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Cork (city)

City in Munster, Ireland

Top 10 Cork (city) related articles

Cork

Corcaigh
City
From top, left to right: City Hall, the English Market, Quadrangle in UCC, the River Lee, Shandon Steeple
Coat of arms
Nicknames: 
The Rebel City, Leeside, The Real Capital
Motto(s): 
Statio Bene Fida Carinis  (Latin)
"A safe harbour for ships"[1][2]
Cork City
Cork
Cork City
Cork
Cork (Europe)
Coordinates: 51°53′50″N 8°28′12″W / 51.89722°N 8.47000°W / 51.89722; -8.47000Coordinates: 51°53′50″N 8°28′12″W / 51.89722°N 8.47000°W / 51.89722; -8.47000
StateIreland
ProvinceMunster
CountyCork
Founded6th century AD
City rights1185 AD
Government
 • TypeCork City Council
 • Lord MayorJoe Kavanagh
 • LEAs5
 • Dáil Éireann
 • European ParliamentSouth
Area
 • City187 km2 (72 sq mi)
 • Urban
174 km2 (67 sq mi)
 • Metro
820 km2 (320 sq mi)
Population
 • Estimate 
(2019)
210,000[3]
 • Density1,123/km2 (2,910/sq mi)
 • Urban
208,669[5]
 • Metro
305,222[4]
 • Demonym
Corkonian or Leesider
Time zoneUTC0 (WET)
 • Summer (DST)UTC+1 (IST)
Eircode
T12, T21 and T23
Area code(s)021
Vehicle index
mark code
C
Websitewww.corkcity.ie

Cork (/kɔːrk/; Irish: Corcaigh, pronounced [ˈkoɾkɪɟ], from corcach, meaning "marsh")[6] is the second largest city in Ireland, located in the south-west of Ireland, in the province of Munster. Following an extension to the city's boundary in 2019, its population is c. 210,000.[3]

The city centre is an island positioned between two channels of the River Lee which meet downstream at the eastern end of the city centre, where the quays and docks along the river lead outwards towards Lough Mahon and Cork Harbour, one of the largest natural harbours in the world.[7][8]

Originally a monastic settlement, Cork was expanded by Viking invaders around 915. Its charter was granted by Prince John in 1185. Cork city was once fully walled, and the remnants of the old medieval town centre can be found around South and North Main streets. The third largest city by population on the island of Ireland, the city's cognomen of "the rebel city" originates in its support for the Yorkist cause in the Wars of the Roses.[9] Corkonians sometimes refer to the city as "the real capital",[10] a reference to its opposition to the Anglo-Irish Treaty in the Irish Civil War.[11]

Cork (city) Intro articles: 10

History

Cork was originally a monastic settlement, reputedly founded by Saint Finbarr in the 6th century.[12] Cork became (more) urbanised some point between 915 and 922 when Norseman (Viking) settlers founded a trading port.[13] It has been proposed that, like Dublin, Cork was an important trading centre in the global Scandinavian trade network.[14] The ecclesiastical settlement continued alongside the Viking longphort, with the two developing a type of symbiotic relationship; the Norsemen providing otherwise unobtainable trade goods for the monastery, and perhaps also military aid.[15]

Map of 16th-century Cork
Patrick Street c.1890–1900

The city's charter was granted by Prince John, as Lord of Ireland, in 1185.[16] The city was once fully walled, and some wall sections and gates remain today.[17] For much of the Middle Ages, Cork city was an outpost of Old English culture in the midst of a predominantly hostile Gaelic countryside and cut off from the English government in the Pale around Dublin. Neighbouring Gaelic and Hiberno-Norman lords extorted "Black Rent" from the citizens to keep them from attacking the city. The present extent of the city has exceeded the medieval boundaries of the Barony of Cork City; it now takes in much of the neighbouring Barony of Cork. Together, these baronies are located between the Barony of Barrymore to the east, Muskerry East to the west and Kerrycurrihy to the south.

Workers clearing rubble on St Patrick's street following the Burning of Cork.

The city's municipal government was dominated by about 12–15 merchant families, whose wealth came from overseas trade with continental Europe – in particular the export of wool and hides and the import of salt, iron and wine.

The medieval population of Cork was about 2,100 people. It suffered a severe blow in 1349 when almost half the townspeople died of plague when the Black Death arrived in the town. In 1491, Cork played a part in the English Wars of the Roses when Perkin Warbeck, a pretender to the English throne, landed in the city and tried to recruit support for a plot to overthrow Henry VII of England. The then mayor of Cork and several important citizens went with Warbeck to England but when the rebellion collapsed they were all captured and executed.

The title of Mayor of Cork was established by royal charter in 1318, and the title was changed to Lord Mayor in 1900 following the knighthood of the incumbent mayor by Queen Victoria on her visit to the city.[18]

Since the nineteenth century, Cork had been a strongly Irish nationalist city, with widespread support for Irish Home Rule and the Irish Parliamentary Party, but from 1910 stood firmly behind William O'Brien's dissident All-for-Ireland Party. O'Brien published a third local newspaper, the Cork Free Press. Cork was overtaken by Belfast as Ireland's second largest city in the nineteenth-century.

In the War of Independence, the centre of Cork was burnt down by the British Black and Tans,[19] in an event known as the "Burning of Cork"[19] and saw fierce fighting between Irish guerrillas and UK forces. During the Irish Civil War, Cork was for a time held by anti-Treaty forces, until it was retaken by the pro-Treaty National Army in an attack from the sea.

Cork (city) History articles: 33

Climate

The climate of Cork, like the majority of Ireland, is mild oceanic (Cfb in the Köppen climate classification) and changeable with abundant rainfall and a lack of temperature extremes. Cork lies in plant Hardiness zone 9b. Met Éireann maintains a climatological weather station at Cork Airport,[20] a few kilometres south of the city centre. The airport is at an altitude of 151 metres (495 ft) and temperatures can often differ by a few degrees between the airport and the rest of the city. There are also smaller synoptic weather stations at UCC and Clover Hill.[20] Due to its position on the coast, Cork city is subject to occasional flooding.[21]

Temperatures below 0 °C (32 °F) or above 25 °C (77 °F) are rare. Cork Airport records an average of 1,227.9 millimetres (48.34 in) of precipitation annually, most of which is rain.[22] The airport records an average of 7 days of hail and 11 days of snow or sleet a year; though it only records lying snow for 2 days of the year. The low altitude of the city, and moderating influences of the harbour, mean that lying snow very rarely occurs in the city itself. There are on average 204 "rainy" days a year (over 0.2 millimetres (0.0079 in) of rainfall), of which there are 73 days with "heavy rain" (over 5 millimetres (0.20 in)).[22] Cork is also a generally foggy city, with an average of 97 days of fog a year, most common during mornings and during winter. Despite this, however, Cork is also one of Ireland's sunniest cities, with an average of 3.9 hours of sunshine every day and only having 67 days where there is no "recordable sunshine", mostly during and around winter.[22]

Climate data for Cork (ORK), 1981–2010 normals, extremes 1961–present
Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year
Record high °C (°F) 16.1
(61.0)
14.0
(57.2)
15.7
(60.3)
21.2
(70.2)
23.6
(74.5)
27.5
(81.5)
28.7
(83.7)
28.0
(82.4)
24.7
(76.5)
21.4
(70.5)
16.2
(61.2)
13.8
(56.8)
28.7
(83.7)
Average high °C (°F) 8.2
(46.8)
8.3
(46.9)
9.9
(49.8)
11.8
(53.2)
14.4
(57.9)
17.0
(62.6)
18.7
(65.7)
18.5
(65.3)
16.5
(61.7)
13.2
(55.8)
10.3
(50.5)
8.5
(47.3)
12.9
(55.2)
Daily mean °C (°F) 5.6
(42.1)
5.7
(42.3)
6.9
(44.4)
8.4
(47.1)
10.9
(51.6)
13.5
(56.3)
15.3
(59.5)
15.2
(59.4)
13.3
(55.9)
10.5
(50.9)
7.8
(46.0)
6.1
(43.0)
9.9
(49.8)
Average low °C (°F) 3.0
(37.4)
3.1
(37.6)
4.0
(39.2)
4.9
(40.8)
7.4
(45.3)
10.0
(50.0)
11.8
(53.2)
11.8
(53.2)
10.2
(50.4)
7.7
(45.9)
5.2
(41.4)
3.7
(38.7)
6.9
(44.4)
Record low °C (°F) −8.5
(16.7)
−8.6
(16.5)
−6.1
(21.0)
−2.4
(27.7)
−0.9
(30.4)
2.4
(36.3)
4.8
(40.6)
4.9
(40.8)
2.3
(36.1)
−0.9
(30.4)
−3.3
(26.1)
−7.2
(19.0)
−8.6
(16.5)
Average precipitation mm (inches) 131.4
(5.17)
97.8
(3.85)
97.6
(3.84)
76.5
(3.01)
82.3
(3.24)
80.9
(3.19)
78.8
(3.10)
96.8
(3.81)
94.6
(3.72)
138.2
(5.44)
120.0
(4.72)
133.1
(5.24)
1,227.9
(48.34)
Average precipitation days (≥ 1.0 mm) 16 13 14 11 12 10 10 11 11 15 14 15 152
Average snowy days 3.1 3.1 2.0 0.7 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.3 2.2 11.3
Average relative humidity (%) (at 15:00 UTC) 83.7 78.9 75.5 71.3 70.9 71.5 72.9 72.8 75.4 80.4 83.4 85.4 76.8
Mean monthly sunshine hours 55.8 67.8 102.3 159.0 192.2 174.0 167.4 161.2 129.0 93.0 69.0 57.2 1,427.9
Mean daily sunshine hours 1.8 2.4 3.3 5.3 6.2 5.8 5.4 5.2 4.3 3.0 2.3 1.7 3.9
Source: Met Éireann[23][24][25]

Cork (city) Climate articles: 11

Culture

The Cork School of Music and the Crawford College of Art and Design provide a throughput of new blood, as do the active theatre components of several courses at University College Cork (UCC). Important elements in the cultural life of the city are: Corcadorca Theatre Company, of which Cillian Murphy was a troupe member[26] prior to Hollywood fame; the Institute for Choreography and Dance, a national contemporary dance resource;[27] the Triskel Arts Centre (capacity c.90), which includes the Triskel Christchurch independent cinema; dance venue the Firkin Crane (capacity c.240); the Cork Academy of Dramatic Art (CADA) and Graffiti Theatre Company;[28] and the Cork Jazz Festival, Cork Film Festival[29] and Live at the Marquee events. The Everyman Palace Theatre (capacity c.650) and the Granary Theatre (capacity c.150) both host plays throughout the year.

Cork is home to the RTÉ Vanbrugh Quartet, and popular rock musicians and bands including John Spillane, Rory Gallagher, Five Go Down to the Sea?, Microdisney, The Frank and Walters, Sultans of Ping, Simple Kid, Fred and Mick Flannery. The opera singers Cara O'Sullivan, Mary Hegarty, Brendan Collins, and Sam McElroy are also Cork born.

Ranging in capacity from 50 to 1,000, the main music venues in the city are the Cork Opera House (capacity c.1000), The Everyman, Cyprus Avenue, Dali, Triskel Christchurch, The Roundy, and Coughlan's.[30]

The city's literary community centres on the Munster Literature Centre and the Triskel Arts Centre.[31] The short story writers Frank O'Connor and Seán Ó Faoláin hailed from Cork, and contemporary writers include Thomas McCarthy, Gerry Murphy, and novelist and poet William Wall.

Additions to the arts infrastructure include modern additions to the Crawford Municipal Art Gallery and renovations to the Cork Opera House in the early 21st century.[32] The Lewis Glucksman Gallery opened in the Autumn of 2004 at UCC, was nominated for the Stirling Prize in the United Kingdom, and the building of a new €60 million School of Music was completed in September 2007.

Cork was the European Capital of Culture for 2005, and in 2009 was included in the Lonely Planet's top 10 "Best in Travel 2010". The guide described Cork as being "at the top of its game: sophisticated, vibrant and diverse".[33]

There is a rivalry between Cork and Dublin, similar to the rivalry between Manchester and London, Melbourne and Sydney or Barcelona and Madrid. Some Corkonians view themselves as different from the rest of Ireland, and refer to themselves as "The Rebels"; the county is known as the Rebel County. This view sometimes manifests itself in humorous references to the Real Capital and the sale of T-shirts with light-hearted banners celebrating The People's Republic of Cork.[34]

Food

The city has many local traditions in food, including crubeens, tripe and drisheen, which were historically served in eating houses like that run by Katty Barry in the mid-20th century.[35] The English Market sells locally produced foods, including fresh fish, meats, fruit and vegetables, eggs and artisan cheeses and breads. During certain city festivals, food stalls are also sometimes erected on city streets such as St. Patrick's Street or Grand Parade.[36]

Accent

The Cork accent, part of the Southwest dialect of Hiberno-English, displays various features which set it apart from other accents in Ireland. Patterns of tone and intonation often rise and fall, with the overall tone tending to be more high-pitched than other Irish accents. English spoken in Cork has a number of dialect words that are peculiar to the city and environs. Like standard Hiberno-English, some of these words originate from the Irish language, but others through other languages Cork's inhabitants encountered at home and abroad.[37] The Cork accent displays varying degrees of rhoticity, usually indicative of the speaker's local community.

Cork (city) Culture articles: 47

Media

Broadcasting

RTÉ's Cork studios

Broadcasting companies based in Cork include RTÉ Cork, which has a radio, television and production unit on Father Matthew Street in the city centre. Communicorp Media opened a radio studio in 2019 in the city covering content on both Today FM and Newstalk.[38] Virgin Media Television also has an office in the city which covers local news stories developing within the city and county.

The city's FM radio band features RTÉ Radio 1, RTÉ 2fm, RTÉ lyric fm, RTÉ Raidió na Gaeltachta, Today FM, Classic Hits, Newstalk and the religious station Spirit Radio. There are also local stations such as Cork's 96FM, Cork's Red FM, C103, CUH 102.0FM, UCC 98.3FM (formerly Cork Campus Radio 97.4fm)[39] and Christian radio station Life 93.1FM.[40] Cork also has a temporary licensed citywide community station 'Cork FM Community Radio' on 100.5FM, which is on-air on Saturdays and Sundays only. Cork has also been home to pirate radio stations, including South Coast Radio and ERI in the 1980s. Today some small pirates stations remain.

Print

Cork is home to one of Ireland's main national newspapers, the Irish Examiner (formerly the Cork Examiner). Its 'sister paper', The Echo (formerly the Evening Echo), was for decades connected to the "Echo boys", who were poor and often homeless children who sold the newspaper. Today, the shouts of the vendors selling the Echo can still be heard in parts of the city centre. One of the biggest free newspapers in the city is the Cork Independent.[41] The city's university publishes the UCC Express and Motley magazine.[42][43]

Cork (city) Media articles: 18

Places of interest

St. Anne's Shandon

Cork features architecturally notable buildings originating from the Medieval to Modern periods.[44] The only notable remnant of the Medieval era is the Red Abbey. There are two cathedrals in the city; St. Mary's Cathedral and Saint Fin Barre's Cathedral. St Mary's Cathedral, often referred to as the North Cathedral, is the Catholic cathedral of the city and was begun in 1808. Its distinctive tower was added in the 1860s. St Fin Barre's Cathedral serves the Church of Ireland (Anglican) and is possibly the more famous of the two. It is built on the foundations of an earlier cathedral. Work began in 1862 and ended in 1879 under the direction of architect William Burges.

St. Patrick's Street, the main street of the city which was remodelled in the mid-2000s, is known for the architecture of the buildings along its pedestrian-friendly route and is the main shopping thoroughfare. At its northern end is a landmark statue of Father Mathew. The reason for its curved shape is that it was originally a channel of the River Lee which was built over on arches.[45] The General Post Office, with its limestone façade, is on Oliver Plunkett Street, on the site of the Theatre Royal which was built in 1760 and burned down in 1840. The English circus proprietor Pablo Fanque rebuilt an amphitheatre on the spot in 1850, which was subsequently transformed into a theatre and then into the present General Post Office in 1877.[46][47] The Grand Parade is a tree-lined avenue, home to offices, shops and financial institutions. The old financial centre is the South Mall, with several banks whose interior derive from the 19th century, such as the Allied Irish Bank's which was once an exchange.

Many of the city's buildings are in the Georgian style, although there are a number of examples of modern landmark structures, such as County Hall tower, which was, at one time the tallest building in Ireland[48] until being superseded by another Cork City building: The Elysian. Outside the County Hall is the landmark sculpture of two men, known locally as 'Cha and Miah'. Across the river from County Hall is Ireland's longest building;[49] built in Victorian times, Our Lady's Psychiatric Hospital has now been partially renovated and converted into a residential housing complex called Atkins Hall, after its architect William Atkins.[50]

Cork's most famous building is the church tower of Shandon, which dominates the North side of the city. It is widely regarded as the symbol of the city. The North and East sides are faced in red sandstone, and the West and South sides are clad in the predominant stone of the region, white limestone. At the top sits a weather vane in the form of an eleven-foot salmon.[51] Another site in Shandon is Skiddy's Almshouse, which was built in the 18th century to provide a home to the poorest of the city.

Cork City Hall, another notable building of limestone, replaced the previous one which was destroyed by the Black and Tans during the War of Independence in an event known as the "Burning of Cork".[19] The cost of this new building was provided by the UK Government in the 1930s as a gesture of reconciliation.[52]

Other notable places include Elizabeth Fort, the Cork Opera House, Christ Church on South Main Street (now the Triskel Arts Centre and original site of early Hiberno-Norse church), and St Mary's Dominican Church on Popes Quay. Other popular tourist attractions include the grounds of University College Cork, through which the River Lee flows, the Women's Gaol at Sunday's Well (now a heritage centre) and the English Market. This covered market traces its origins back to 1610, and the present building dates from 1786.[53]

Parks and amenity spaces include Fitzgerald's Park to the west of the city (which contains the Cork Public Museum), the angling lake known as The Lough, Bishop Lucey Park (which is centrally located and contains a portion of the old city wall) and the Marina and Atlantic Pond (an avenue and amenity near Blackrock used by joggers, runners and rowing clubs).[54][55][56][57]

Up until April 2009, there were also two large commercial breweries in the city. The Beamish and Crawford on South Main Street closed in April 2009 and transferred production to the Murphy's brewery in Lady's Well. This brewery also produces Heineken for the Irish market. There is also the Franciscan Well brewery, which started as an independent brewery in 1998 but has since been acquired by Coors.

Cork (city) Places of interest articles: 36

Local government and politics

Cork City Hall

With a population of approximately 210,000,[3] Cork is the second-most populous city in the State and the 16th-most populous area of local government.[65] Per the Local Government Act 2001, Cork City Council is a tier-1 entity of local government with the same status in law as a county council.

While local government in Ireland has limited powers in comparison with other countries, the council has responsibility for planning, roads, sanitation, libraries, street lighting, parks, and a number of other important functions. Cork City Council has 31 elected members representing six electoral areas. As of the 2019 Cork City Council election, the council's members are affiliated to the following political parties: Fianna Fáil (8 members), Fine Gael (7 members), Green Party (4 members), Sinn Féin (4 members), Labour (1 member), Solidarity–People Before Profit (1 member), Workers' Party (1 member), Independents (5 members).[66] Certain councillors are co-opted to represent the city at the South-West Regional Authority. A new Lord Mayor of Cork is chosen in a vote by the elected members of the council under a D'Hondt system count.[67][68] Since June 2020, the mayor has been Joe Kavanagh of Fine Gael.[69]

Cork City Hall is located along Albert Quay on the south side of the city. It officially opened on 8 September 1936, following the previous building being destroyed in the "Burning of Cork" in 1920. The administrative offices for Cork County Council are also located within the city limits, on the Carrigrohane Road on the west side of the city.[70]

For the purposes of elections to Dáil Éireann, the city is part of two constituencies: Cork North-Central and Cork South-Central which each returns four TDs. Following the 2016 general election, these constituencies together returned two TDs for the Fine Gael party, three for Fianna Fáil, two for Sinn Féin and one for the Anti-Austerity Alliance-People Before Profit.

In 2018, cabinet approval was given for an extension of the Cork City Council boundary, to include Cork Airport, Douglas, Ballincollig and other surrounding areas.[71][72] This extension was completed in mid-2019.[3]

Cork (city) Local government and politics articles: 23

Economy

Retail

The retail trade in Cork city includes a mix of modern shopping centres and family owned local shops. Shopping centres can be found in several of Cork's suburbs, including Blackpool, Ballincollig, Douglas, Ballyvolane, Wilton and at Mahon Point Shopping Centre.

Patrick's Street, Cork's main shopping street

Other shopping arcades are in the city centre, including the "Cornmarket Centre" on Cornmarket Street, "Merchant's Quay Shopping Centre" on Merchant's Quay, home to Debenhams, Dunnes Stores and Marks & Spencer, and a retail street called Opera Lane off St. Patrick's Street/Academy Street. A mixed retail and office development, on the site of the former Capitol Cineplex, with approximately 60,000 square feet (5,600 m2) of retail space, was opened in June 2017.[73][74] Retail tenants in this development include Facebook, AlienVault and Huawei.[75][76]

Cork's main shopping street is St. Patrick's Street and is the most expensive street in the country per sq. metre after Dublin's Grafton Street. The area was impacted by the post-2008 downturn, though retail growth has increased since, with Penneys announcing expansion plans in 2015,[77] redesigning of some facades on the street,[78] and opening of newer outlets, including Superdry in 2015.[79] Other shopping areas in the city centre include Oliver Plunkett St. and Grand Parade. Cork is home to some of the country's leading department stores with the foundations of shops such as Dunnes Stores and the former Roches Stores being laid in the city.

Industry

Murphys Stout, 1919 advert for the Cork brewery

Cork City is a hub of industry in the region.[80] Several pharmaceutical companies have invested heavily in the area, including Pfizer Inc., Johnson & Johnson and Swiss company Novartis.[81] Perhaps the most famous product of the Cork pharmaceutical industry is Viagra. Cork is also the European headquarters of Apple Inc. where over 3,000 staff are involved in manufacturing, R&D and customer support.[82] Logitech and EMC Corporation are also important IT employers in the area.[83][84] Three hospitals are also among the top ten employers in the city.[85]

The city is also home to the Heineken Brewery that brews Murphy's Irish Stout and the nearby Beamish and Crawford brewery (taken over by Heineken in 2008) which have been in the city for generations. 45% of the world's Tic Tac sweets are manufactured at the city's Ferrero factory.[86] For many years, Cork was the home to Ford Motor Company, which manufactured cars in the docklands area before the plant was closed in 1984. Henry Ford's grandfather was from West Cork, which was one of the main reasons for opening up the manufacturing facility in Cork.[87] Technology has since replaced the older manufacturing businesses of the 1970s and 1980s, with people now working at a number of IT companies across the city area – such as Amazon.com, the online retailer, which has offices at Cork Airport Business Park.[88]

Cork's deep harbour allows large ships to enter, bringing trade and easy import/export of products. Cork Airport also allows easy access to continental Europe and Cork Kent railway station in the city centre provides good rail links for domestic trade.

Employment

According to the 2011 Cork City Employment & Land Use Survey, the single largest employers in the city (all with over 1,000 employees) include Cork University Hospital, Apple Inc, University College Cork, Boston Scientific, Cork City Council, Cork Institute of Technology, Bon Secours Hospital, Cork, retailers Supervalu and Centra, the Irish Defence Forces at Collins Barracks, and the Mercy University Hospital.[85]

Cork (city) Economy articles: 41