals to Federer in straight sets. After returning from injury, Djokovic won his third Rome title by beating Nadal in the final of the Italian Open.[159] He subsequently donated the $500,000 in prize money that he had received to the victims of the 2014 Southeast Europe floods.[160]

Djokovic reached the final of the French Open losing only two sets in six matches, but lost in the final to Nadal in four sets. It was Djokovic's first defeat in the last 5 matches between both. At the Wimbledon Championships Djokovic defeated Roger Federer in the final in five sets. With this victory he replaced Rafael Nadal again as the world No. 1.[161] Djokovic played at the Rogers Cup, losing to eventual first-time champion Jo-Wilfried Tsonga in straight sets.[162] He followed that with a loss to Tommy Robredo at the Cincinnati Masters. At the US Open, Djokovic reached the semi-finals, where he lost in four sets to Kei Nishikori.[163]

Djokovic returned to Beijing with a fifth trophy in six years, defeating Murray in the semi-final and Berdych in the final.[164] The following week he was beaten by Federer in the semi-final of Shanghai Masters. He then won the Paris Bercy masters title, without losing a single set, beating Raonic in the final.[165]

In the World Tour Finals, Djokovic created a record by winning three round robin matches with a loss of just nine games. By reaching the semi-final, he also secured the year-end No. 1 ranking for the third time, tying him with Nadal at fifth position. He was awarded the World Tour Finals trophy after Federer withdrew before the finals.[166] This marked the 7th title of the season for him and the 4th title at the World Tour Finals.

2015: One of the greatest tennis seasons of all time

Djokovic began the season at the Qatar Open in Doha, where he won his first two rounds for the loss of just 6 games, however lost in the quarterfinals against Ivo Karlović in three tight sets. He rebounded from this defeat well at the Australian Open, where he made it through the first five rounds without dropping a set. In the semi-finals he faced defending champion Stan Wawrinka, the man who beat him the previous year. He twice lost a set lead, however came roaring back in the fifth to take it to love, and set up a third final against Andy Murray. After splitting the first two sets in tiebreakers, Djokovic suddenly found his form after dropping his serve at the start of the third set, going on to win 12 of the last 13 games to record a four set victory over the Scot, and win an Open Era record-breaking fifth title in Melbourne, overtaking Roger Federer and Andre Agassi.[167] He moved into equal eighth on the all-time list of men with the most Major titles, tying Agassi, Ivan Lendl, Jimmy Connors, Ken Rosewall and Fred Perry.[168]

He next competed at the Dubai Tennis Championships and lost to Roger Federer in the final.[169] After 2 weeks, Djokovic defeated John Isner and Andy Murray en route to his 21st Masters 1000 title, beating Federer in three sets in Indian Wells.[170] In Miami, he defeated David Ferrer and John Isner en route to winning his fifth title defeating Andy Murray in three sets. With his 22nd Masters title, Djokovic became the first player to complete the Indian Wells – Miami title sweep three times.[171][172] In April, Djokovic clinched his second Monte-Carlo Masters by beating Tomas Berdych in the final.[173] Djokovic withdrew from the 2015 Madrid Masters.[174] He won the title for the fourth time at the Rome Masters, making it 4 out of 4 titles in Masters 1000 events entered by Djokovic in 2015.

Djokovic during his match against Bernard Tomic at the 2015 Wimbledon

He continued his good form on clay at the French Open, by reaching the final without dropping a set in the first five rounds, including a quarterfinal clash with Nadal and a five set semi-final victory over No. 3 seed Andy Murray which took two days to complete. This meant he became only the second man to have won against Nadal at the French Open. However, he lost the next match and the tournament to No. 8 seed Stan Wawrinka in four sets, after having prevailed in the first set and being up a break in the fourth set and up 40–0 on Wawrinka's serve in a subsequent game. He lost six of the final seven games of the match. With this loss, Djokovic was denied his first victory at the French Open and a personal career Grand Slam.[175] Five weeks later, he rebounded again from a tough loss in Paris, just like 2014, coming from two sets down to beat Kevin Anderson in the fourth round, and then going on to claim his third Wimbledon title in his fourth final at the All England Club, with a four set win over Roger Federer.[176]

Prior to the final Grand Slam event of the year, Djokovic had the chance to become the first man in history to complete the full set of Masters 1000 titles in Cincinnati, and reached the final for the fifth time, however he was once again beaten by Federer, making it a fifth straight defeat in a Cincinnati final.[177] At the 2015 US Open, Djokovic reached the final for the sixth time in his career, achieving the feat of reaching all four grand slam finals in a single calendar year. In the final of the tournament, he faced Federer once again, defeating him in four sets to win his third grand slam title of the year, his second title at Flushing Meadows, and his tenth career Grand Slam singles title, becoming the fifth man in the Open Era to win ten or more Grand Slam singles titles, as well as only the third man to reach all four Major finals in a calendar year.[178]

He returned to Beijing in October, winning the title for the sixth time, defeating Nadal in straight sets in the final to bring his overall record at the tournament to 29–0.[179] Djokovic then reached the final of the Paris Masters, where he defeated Murray in straight sets, taking his fourth title there and a record sixth ATP Masters 1000 tournament in one year.[180] After losing to Federer in the round-robin stage of the 2015 ATP World Tour Finals he took on the third seed again in the final. He beat Federer in straight sets winning his fifth World Tour Finals title and he became the first player to win four consecutive end-of-year finals tournaments.[181]

2016: 'Nole' Slam and ranking points record

Djokovic collected his 60th career title in Doha, defeating Nadal in two sets in a final that lasted 73 minutes. He broke his own ATP ranking points record, bringing it up to 16,790. Djokovic then proceeded to win his sixth Australian Open. On his road to his Open Era record sixth title in Melbourne, he defeated Roger Federer in four sets in the semi-finals, and in a rematch of the 2015 final, he defeated Andy Murray, in three straight sets.[182] He quickly rebounded from an eye infection at the Dubai open to collect a fifth Indian Wells Masters title, defeating Rafael Nadal in the semi-finals, and Milos Raonic in the final. Djokovic's run was so dominant that Nos. 2 and 3 (Andy Murray and Roger Federer) could have combined their points and still not have had enough to pass him.[183]

Djokovic winning the 2016 French Open and completing the career slam

On 3 April 2016, Djokovic won the 2016 Miami Open for the third consecutive year, and did so without dropping a set en route to his sixth career Miami Open title, tying him with Andre Agassi for most ever Miami Open men's singles titles.[184] In addition, 2016 marked the third consecutive year that Djokovic swept both Indian Wells and the Miami Open, the first male singles player to ever do that. This was also the fourth time in his career Djokovic won both Miami and Indian Wells back-to-back. His finals win in Miami saw Djokovic surpass Roger Federer to become the all-time leading prize money winner on the ATP tour with career earnings of $98.2 million.[185] After an early round exit at the Monte Carlo Masters,[186] Djokovic quickly bounced back by winning the Madrid title for the second time in his career with a three set victory over Murray.[187] They met again in the Rome Masters final one week later with Murray the victor, despite a sluggish performance, Djokovic defeated Nadal and Nishikori in two long quarterfinals and semi-finals.[188]

Djokovic defeated Andy Murray in the final of the 2016 French Open in four sets, making him the reigning champion of all four major tournaments, a historic feat the media dubbed the "Nole Slam."[189][190] With his French Open triumph, Djokovic became the 8th player in history (and the second oldest) to achieve a Career Grand Slam, the third player in history to hold all four Grand Slam titles at the same time, and the first player to win $100 million in prize money.[191] However, at Wimbledon, his major win streak came to an end in the third-round when he lost to American Sam Querrey in four sets. It was his earliest exit in a Grand Slam since the 2009 French Open.[192]

In late July, Djokovic returned to form by winning his fourth Rogers cup title, and 30th Masters 1000 title overall, without dropping a set.[193] In August, Novak was beaten in the first round of the Olympic men's singles in Rio de Janeiro by Juan Martín del Potro. It was Djokovic's first opening round defeat since January 2009, when Ernest Gulbis defeated him at the 2009 Brisbane International.[194][195] In the final slam of the year, the US Open, Djokovic advanced to the final but was defeated by Stan Wawrinka in four sets.[196] Djokovic was defeated by Roberto Bautista Agut and Marin Cilic in the semi-finals and quarterfinals in Shanghai and Paris. As a result of this, he lost the No. 1 ranking to Andy Murray.[197] However, a runner-up finish at the World Tour Finals indicated his best performances in nearly three months. After the season, he parted ways with his coach of three years, Boris Becker.[198]

2017: Split with team and long injury hiatus

In January, Djokovic defended his title in Doha defeating new world No. 1 Andy Murray in three sets. At the 2017 Australian Open, he was upset in the second round by No. 117 Denis Istomin of Uzbekistan. This was the first time since 2007 that Djokovic had failed to reach the quarterfinals at the Australian Open, and the first time ever in his career that he had lost to a player ranked outside of the top 100 in a Grand Slam tournament.[199] In February and March, Djokovic played at the Mexican Open and the Indian Well Masters, but in both events was eliminated by Nick Kyrgios, in the third and fourth rounds, respectively. In April, Djokovic reached the quarterfinals of the Monte-Carlo Masters, losing to David Goffin. After the tournament, he decided to split with his long-time coach Marián Vajda, fitness specialist Gebhard Phil-Gritsch and physioterapeut Miljan Amanović, citing the need to find a winning spark. A better showing at the Madrid Masters saw Djokovic reach the semi-finals, losing to Nadal in straight sets.[200] A runner-up result at the Rome Masters indicated solid improvements in his form.

On 21 May 2017, he announced that Andre Agassi would become his new coach, starting at the 2017 French Open. However, as the defending champion, he lost at Roland Garros in the quarterfinals to Dominic Thiem.[201] He prepared for Wimbledon at the Eastbourne International, playing his first non-Wimbledon tournament on grass since the 2010 Aegon Championships. He won the tournament, beating Gaël Monfils in the final. This marked his first grass title outside of Wimbledon. He made it to the quarterfinals at Wimbledon before retiring against Tomas Berdych while down a set and a break, due to an elbow injury which he said had been bothering him for a year and a half.[202]

On 26 July, Djokovic announced that he would miss the 2017 US Open and the rest of the 2017 season to fully recover from his elbow injury.[203]

2018: Surgery, two Majors, back to No. 1 and the Career Golden Masters

In January he won against Dominic Thiem in straight sets at the Kooyong Classic exhibition tournament. At the 2018 Australian Open, the Serbian won in the second round against Gael Monfils and then in the third round eliminated Albert Ramos Viñolas in straight sets, before bowing out in close straight sets against Chung Hyeon from South Korea. In late January, he underwent surgery on his elbow.[204] On 3 March, he announced on Twitter he was back on the practice courts,[205] and with a little over one week practice, he surprisingly played Indian Wells, losing in the second round to Taro Daniel.[206] He later had another second-round loss in the Miami Open, this time to Benoît Paire.[207]

Reuniting with Marián Vajda, at the Monte Carlo Masters, he collected victories over Dusan Lajovic and Borna Coric, followed by a loss to world no. 7 Dominic Thiem. In a press conference, he stated, "After two years finally I can play without pain."[208] After another early exit, this time in Barcelona to Martin Klizan,[209] Djokovic's gradual return to form would show itself at the Madrid Masters. In his first win over a top 20 player in 10 months, he defeated Monte Carlo Masters runner-up Kei Nishikori in straight sets, but did not progress past the second round, losing to Kyle Edmund in three sets.[210][211] Going into the Rome Masters with a 6–6 season record, he reached the semifinals, losing to Rafael Nadal in straight sets.[212] He later reached the quarterfinals of the 2018 French Open, where he lost to Marco Cecchinato in four sets.[213]

He had a strong start to the grass court season at Queen's Club, securing his first win over a top 5 player in almost 18 months after defeating Grigor Dimitrov in the second round. He then defeated Adrian Mannarino and Jérémy Chardy without dropping a set to reach the final where, despite having a championship point, he lost to top seed Marin Čilić.[214] He also played doubles partnering with longtime friend and rival Wawrinka.

Djokovic entered Wimbledon as the #12 seed. He defeated Tennys Sandgren, Horacio Zeballos, Kyle Edmund, Karen Khachanov, and Kei Nishikori to reach the semifinals, where he faced long-time rival Rafael Nadal. Djokovic defeated Nadal 10–8 in the fifth set in a 5-hour, 17-minute match, spread over two days. This match became the second-longest semifinal in Wimbledon history, second only to the match between Kevin Anderson and John Isner held earlier on the same day. With this win, Djokovic reached his first major final since the 2016 US Open.[215] He claimed his fourth Wimbledon title and 13th major title overall by defeating Anderson in straight sets after 2 hours and 18 minutes, winning the third set in a tiebreak after saving five set points throughout the set. With this win, he rose 11 ranking spots and re-entered the top 10 for the first time since October 2017.[216]

After a triumphant grass season, Djokovic started his North American hardcourt swing with a third round showing at the Rogers Cup, losing against eventual runner-up Stefanos Tsitsipas in a 2-hour, 16-minute three-setter. Afterwards, he returned to play the Cincinnati Masters for the first time in three years. In an event plagued by suspended play due to rain, Djokovic defeated defending champion Grigor Dimitrov in the third round and Milos Raonic in the quarterfinals back to back in three sets. Djokovic went on to defeat Marin Cilic in the semifinals in a fourth consecutive three set match, setting up his sixth appearance at the finals of the tournament and fourth final against seven-time champion Roger Federer. Although Federer was riding a streak of 100 consecutive holds of serve at the tournament,[217] Djokovic went on to break his serve three times and win his first Cincinnati Masters title convincingly in straight sets. With this victory, Djokovic became the first (and, as of 2019, only) player in tennis history to complete the career Golden Masters—a feat achieved by winning all nine ATP Masters 1000 events at least once in one's career.[218]

Djokovic was the #6 seed entering the US Open. This was his first appearance at the US Open since the 2016 final. He defeated Márton Fucsovics, Tennys Sandgren, Richard Gasquet, and João Sousa to reach the quarterfinals, where he was expected to face Roger Federer; however, Federer was upset by John Millman, who Djokovic then defeated in straight sets. Djokovic thus advanced to his eleventh US Open semifinal in as many appearances. He overcame Kei Nishikori in straight sets to reach his eighth US Open final, where he faced #3 seed Juan Martín del Potro. He defeated del Potro in straight sets to win his third US Open title and second Grand Slam title of the year. This win returned him to the top 3 in the world rankings for the first time since the 2017 French Open.[219]

Seeded second at the Shanghai Masters, he defeated Jérémy Chardy, 16th seed Marco Cecchinato, 7th seed Kevin Anderson, 4th seed Alexander Zverev, and 13th seed Borna Ćorić in a decisive run. He did not drop a set nor have his serve broken during the tournament. This was his fourth title in Shanghai and second Masters title of the year. With this win, he overtook Roger Federer and returned to the #2 ranking for the first time since the 2017 French Open.[220] On 31 October, Rafael Nadal announced his withdrawal from the 2018 Paris Masters due to an abdominal injury. As a result, Djokovic reclaimed the World No. 1 ranking.[221]

At the Paris Masters, Djokovic was seeded second. He defeated João Sousa, Damir Džumhur, and fifth seed Marin Čilić to reach the semifinals, where he faced third seed Roger Federer. They fought a tight three set match, with Djokovic emerging victorious in the third set tiebreak. In the final, Djokovic was upset by unseeded Karen Khachanov in straight sets.[222]

At the ATP Finals, Djokovic was seeded first, and drawn in Group Guga Kuerten. With the withdrawal of Rafael Nadal from the event, Djokovic was guaranteed a fifth year-end number one ranking. In the round robin stage, he dominated his opponents, defeating Alexander Zverev, Marin Čilić, and John Isner without dropping a set. He advanced to the semifinals, where he decisively defeated Kevin Anderson in straight sets to reach his seventh final at the tournament, and his sixth in as many appearances, where he faced Alexander Zverev. He was upset by Zverev in straight sets.[223] Nonetheless, his performance at the ATP Finals saw him secure an almost 1,600 point lead over no. 2 ranked Nadal. At the Mubadala World Tennis Championship, he scored victories over Karen Khachanov & Kevin Anderson to win the title. He ended the year with 9,045 points.

2019: 7th Australian Open title and 5th Wimbledon title

Djokovic's first tournament of the year was at the Qatar Open. He defeated Damir Džumhur, Márton Fucsovics, and fifth seed Nikoloz Basilashvili before being defeated by seventh seed Roberto Bautista Agut in the semifinals.

Djokovic entered the Australian Open as the top seed. He defeated qualifier Mitchell Krueger, 2008 finalist Jo-Wilfried Tsonga, 25th seed Denis Shapovalov, 15th seed Daniil Medvedev, 8th seed Kei Nishikori, and 28th seed Lucas Pouille to reach the final, in which he beat 2nd seed Rafael Nadal in straight sets to win his 15th Grand Slam and a record 7th Australian Open.[224] Djokovic then played at the 2019 Indian Wells Masters and reached the third round where he was upset by Philipp Kohlschreiber in straight sets.[225] This was then followed by a three-set fourth round defeat to Roberto Bautista Agut in the 2019 Miami Open.[226] Djokovic then began his clay court season by playing in the 2019 Monte Carlo Masters, losing in the quarterfinals to Daniil Medvedev in three sets.[227]

During the Madrid Open, Novak Djokovic celebrated the 250 weeks at world number 1 in ATP rankings. He is one of only five players to achieve 250 weeks at No.1, after Roger Federer, Pete Sampras, Ivan Lendl and Jimmy Connors.[228] After beating ATP Next Generation player Stefanos Tsitsipas in Madrid Open final, Djokovic lifted the Madrid trophy for the third time and tied Nadal's record of 33 ATP Masters 1000 titles.[229] After heavy rain delays at the Italian Open, he made quick work of Denis Shapovalov and Philipp Kohlschreiber, followed by a 3-hour slug fest victory over long time rival Juan Martín del Potro.[230] He finished the tournament with a runner-up & being the only player to take a set off a rejuvenated Nadal.[231]

He competed in the French Open, reaching the semifinals without dropping a set and recording wins over Hubert Hurkacz, Henri Laaksonen, Salvatore Caruso, Jan-Lennard Struff, and fifth seed Alexander Zverev. His fourth round win over Struff made him the first man to reach 10 consecutive quarterfinals at Roland Garros. In the semifinals, he faced 2018 finalist Dominic Thiem, who defeated Djokovic in a four-hour, five-set match that was interrupted by rain multiple times and stretched across two days. This ended his 26-match winning streak in major tournaments and brought his search for a second Nole Slam to an end.[232]

At Wimbledon, he won his sixteenth Grand Slam, defending his title to win the tournament for a fifth time by defeating Roger Federer in an epic five set final that lasted four hours and fifty seven minutes, the longest in Wimbledon history. Djokovic saved two championship points in the fifth set en route to winning the title and the match also marked the first time a fifth set tiebreak was played in the men's singles of Wimbledon at 12 games all.[233][234] Djokovic then played at the 2019 Cincinnati Open as the defending champion and reached the semifinal where he lost to eventual champion Daniil Medvedev in three sets.[235] At the 2019 US Open, Djokovic was unable to defend his title, falling to Stan Wawrinka in the fourth round, while down two sets and a break before retiring due to injury. The defeat prevented Djokovic from winning three of the four Grand Slam events that year, a feat that he achieved in 2011 and 2015.[236] In October 2019, Djokovic defeated John Millman in straight sets to win the Japan Open.[237] At the Shanghai Masters, Djokovic reached the quarterfinal stage, but lost to Stefanos Tsitsipas in three sets.[238] In November 2019, Djokovic reached final of Paris Masters after defeating Grigor Dimitrov in straight sets.[239] In the final, Djokovic claimed his fifth title in Paris Masters after a two set win over Canadian young star Denis Shapovalov.[240] Djokovic then played in the Björn Borg group at the 2019 ATP Finals but was eliminated in the round robin stage after a straight-sets win over Matteo Berrettini, a three-set loss to Dominic Thiem and a straight sets defeat to Federer (his first loss to Federer since 2015).[241]

2020: ATP Cup & Australian Open titles, Multiple Masters Sets, US Open default

At the 2020 ATP Cup, Djokovic helped Serbia win its first title by scoring six victories including wins over Medvedev in the semifinal and Nadal in the final.[242] At the 2020 Australian Open, he defeated long time rival Roger Federer in straight sets en route to the final where he defeated three-time grand slam runner-up Dominic Thiem in five sets. This is Djokovic's 8th win at the Australian Open, making him the first Open Era male player to win Grand Slam titles in three different decades.[243] For his 17th Grand Slam win he received 2.5 Million Euro as prize money and also regained No.1 place in the ATP rankings.[244] Djokovic won the title at Dubai Tennis Championships fifth time, defeating Stefanos Tsitsipas in the final.[245][246] In June, Djokovic tested positive for COVID-19 during the Adria Tour, a series of charity exhibition games in Balkans, which he helped organize. Djokovic was criticized for holding the event with a lack of social distancing and other precautions taken against COVID-19, although they were organized in accordance with the measures issued by the governments.[247][248] The last match of the tour was cancelled after several players, their wives and coaches tested positive for the virus.[249] Djokovic said he was "deeply sorry", admitting he and organisers "were wrong" to go ahead with the event and that they believed the tournament met all health protocols.[250] He also said that many of the criticisms were malicious, adding: “It's obviously more than just criticism, it's like an agenda and a witch hunt”.[251][252]

Djokovic made history after defeating Milos Raonic in the final to win his second Cincinnati Masters title. By doing so, he won his 35th Masters 1000 title, equaling Rafael Nadal’s record of most ATP Masters 1000 titles and completing his second Career Golden Masters. By achieving this feat, Djokovic became the first person in tennis history to complete multiple masters sets.[253] In the fourth round of the US Open, Djokovic was defaulted after accidentally hitting a line official Laura Clark[254] in the throat during his match against Pablo Carreño Busta.[255] The United States Tennis Association docked Djokovic all ranking points he would have earned at the tournament and fined him the prize money that he would have won had the incident not occurred.[256]

Novak Djokovic Tennis career articles: 360