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Clackamas County, Oregon

County in Oregon, United States

Clackamas County
Seal
Location within the U.S. state of Oregon
Oregon's location within the U.S.
Coordinates: 45°11′N 122°13′W / 45.19°N 122.21°W / 45.19; -122.21
Country  United States
State  Oregon
FoundedJuly 5, 1843
SeatOregon City
Largest cityLake Oswego
Area
 • Total1,883 sq mi (4,880 km2)
 • Land1,870 sq mi (4,800 km2)
 • Water13 sq mi (30 km2)  0.7%%
Population
 (2010)
 • Total375,992
 • Estimate 
(2019)
418,187
 • Density223/sq mi (86/km2)
Time zoneUTC−8 (Pacific)
 • Summer (DST)UTC−7 (PDT)
Congressional districts3rd, 5th
Websitewww.clackamas.us

Clackamas County /ˈklækəməs/ is one of the 36 counties in the U.S. state of Oregon. As of the 2010 United States Census, the population was 375,992,[1] making it Oregon's third-most populous county. Its county seat is Oregon City.[2] The county was named after the Native Americans living in the area, the Clackamas Indians, who are part of the Chinookan people.

Clackamas County is part of the Portland-Vancouver-Hillsboro, OR-WA Metropolitan Statistical Area. It is in the Willamette Valley.

History

Originally named Clackamas District, it was one of the four original Oregon districts created by Oregon's Provisional Legislature on July 5, 1843 along with Twality (later Washington), Champooick (later Marion), and Yamhill. The four districts were redesignated as counties in 1845. At the time of its creation, Clackamas County covered portions of four present-day U.S. states and a Canadian province. The Columbia River became the northern boundary of the county in 1844. Soon after John McLoughlin staked a land claim in Oregon City and built a house that in 2003 became a unit of the Fort Vancouver National Historic Site.

Most of the indigenous people of the Wil-lamet Valley were forcibly removed in February of 1859, to the reservation of the Confederated Tribes of Grand Ronde. Most were moved without treaty or compensation for lost lands or resources. Some 22 tribes were moved during the cold winter. It is estimated that some 30% would not survive the first year. The tribes eventually prospered, but outside of Clackamas County. They never received any revenue or compensation from the logging of their homeland forests.

In addition the Tribes of the Cascades Mountains were isolated to a Reservation after the signing of a treaty in 1859. Confederated Tribes of Warmsprings was established and remains a strong and vital player in actions that concern the Federal forests of the Cascades Range.

Oregon City was also the site of the only federal court west of the Rockies in 1849, when San Francisco, California, was platted. The plat was filed in 1850 in the first plat book of the first office of records in the West Coast and is still in Oregon City.

In 1902, the Willamette Meteorite was recovered from a field near present-day West Linn.

In contrast with the more liberal and cosmopolitan Multnomah County to the north, and the more corporate Washington County to the west, some citizens of Clackamas county have espoused a blue-collar, yet conservative political outlook of the backlash mold described by Thomas Frank. It is the headquarters of Lon Mabon, whose Oregon Citizens Alliance has worked to pass a number of anti-homosexual initiatives, and where Bill Sizemore, who championed various anti-government initiatives in the 1990s, had his base before he moved to Klamath Falls. However, it is a very mixed area overall, narrowly voting for Republican George W. Bush over Democrat John Kerry in 2004, but voting for Democrat Barack Obama over Republican John McCain in 2008.

Clackamas is the first county in Oregon to have four models of governance for its communities. Like the rest of Oregon, it has cities (which are formally incorporated) and rural communities (some of which for federal purposes are considered census-designated places).

After completion of a process that began late in 1999, the county adopted an ordinance on August 11, 2005 which defined hamlets and villages. By the November 30, 2005 deadline, three communities had submitted petitions to be so designated. Boring petitioned to become a village, but the application was rejected in a town hall referendum in August 2006. The communities along US 26 near Mount Hood from Brightwood to Rhododendron petitioned to become "The Villages at Mount Hood", and it was approved by residents in May 2006. Beavercreek petitioned to become a hamlet, and was recognized as such in September 2006.

Geography

Forest west of Clackamas River Valley

According to the United States Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 1,883 square miles (4,880 km2), of which 1,870 square miles (4,800 km2) is land and 12 square miles (31 km2) (0.7%) is water.[3]

The county includes parts of two national forests: Mount Hood National Forest and Willamette National Forest.

Major highways

Adjacent counties

Demographics

Historical population
Census Pop.
18501,859
18603,46686.4%
18705,99372.9%
18809,26054.5%
189015,23364.5%
190019,65829.0%
191029,93152.3%
192037,69825.9%
193046,20522.6%
194057,13023.6%
195086,71651.8%
1960113,03830.4%
1970166,08846.9%
1980241,91945.7%
1990278,85015.3%
2000338,39121.4%
2010375,99211.1%
2019 (est.)418,187[4]11.2%
US Decennial Census[5]
1790-1960[6] 1900-1990[7]
1990-2000[8] 2010-2019[1]

2000 census

As of the 2000 United States Census[9] there were 338,391 people, 128,201 households, and 91,663 families in the county. The population density was 181/sqmi (70/km2). There were 136,954 housing units at an average density of 73/sqmi (28/km2). The racial makeup of the county was 91.27% White, 2.45% Asian, 0.71% Native American, 0.66% Black or African American, 0.17% Pacific Islander, 2.28% from other races, and 2.46% from two or more races. 4.95% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race. 20.7% were of German, 11.6% English, 9.1% Irish and 7.5% American ancestry.

There were 128,201 households, out of which 34.20% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 58.60% were married couples living together, 9.00% had a female householder with no husband present, and 28.50% were non-families. 22.00% of all households were made up of individuals, and 7.80% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.62 and the average family size was 3.07.

The county population contained 26.20% under the age of 18, 8.00% from 18 to 24, 28.70% from 25 to 44, 26.00% from 45 to 64, and 11.10% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 38 years. For every 100 females, there were 97.50 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 94.90 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $52,080, and the median income for a family was $60,791. Males had a median income of $43,462 versus $30,891 for females. The per capita income for the county was $25,973. About 4.60% of families and 6.60% of the population were below the poverty line, including 7.60% of those under age 18 and 5.10% of those age 65 or over.

2010 census

As of the 2010 United States Census, there were 375,992 people, 145,790 households, and 100,866 families in the county.[10] The population density was 201.0 inhabitants per square mile (77.6/km2). There were 156,945 housing units at an average density of 83.9 per square mile (32.4/km2).[11] The racial makeup of the county was 88.2% white, 3.7% Asian, 0.8% American Indian, 0.8% black or African American, 0.2% Pacific islander, 3.1% from other races, and 3.2% from two or more races. Those of Hispanic or Latino origin made up 7.7% of the population.[10] In terms of ancestry, 24.9% were German, 14.5% were English, 13.3% were Irish, 5.0% were Norwegian, and 4.9% were American.[12]

Of the 145,790 households, 32.8% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 54.8% were married couples living together, 9.8% had a female householder with no husband present, 30.8% were non-families, and 24.1% of all households were made up of individuals. The average household size was 2.56 and the average family size was 3.04. The median age was 40.6 years.[10]

The median income for a household in the county was $62,007 and the median income for a family was $74,905. Males had a median income of $53,488 versus $39,796 for females. The per capita income for the county was $31,785. About 6.1% of families and 9.0% of the population were below the poverty line, including 11.2% of those under age 18 and 6.2% of those age 65 or over.[13]

Communities

Mount Hood reflected in Trillium Lake
Clackamas River flowing through Milo McIver State Park

Several of the county's cities extend into other counties. Lake Oswego and Milwaukie include areas in Multnomah County. Lake Oswego, Rivergrove and Wilsonville include areas in Washington County. The cities of Portland and Tualatin extend into Clackamas County from Multnomah and Washington counties respectively.

In Clackamas County, hamlets and villages are models of local land use governance for unincorporated areas. The four hamlets in Clackamas County are Beavercreek, Molalla Prairie, Mulino, and Stafford. The county's only village is the Villages at Mount Hood.

Cities

Census-designated places

Hamlet

Unincorporated communities

Law and government

Clackamas County has usually voted for the eventual winner of presidential elections, with exceptions in 1884, 1892, 1916, 1948, 1960, 1976 and 2016.

Presidential election results
Presidential election results[14]
Year Republican Democratic Third parties
2020 42.8% 110,509 53.9% 139,043 3.1% 8,127
2016 41.3% 88,392 47.7% 102,095 11.0% 23,552
2012 46.8% 88,592 50.4% 95,493 2.8% 5,247
2008 43.6% 83,595 53.9% 103,476 2.5% 4,807
2004 50.1% 97,691 48.8% 95,129 1.1% 2,180
2000 47.8% 77,539 47.1% 76,421 5.1% 8,302
1996 41.0% 59,443 46.7% 67,709 12.4% 17,994
1992 34.8% 53,724 39.0% 60,310 26.2% 40,504
1988 49.8% 61,381 48.5% 59,799 1.8% 2,171
1984 59.1% 68,630 40.7% 47,254 0.3% 289
1980 49.4% 54,111 37.0% 40,462 13.6% 14,910
1976 50.7% 47,671 45.2% 42,504 4.0% 3,784
1972 53.5% 41,767 41.7% 32,540 4.8% 3,782
1968 50.6% 32,363 43.7% 27,939 5.7% 3,659
1964 37.3% 21,299 62.6% 35,711 0.1% 33
1960 54.5% 28,531 45.3% 23,679 0.2% 109
1956 55.4% 25,314 44.6% 20,416
1952 59.5% 24,174 39.9% 16,219 0.6% 227
1948 48.0% 14,431 47.4% 14,263 4.6% 1,389
1944 46.3% 12,492 52.1% 14,060 1.6% 435
1940 45.4% 11,416 53.9% 13,547 0.8% 190
1936 27.4% 5,830 66.7% 14,203 6.0% 1,270
1932 32.1% 5,964 62.2% 11,575 5.7% 1,069
1928 59.5% 9,216 38.2% 5,918 2.3% 352
1924 43.3% 5,864 22.9% 3,099 33.8% 4,585
1920 59.5% 6,928 32.1% 3,740 8.3% 971
1916 50.9% 6,349 42.8% 5,334 6.3% 788
1912 23.0% 1,503 33.2% 2,171 43.8% 2,858
1908 53.9% 2,776 36.2% 1,866 9.9% 507
1904 67.8% 2,783 16.7% 684 15.6% 639
1900 53.9% 2,234 39.6% 1,641 6.4% 265
1896 51.7% 2,664 46.3% 2,386 1.8% 94
1892 44.5% 1,815 16.0% 655 39.4% 1,608
1888 56.3% 1,527 37.1% 1,005 6.5% 176
1884 55.3% 1,381 40.6% 1,015 4.0% 101
1880 57.1% 1,166 42.7% 872 0.2% 4
County Chair: Tootie Smith
County Commissioners: Paul Savas

Martha Schrader

Mark Shull

Sonya Fisher

County Clerk: Sherry Hall
Assessor Tax Collector: Tami Little
Treasurer: Brian Nava
Justice of the Peace: Karen Brisbin
District Attorney: John Wentworth
County Sheriff: Angela Brandenburg
Federal government
U.S. Representative(s): Earl Blumenauer (D-1st District)

Kurt Schrader (D-5th District)

U.S. Senators: Ron Wyden (D),

Jeff Merkley (D)

[15]

State Representatives

District Name[15] Party Residence Notes
  District 18 Rick Lewis Republican Silverton
  District 26 Courtney Neron Democratic Wilsonville
  District 35 Dacia Grayber Democratic Tigard
  District 37 Rachel Prusak Democratic West Linn
  District 38 Andrea Salinas Democratic Lake Oswego
  District 39 Christine Drazan Republican Canby House Minority Leader
  District 40 Mark Meek Democratic Gladstone
  District 41 Karin Power Democratic Milwaukie
  District 48 Jeff Reardon Democratic Happy Valley
  District 51 Janelle Bynum Democratic Happy Valley
  District 52 Anna Williams Democratic Hood River
  District 59 Daniel Bonham Republican The Dalles

State Senators

District Name[15] Party Residence Notes
  District 9 Fred Girod Republican Stayton Senate Minority Leader
  District 13 Kim Thatcher Republican Keizer
  District 18 Ginny Burdick Democratic Portland
  District 19 Rob Wagner Democratic Lake Oswego Senate Majority Leader
  District 20 Bill Kennemer Republican Canby
  District 21 Kathleen Taylor Democratic Portland
  District 24 Kayse Jama Democratic Portland
  District 26 Chuck Thomsen Republican Hood River
  District 30 Lynn Findley Republican Vale

Economy

Since the county's creation, agriculture, timber, manufacturing, and commerce have been the principal economic activities. Mount Hood, the only year-round ski resort in the United States and the site of Timberline Lodge, is a major attraction for recreation and tourism, offering outdoor recreation activities from skiing and rafting to fishing and camping.

Infrastructure

The county supports the Library Information Network of Clackamas County. The urban areas of the county are also served by Metro.

Notable people

See also

References

  1. ^ a b "State & County QuickFacts". US Census Bureau. Archived from the original on July 8, 2011. Retrieved November 14, 2013.
  2. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Archived from the original on May 31, 2011. Retrieved June 7, 2011.
  3. ^ "2010 Census Gazetteer Files". US Census Bureau. August 22, 2012. Retrieved February 25, 2015.
  4. ^ "Population and Housing Unit Estimates". Retrieved March 26, 2020.
  5. ^ "US Decennial Census". US Census Bureau. Retrieved February 25, 2015.
  6. ^ "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. Retrieved February 25, 2015.
  7. ^ Forstall, Richard L., ed. (March 27, 1995). "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". US Census Bureau. Retrieved February 25, 2015.
  8. ^ "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000" (PDF). US Census Bureau. April 2, 2001. Retrieved February 25, 2015.
  9. ^ "U.S. Census website". US Census Bureau. Retrieved January 31, 2008.
  10. ^ a b c "Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 Demographic Profile Data". US Census Bureau. Archived from the original on February 13, 2020. Retrieved February 23, 2016.
  11. ^ "Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - County". US Census Bureau. Archived from the original on 13 February 2020. Retrieved 23 February 2016.
  12. ^ "Selected Social Characteristics in the US – 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates". US Census Bureau. Archived from the original on February 13, 2020. Retrieved February 23, 2016.
  13. ^ "Selected Economic Characteristics – 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates". US Census Bureau. Archived from the original on February 13, 2020. Retrieved February 23, 2016.
  14. ^ Leip, David. "Atlas of US Presidential Elections". uselectionatlas.org. Retrieved April 4, 2018.
  15. ^ a b c "Elected Officials: Clackamas County". Clackamas County, Oregon. Retrieved January 14, 2021.
  16. ^ "Mickey Mouse Club Cast: Bob Amsberry". Original Mickey Mouse Club. Retrieved April 9, 2016.
  17. ^ Spitaleri, Ellen (June 24, 2013). "OCHS graduate sisters compete for state pageant crown". Portland Tribune. Portland, OR: Pamplin Media Group. Archived from the original on July 1, 2013. Retrieved August 16, 2015.
  18. ^ Pulitzer-prize winning author has Eastern Oregon ties, East Oregonian, May 9, 2007.(subscription required)
  19. ^ Green, Aimee (August 16, 2015). "Woman who loved Harding finally vindicated". The Oregonian. Portland, Oregon. p. A2. Archived from the original on March 26, 2018.
  20. ^ "George Bruns". Moviefone. Archived from the original on November 5, 2020.
  21. ^ "Oregon State Baseball". Oregon State University. Archived from the original on June 1, 2010.
  22. ^ Mesh, Aaron (August 23, 2016). "Here's How Far Oregon Olympian Ryan Crouser Threw a Shot Put". Willamette Week. Archived from the original on January 2, 2019.
  23. ^ "Obituary: Alma Francis Fields". The Oregonian. Portland, Oregon. August 23, 1968. p. 1.
  24. ^ Simon, Mark. "Remembering the wackiest game ever". ESPN.com. Retrieved 1 October 2018.
  25. ^ Brennan, Christine (January 20, 1994). "Rival Skater's Ex-Husband Charged in Attack". The Washington Post. Archived from the original on January 2, 2018. Retrieved August 14, 2018.
  26. ^ Miller, Peter (November 1984). "Being Bill". Ski. 49: 52. ISSN 0037-6159.
  27. ^ "Ralph Oliver Patt: Canby, Oregon". Death-Record. Archived from the original on 21 January 2013. Retrieved 15 August 2012.
  28. ^ Griewank (2010, p. 1): Griewank, Andreas (1 January 2010), Tuning guitars and reading music in major thirds, Matheon preprints, 695, Rosestr. 3a, 12524 Berlin, Germany: DFG research center "MATHEON, Mathematics for key technologies" Berlin, MSC-Classification 97M80 Arts. Music. Language. ArchitectureCS1 maint: location (link) (Postscript file and PDF file)
  29. ^ Associated Press (7 August 1991). "DOE (Department of Energy) says report on accidents at Hanford to be released soon". Lewiston Morning Tribune. Yakima. Retrieved 17 August 2012.Geronios, Nicholas K. (7 August 1991). "DOE accused of concealing report: Document may detail 125 Hanford accidents". The Spokesman-Review (Spokane, WA). Retrieved 17 August 2012.
  30. ^ Dorn Steele, Karen (13 July 1997). "Cracks in Hanford's clean bill of health: Congressional watchdogs want to make sure nuclear facility plugs leaks". The Spokesman-Review (Spokane, WA). (subscription required). Archived from the original on 11 June 2014.
  31. ^ Baker, Jeff (April 30, 2014). "17 actors you (maybe) didn't know were from Oregon". The Oregonian. Portland, Oregon. Archived from the original on February 23, 2015.
  32. ^ Turnquist, Kristi (February 11, 2016). "TV's Maria Thayer: From a bee farm in Boring to the new sitcom, 'Those Who Can't'". The Oregonian. Retrieved September 25, 2016.
  33. ^ Cade, Michael (October 23, 2006). "Sibling rivalry? Nope". Portland Tribune. Pamplin Media Group. Archived from the original on December 30, 2014.

Further reading

External links