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Alan Chambers (activist)

Former leader of ex-gay organisation, Exodus International

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Alan Manning Chambers (born February 21, 1972)[1] is the former president of Exodus International[2] and co-founder of Speak. Love., headquartered in Orlando, Florida. Before coming to Exodus, Chambers served on the pastoral team at Calvary Assembly of God, one of the largest churches in Orlando.[3]

On June 19, 2013, Chambers repudiated the organization's mission in a nearly hour-long talk at the organization's 38th annual meeting.[4] He co-founded Speak. Love. with two other former Exodus leaders later that year.

Background

Chambers was actively involved in promoting policies that in his view preserve and protect traditional marriage and the family. He testified before the Massachusetts state judiciary committee on same-sex marriage.[5][6] He was also a member of the Arlington Group,[7] a coalition working to pass legislation against same-sex marriage.

Chambers says that he has mostly overcome his attraction to men (although he does speak openly about his own ongoing sexual attraction to men[8]); however, he rejects the term ex-gay.[9][10] He is married to Leslie Chambers and has two adopted children.[3][11] He travels extensively and is a frequent speaker and guest lecturer at conferences, churches and college campuses. He has debated at many university campuses, such as the University of California at Berkeley, Pepperdine University and Reformed Theological Seminary.

Prior to Exodus International's annual conference in 2012, Chambers stated, "I do not believe that cure is a word that is applicable to really any struggle, homosexuality included.... For someone to put out a shingle and say, "I can cure homosexuality" — that to me is as bizarre as someone saying they can cure any other common temptation or struggle that anyone faces on Planet Earth."[8] In July 2012, while appearing on NBC's Hardball, Chambers stated that he always believed the catchphrase "Pray away the gay" to be a lazy stereotype and one that he never used, as it invalidates the nature of the complex issue surrounding homosexuality. Chambers went on to tell host Michael Smerconish that he has same-sex attraction, and for anyone to say he does not have temptations, or that he could never be tempted, or does not have same-sex attraction is not true.[12][13] He has admitted to having experienced attraction to both sexes.[14]

In June 2013, he closed the organization with a public apology to the LGBT community, saying that "For quite some time we’ve been imprisoned in a worldview that’s neither honoring toward our fellow human beings, nor biblical." He remarked that he will now seek to create "safe, welcoming and mutually transforming communities.”[15]

In 2015, Chambers published a book entitled, My Exodus: Leaving the Slavery of Religion, Loving the Image of God in Everyone.[16]

Alan Chambers (activist) Background articles: 9

Accolades

In 2011, WORLD named Chambers as their "Daniel of the Year," for his stance on Christian issues.[17] Chambers was listed in Charisma magazine as one of the top Christian leaders who represent the future of the American church.[3]

Alan Chambers (activist) Accolades articles: 4

See also

References

  1. ^ "Last official day i my 30's. Tomorrow is the big 4-0!". Twitter. February 20, 2012. Archived from the original on April 14, 2016. Retrieved March 23, 2021.
  2. ^ "Board of Directors". Exodus International. Archived from the original on August 11, 2007. Retrieved March 23, 2021.
  3. ^ a b c "Biography of Alan Chambers". Exodus International. Archived from the original on September 28, 2007. Retrieved March 23, 2021.
  4. ^ Tenety, Elizabeth, "Exodus International, criticized for ‘reparative therapies’ for gay Christians, to shut down", Washington Post, June 20, 2013. Included link to video of Chambers' talk at Exodus' website Archived June 22, 2013, at the Wayback Machine. Retrieved 2013-06-20.
  5. ^ "Massachusetts Marriage Affirmation & Protection Amendment". February 12, 2004. Archived from the original on September 28, 2007. Retrieved March 23, 2021.
  6. ^ "Alan Chambers: President, Exodus International". NewsGuests.com. Archived from the original on 10 February 2013. Retrieved 20 June 2013.
  7. ^ "Participating Organizations". The Arlington Group. Archived from the original on January 12, 2013.
  8. ^ a b "Christian Group Backs Away from Ex-Gay Therapy". Family Equality. June 27, 2012. Retrieved March 23, 2021.
  9. ^ "Great Thread at ExGay Watch". March 4, 2008. Archived from the original on January 15, 2010. Retrieved March 23, 2021.
  10. ^ "Approaching Agreement in Debate over Homosexuality". June 18, 2007. Archived from the original on December 14, 2016. Retrieved March 23, 2021.
  11. ^ Chambers, Alan (2006). "God's Grace and the Homosexual Next Door". Harvest House. p. 36. Retrieved March 23, 2021.
  12. ^ "Alan Chambers Interviewed by MSNBC's "Hardball" | Exodus International". Archived from the original on 2012-07-24. Retrieved 2012-07-22.
  13. ^ "'Pray Away the Gay' Leader Changes Belief that Homosexuality can be 'Cured'". NBC News. July 9, 2012. Archived from the original on July 13, 2012. Retrieved March 23, 2021.
  14. ^ "The Man Behind the Historic Implosion of the Ex-Gay Movement". Archived from the original on 2016-09-13. Retrieved 2015-10-23.
  15. ^ "Christian Group Exodus International Apologizes to Gay Community, Shuts Down". The Kansas City Star. Archived from the original on January 1, 2014. Retrieved June 20, 2013.
  16. ^ Chambers, Alan (2015). "My Exodus: Leaving the Slavery of Religion, Loving the Image of God in Everyone". Retrieved March 23, 2021.
  17. ^ Dean, Jamie (December 17, 2011). "2011 Daniel of the Year". World Archives. Archived from the original on May 7, 2012. Retrieved March 23, 2021.

External links