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2021 United Kingdom local elections

Elections

Top 10 2021 United Kingdom local elections related articles

2021 United Kingdom local elections

← 2019 6 May 2021 2022 →

  • 21 county councils
  • 124 unitary, district and borough councils
  • 13 directly elected mayors
  • 39 police and crime commissioners
 
Leader Boris Johnson Keir Starmer
Party Conservative Labour
Leader since 23 July 2019 4 April 2020
Popular vote[n 1] 36% 29%
Swing[n 2] 8% 1%
Councils 63 44
Councils +/– 13 8
Councillors 2,345 1,345
Councillors +/– 235 327

 
Leader Ed Davey Jonathan Bartley
and Siân Berry
Party Liberal Democrats Green
Leader since 27 August 2020[n 3]
Popular vote[n 1] 17%
Swing[n 2] 2%
Councils 7 0
Councils +/– 1
Councillors 588 151
Councillors +/– 8 88

District, borough, and unitary councils

County councils

Mayors

Police and crime commissioners
Postal voting pack used in the 2021 local elections: white for local councillors, yellow for mayoral elections and green for police and crime commissioner

Local elections in England and Wales were held on 6 May 2021 for more than 145 English local councils for around 5,000 seats (including by-elections),[2] thirteen directly elected mayors in England,[3] and 39 police and crime commissioners in England and Wales.[4] There were also elections to the Scottish Parliament (129 seats), Senedd (Welsh Parliament) (60 seats) and London Assembly (25 seats), the last in conjunction with the London mayoral election.

Also on the same day as these local elections, there was a UK Parliament by-election for the constituency of Hartlepool.

In March 2020 the government announced that the elections scheduled for 7 May 2020 would be delayed for a year due to the COVID-19 pandemic. They were now held at the same time as the elections previously scheduled for 2021.[5] The seats up for election were those last contested in 2016 and 2017. New unitary authorities to replace the county and district councils in Northamptonshire and Buckinghamshire are due to hold their inaugural elections this year.

2021 United Kingdom local elections Intro articles: 2

Background

The local elections in May 2019 across a majority of councils in England saw the Conservative Party suffer significant losses to the Liberal Democrats, who regained councils they lost to the Conservatives in 2015. The Labour Party, despite making some gains, had a net loss of over eighty seats in areas that had traditionally voted for them, particularly to independent candidates. Local elections also took place at the same time in Northern Ireland, which saw a rise in the Alliance Party's representation across the region. At the 2019 European Parliament election, a few weeks later, the Conservatives had their lowest share of the vote in a nationwide election in their history, with the Brexit Party and the Liberal Democrats coming first and second, respectively.

On 12 December 2019, the UK held a snap general election that led to the Conservatives winning a majority of eighty in the House of Commons, while Labour had their worst share of the seats since the 1935 general election.[6] Following the election result, Jeremy Corbyn announced that he would step down as leader of the Labour Party;[7] Keir Starmer was elected the new leader on 4 April 2020.[8] The Liberal Democrats also held a leadership election after Jo Swinson lost her seat in the general election;[9] in the interim, the party's deputy leader Ed Davey and party president Mark Pack acted as co-leaders, and in August Davey was elected as leader.[10]

Prior to the elections, structural changes to local government in England merged some district and county councils into unitary authorities, which meant more power was consolidated; an example is Buckinghamshire Council, which replaced five councils in April 2020. In addition, new combined authorities (institutions which cover two or more local authorities) are being created, with the electorate of the West Yorkshire Combined Authority electing their mayor at this election. Intentions to reorganise councils in Cumbria, North Yorkshire and Somerset caused elections in those areas to be rescheduled for 2022.[11] More combined authorities and significant reorganisations were planned, but in 2020 the COVID-19 pandemic slowed down the government's devolution program for England.[12][13]

Postponement to 2021

A pandemic of a new strand of coronavirus spread across the world from February 2020. On 1 March, Health Secretary Matt Hancock issued a warning that "all options" were being considered if the virus spread further, including delaying the local elections, for the first time since the 2001 elections which were delayed by a month due to the foot-and-mouth outbreak.[14] On 12 March, the Association of Electoral Administrators asked the government to consider postponing the elections should the situation in the UK deteriorate.[15] The same day, the Electoral Commission recommended that the elections be delayed till the autumn.[16]

A day later, Prime Minister Boris Johnson decided to postpone the 2020 UK local elections until May 2021.[5][17] This decision was legislated for in the Coronavirus Act 2020, which was enacted on 25 March.[18] The bill gave the government the power to postpone any elections, including by-elections, which would otherwise have been held between the dates of 16 March 2020 and 5 May 2021.[19] To preserve the four-year electoral cycle, those elected in 2021 would serve three-year terms.[20]

On 4 November 2020, the Cabinet Office ruled out any further delays to local elections, after suggestions from some local authorities to defer the elections by a couple of weeks, in order to allow enough time to get the electoral roll in order without having to knock on doors during the second wave of the pandemic.[21] After the country went into a third national lockdown in January 2021, the County Councils Network called on Johnson to declare "as soon as possible" whether the elections would go ahead as planned. Suggestions had been put forward include delaying the elections until June or July; delaying them until the Autumn; and conducting them in May but entirely via postal voting.[22][23] On 9 January election officials stated that the local elections will take place as planned. However Johnson said this remains "under review".[24] It was confirmed in February by Chloe Smith and the Cabinet Office that the elections would in fact take place in line with the government's target to vaccinate all over 50s by the beginning of May.[25]

By-elections

The Coronavirus Act 2020 also postponed by-elections to fill casual vacancies occurring because a sitting councillor resigned or died.[18] On 15 March 2021, it was reported that more than 260 by-elections would take place alongside the planned council elections.[26]

In Bournemouth, Christchurch and Poole, by-elections were held in the wards of Canford Heath[27] and Commons.[28]

Restrictions on campaigns

In January 2021, government guidance on activity during the national lockdown was issued by the Minister of State for the Constitution and Devolution, Chloe Smith, stating that door-to-door campaigning or leafleting by individual political party activists was not possible under the restriction "You must not leave, or be outside of your home except where necessary".[29] Labour suspended leafleting and urged other parties to do the same, but the Liberal Democrats' leader Ed Davey defended the party's leafleting activities, arguing that the party had taken legal advice and that leafleting was allowed under an exemption for volunteer organisations.[30] Rights and democracy groups criticised the restrictions on campaigning, claiming that there was no leafleting ban in the coronavirus regulations and raising concerns it could interfere with the right to free expression and the functioning of democracy.[31]

On 26 February, the UK government said the restrictions in England would be changed to allow door-to-door campaigns from 8 March, and that similar guidance would be published by the Welsh and Scottish governments. Campaigners would be able to deliver leaflets and speak to electors on their doorsteps.[32][33]

2021 United Kingdom local elections Background articles: 39

Campaign

Going into the short campaign period, the Conservative Party started to develop a 6–7% poll lead on the Labour Party.[26]

On Thursday 11 March, Labour launched its local election campaign, with the party's leader Keir Starmer, deputy leader Angela Rayner, Mayor of London Sadiq Khan, First Minister of Wales Mark Drakeford, Scottish Labour leader Anas Sarwar and West Yorkshire metro-mayor candidate Tracy Brabin as speakers. The party focused its election priorities on giving nurses a pay rise.[34][35]

Following the death of Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh, political parties halted campaigning for local and devolved elections for a period of mourning of a few days.[36]

2021 United Kingdom local elections Campaign articles: 10

Voters and voting systems

In England, all residents of the areas covered who are 18 years or over and are a British or Irish citizen, a qualifying Commonwealth citizen, or a citizen of the European Union were eligible to vote.[37] A resident can be registered to vote in two local authorities, such as a student living away from home, and they may vote in both.[38] In Wales, all residents who are 16 years or over and are registered to vote, regardless of citizenship, will be eligible to vote.[39] The deadline to be registered to vote in the May 2021 elections is 11:59pm on 19 April 2021.[40]

Because this wave of local elections incorporates different positions, voters used different voting systems to elect politicians. Councillors were elected using first-past-the-post, meaning that the candidate with the most votes in a ward was elected.[38] Councils having "all-up" elections had block voting, where voters have a vote for each seat the ward represents and the top candidates are elected. All mayors of England and Police and Crime Commissioners of England and Wales were elected using the supplementary vote system, where voters select a first and second choice. If no candidate receives 50% of the vote, all except the top two are eliminated. If a voter's first choice candidate is eliminated, and their second choice is for one of the top two, then the second choice is counted.[41][42]

The Welsh and Scottish parliaments used the additional member system, or AMS. This means voters vote once in a single member constituency and once for party representation in their electoral region.[43] London uses two systems: the Mayor of London is elected using the supplementary vote system while the London Assembly uses AMS.[41]

2021 United Kingdom local elections Voters and voting systems articles: 6

England

On 13 March 2020, the Government announced that the 2020 elections would be postponed until 2021 in response to growing concerns about the spread of the COVID-19 coronavirus.[5][17]

County councils

Click or tap on the map to show the party in control of each council before the election
  Conservative
  No election
  No overall control

County councils are elected in full every four years, with the last election having been in 2017. County councils are the upper part of a two-tier system of local government, with the area each covers subdivided into district councils with different responsibilities. These are first-past-the-post elections with a mixture of single-member and multi-member electoral divisions.

There were previously twenty-six county councils, but there will only be twenty-four by the time of the election. Buckinghamshire County Council was replaced with a unitary authority, Buckinghamshire Council, on 1 April 2020.[44] Northamptonshire County Council "declared itself effectively bankrupt" in February 2018[45] and two new unitary authorities, North Northamptonshire and West Northamptonshire replaced it on 1 April 2021.[46]

In late February 2021 the government confirmed that council elections in Cumbria, North Yorkshire, and Somerset were to be rescheduled for May 2022 because of plans to re-organise the structure of local government in those areas. This meant that council elections for Cumbria County Council, North Yorkshire County Council and Somerset County Council were postponed until the May 2022 local elections.[11]

Council Seats Original year Previous control Result Details
Cambridgeshire 61 2021 Conservative No overall control (Lib Dem/Labour/Independent coalition) Details
Derbyshire 64 2021 Conservative Conservative Details
Devon 60 2021 Conservative Conservative Details
East Sussex 50 2021 Conservative Conservative Details
Essex 75 2021 Conservative Conservative Details
Gloucestershire 53 2021 Conservative Conservative Details
Hampshire 78 2021 Conservative Conservative Details
Hertfordshire 78 2021 Conservative Conservative Details
Kent 81 2021 Conservative Conservative Details
Lancashire 84 2021 Conservative Conservative Details
Leicestershire 55 2021 Conservative Conservative Details
Lincolnshire 70 2021 Conservative Conservative Details
Norfolk 84[a] 2021 Conservative Conservative Details
Nottinghamshire 66 2021 No overall control (Conservative/Mansfield Independent Forum coalition) Conservative Details
Oxfordshire 63 2021 No overall control (Conservative/Independent coalition) No overall control (Lib Dem/Labour//Green coalition) Details
Staffordshire 62 2021 Conservative Conservative Details
Suffolk 75[a] 2021 Conservative Conservative Details
Surrey 81 2021 Conservative Conservative Details
Warwickshire 57 2021 Conservative Conservative Details
West Sussex 70 2021 Conservative Conservative Details
Worcestershire 57 2021 Conservative Conservative Details
All 21 councils 1,632[b]
  1. ^ a b The number of councillors may change due to an ongoing boundary review
  2. ^ The total number of seats may change due to boundary reviews in Norfolk and Suffolk

Metropolitan boroughs

Click or tap on the map to show the party in control of each council before the election
  Labour
  Conservative
  No election
  No overall control

There are thirty-six metropolitan boroughs, which are single-tier local authorities. Thirty-three of them elect a third of their councillors every year for three years, with no election in each fourth year. These councils hold their elections on the same timetable, and were due to hold an election in 2020 but not in 2021. However, due to the coronavirus pandemic, the May 2020 elections were postponed to May 2021. The remaining three metropolitan boroughs elect their councillors in full every four years. Rotherham Metropolitan Borough Council was due to hold an election for all councillors in May 2020, but this was postponed to 2021. Doncaster Metropolitan Borough Council was due to elect their councillors in 2021. Birmingham City Council holds its elections on a four-year cycle from 2018, so is not due to hold an election until 2022; there were, however, by-elections in 4 wards.[47]

Due to boundary changes, Salford City Council also elected all of its councillors in 2021, and will now be returning to the thirds schedule. The remaining thirty-two metropolitan borough councils that elect their councillors in thirds did so as usual at this election.

Elections for all councillors

Council Seats Original year Previous control Result Details
Doncaster 55 2021 Labour Labour Details
Rotherham 59 2020 Labour Labour Details
Salford 60 2020 Labour Labour Details
All three councils 178

Elections for one third of councillors

Council Seats Original year Previous control Result Details
up of
Barnsley 21 63 2020 Labour Labour Details
Bolton 20 60 2020 No overall control (Conservative minority with Independent/Lib Dem/UKIP support) No overall control (Conservative minority with Independent/UKIP support) Details
Bradford 30 90 2020 Labour Labour Details
Bury 17 51 2020 Labour Labour Details
Calderdale 17 51 2020 Labour Labour Details
Coventry 18 54 2020 Labour Labour Details
Dudley 24 72 2020 No overall control (Conservative minority) Conservative Details
Gateshead 22 66 2020 Labour Labour Details
Kirklees 23 69 2020 No overall control (Labour minority) No overall control (Labour minority) Details
Knowsley 15 45 2020 Labour Labour Details
Leeds 33 99 2020 Labour Labour Details
Liverpool 30 90 2020 Labour Labour Details
Manchester 32 96 2020 Labour Labour Details
Newcastle upon Tyne 26 78 2020 Labour Labour Details
North Tyneside 20 60 2020 Labour Labour Details
Oldham 20 60 2020 Labour Labour Details
Rochdale 20 60 2020 Labour Labour Details
Sandwell 24 72 2020 Labour Labour Details
Sefton 22 66 2020 Labour Labour Details
Sheffield 28 84 2020 Labour No overall control (Labour/Green coalition) Details
Solihull 17 51 2020 Conservative Conservative Details
South Tyneside 18 54 2020 Labour Labour Details
St Helens 16 48 2020 Labour Labour Details
Stockport 21 63 2020 No overall control (Labour minority) No overall control (Labour minority) Details
Sunderland 25 75 2020 Labour Labour Details
Tameside 19 57 2020 Labour Labour Details
Trafford 21 63 2020 Labour Labour Details
Wakefield 21 63 2020 Labour Labour Details
Walsall 20 60 2020 Conservative Conservative Details
Wigan 25 75 2020 Labour Labour Details
Wirral 22 66 2020 No overall control (Labour minority) No overall control (Labour minority) Details
Wolverhampton 20 60 2020 Labour Labour Details
All 32 councils 729 2,187

Unitary authorities

Click or tap on the map to show the party in control of each council before the election
  Labour
  Conservative
  No election
  No overall control

There were previously fifty-five unitary authorities, but three more were created by the May elections. Buckinghamshire County Council was replaced with a unitary authority, Buckinghamshire Council, on 1 April 2020;[48] the first election to the new unitary authority was scheduled for May 2020, but due to the coronavirus pandemic was rescheduled for May 2021. Subsequent elections are due to be held every four years from 2025.[44] Northamptonshire County Council was replaced with two unitary authorities, North Northamptonshire and West Northamptonshire on 1 April 2021.[49] The first elections to the shadow authorities (temporary council structures before the council formally begins) were planned to be held in May 2020, but due to the coronavirus pandemic have been rescheduled to May 2021. Subsequent elections will be held every four years from 2025.[47]

Of the resulting fifty-eight unitary authorities, thirty elect all their councillors every four years on the cycle from 2019, so are not due to hold elections until 2023. Six elect their councillors every four years and were originally planning to elect in 2021. The three new unitary authorities were scheduled to hold their elections in 2020 and then every four years from 2025, before the 2020 local elections were postponed to 2021. Two unitary authorities were scheduled to elect all their councillors in 2020 but these have also been postponed to 2021. Seventeen unitary authorities elect a third of their councillors every year for three years including 2020 but not 2021, and these elections have been postponed to 2021. Two of these, Halton and Hartlepool, have had boundary changes that mean they are electing all of their councillors in 2021.[50][51]

Elections for all councillors

Council Seats Original year Previous control Result Details
Bristol 70 2020 Labour No overall control (Labour minority) Details
Buckinghamshire[a] 147 2020 New unitary authority Conservative Details
Cornwall 87[b] 2021 No overall control (Lib Dem/Independent coalition) Conservative Details
County Durham 126 2021 Labour No overall control (Conservative/Lib Dem/Independent coalition) Details
Halton 54[b] 2020 Labour Labour Details
Hartlepool 36[b] 2020 No overall control (Conservative/Independent Union/Veterans and People's Party coalition) No overall control (Conservative/Independent coalition) Details
Isle of Wight 39[b] 2021 Conservative No overall control (Independent/Green/Island Independents/Our Island/Lib Dem/Labour/Vectis Party coalition) Details
North Northamptonshire[a] 78 2020 New unitary authority Conservative Details
Northumberland 67 2021 No overall control (Conservative minority) Conservative Details
Shropshire 74 2021 Conservative Conservative Details
Warrington 58 2020 Labour Labour Details
West Northamptonshire[a] 93 2020 New unitary authority Conservative Details
Wiltshire 98[b] 2021 Conservative Conservative Details
All thirteen councils 986

Elections for one third of councillors

Council Seats Original year Previous control Result Details
up of
Blackburn with Darwen 17 51 2020 Labour Labour Details
Derby 17 51 2020 No overall control (Conservative minority) No overall control (Conservative minority) Details
Hull 19 57 2020 Labour Labour Details
Milton Keynes 19 57 2020 No overall control (Labour minority with Lib Dem support) No overall control (Labour/Lib Dem coalition) Details
North East Lincolnshire 12 42 2020 Conservative Conservative Details
Peterborough 22 60 2020 No overall control (Conservative minority with Independent support) No overall control (Conservative minority with Independent support) Details
Plymouth 19 57 2020 Labour No overall control (Conservative minority) Details
Portsmouth 14 42 2020 No overall control (Lib Dem minority) No overall control (Lib Dem minority with Labour/Progressive Portsmouth People support) Details
Reading 16 46 2020 Labour Labour Details
Slough 14 42 2020 Labour Labour Details
Southampton 16 48 2020 Labour Conservative Details
Southend 17 51 2020 No overall control (Labour/Independent/Lib Dem coalition) No overall control (Labour/Independent/Lib Dem coalition) Details
Swindon 19 57 2020 Conservative Conservative Details
Thurrock 17 49 2020 Conservative Conservative Details
Wokingham 18 54 2020 Conservative Conservative Details
All fifteen councils 255 764

District councils

Click or tap on the map to show the party in control of each council before the election
  Labour
  Conservative
  Liberal Democrats
  Independent
  No election
  No overall control

62 out of the 182 non-metropolitan district councils held council elections.

Whole district councils

Seven district councils have all of their seats up for election. The seats for Gloucester and Stroud were last up for election in 2016. Basingstoke and Deane, Cambridge, Chorley, Oxford and Pendle have all seats up for election due to ward boundary changes.[52][53]

Council Previous control Result Details
Gloucester No overall control (Conservative minority) Conservative Details
Stroud No overall control (Labour/Green/Lib Dem coalition) No overall control (Labour/Green/Lib Dem coalition) Details
Basingstoke and Deane No overall control (Conservative minority) Conservative Details
Cambridge Labour Labour Details
Chorley Labour Labour Details
Oxford Labour Labour Details
Pendle No overall control (Labour/Lib Dem coalition) Conservative Details

Half of councils

Six councils have half of their seats up for election. These seats were last up for election in 2016, and were due to be contested in 2020.[52]

Council Previous control Result Details
Adur Conservative Conservative Details
Cheltenham Liberal Democrats Liberal Democrats Details
Fareham Conservative Conservative Details
Gosport Conservative Conservative Details
Hastings Labour Labour Details
Nuneaton and Bedworth No overall control (Labour minority) Conservative Details

One-third of district councils

Forty-seven councils have one-third of their seats up for election. These seats were last up for election in 2016, and were due to be contested in 2020.[52] Elections in Craven, Carlisle and South Lakeland have been postponed due to pending local government reorganisation.

Council Previous control Result Details
Amber Valley Labour Conservative Details
Basildon No overall control (Labour/Independent Coalition) Conservative Details
Brentwood Conservative Conservative Details
Broxbourne Conservative Conservative Details
Burnley No overall control (Labour minority) No overall control (Labour/Lib Dem coalition) Details
Cannock Chase No overall control (Labour minority) Conservative Details
Castle Point Conservative Conservative Details
Cherwell Conservative Conservative Details
Colchester No overall control (Labour/Lib Dem Coalition) No overall control (Conservative/Independent Coalition) Details
Crawley No overall control (Labour minority) No overall control (Labour/Independent coalition) Details
Eastleigh Liberal Democrats Liberal Democrats Details
Elmbridge No overall control (Lib Dem/Residents Associations Coalition) No overall control (Lib Dem/Residents Association Coalition) Details
Epping Forest Conservative Conservative Details
Exeter Labour Labour Details
Harlow Labour Conservative Details
Hart No overall control (Lib Dem/Community Campaign Coalition) No overall control (Lib Dem/Community Campaign Coalition) Details
Havant Conservative Conservative Details
Hyndburn Labour Labour Details
Ipswich Labour Labour Details
Lincoln Labour Labour Details
Maidstone No overall control (Lib Dem/Independent Coalition) Conservative Details
Mole Valley Liberal Democrats Liberal Democrats Details
North Hertfordshire No overall control (Labour/Lib Dem coalition) No overall control (Labour/Lib Dem coalition) Details
Norwich Labour Labour Details
Preston Labour Labour Details
Redditch Conservative Conservative Details
Reigate and Banstead Conservative Conservative Details
Rochford Conservative Conservative Details
Rossendale Labour No overall control (Labour minority) Details
Rugby Conservative Conservative Details
Runnymede Conservative Conservative Details
Rushmoor Conservative Conservative Details
St Albans No overall control (Lib Dem minority) Liberal Democrats Details
Stevenage Labour Labour Details
Tamworth Conservative Conservative Details
Tandridge No overall control (Conservative minority) No overall control (Independent/Residents Group minority with Lib Dem support) Details
Three Rivers Liberal Democrats Liberal Democrats Details
Tunbridge Wells Conservative No overall control (Conservative minority) Details
Watford Liberal Democrats Liberal Democrats Details
Welwyn Hatfield No overall control (Conservative minority) Conservative Details
West Lancashire Labour No overall control (Labour minority) Details
West Oxfordshire Conservative Conservative Details
Winchester Liberal Democrats Liberal Democrats Details
Woking No overall control (Conservative minority) No overall control (Conservative minority) Details
Worcester No overall control (Conservative/Labour coalition) Conservative Details
Worthing Conservative Conservative Details

London Assembly

The London Assembly consists of twenty-five elected members and acts as a scrutiny panel to the mayor. Members are elected using the additional member system, which elects members using both constituencies and a London-wide electoral region.

City of London Corporation

The Court of Common Council is the main decision-making body of the City of London Corporation, which governs the City of London. The 100 councillors are elected across twenty-five wards. Elections were due on 18 March 2021, but as a result of the coronavirus pandemic were delayed to March 2022.[54]

Council of the Isles of Scilly

The Council of the Isles of Scilly is the local government authority for the Isles of Scilly. It has sixteen seats, which in the previous 2017 election were all won by independent candidates.

Mayors

Mayor of London

The Mayor of London is normally elected for four years, although due to the rescheduling of the 2020 election, the election in 2021 will be for a three-year term. The incumbent mayor Sadiq Khan, won re-election with 40.0% of first preference votes, and 55.2% of second preference votes. He will serve until 2024.

Combined authority mayors

Seven combined authority mayors were up for election.

Combined authority Original year Previous mayor Elected mayor Details
Cambridgeshire and Peterborough 2021 James Palmer (Con) Nik Johnson (Lab) Details
Greater Manchester 2020 Andy Burnham (Lab) Andy Burnham (Lab) Details
Liverpool City Region 2020 Steve Rotheram (Lab) Steve Rotheram (Lab) Details
Tees Valley 2020 Ben Houchen (Con) Ben Houchen (Con) Details
West Midlands 2020 Andy Street (Con) Andy Street (Con) Details
West of England 2021 Tim Bowles (Con) Dan Norris (Lab) Details
West Yorkshire 2021 Role established Tracy Brabin (Lab) Details

Single authority mayors

Five single authority mayors were up for election.

Local authority Original year Previous Mayor Mayor-elect Details
Bristol 2020 Marvin Rees (Lab) Marvin Rees (Lab) Details
Doncaster 2021 Ros Jones (Lab) Ros Jones (Lab) Details
Liverpool 2020 Joe Anderson[c] (Lab) Joanne Anderson (Lab) Details
North Tyneside 2021 Norma Redfearn (Lab) Norma Redfearn (Lab) Details
Salford 2020 Paul Dennett (Lab) Paul Dennett (Lab) Details

Police and crime commissioner elections

Thirty-five police and crime commissioners in England are up for election, together with four police, fire and crime commissioners.

2021 United Kingdom local elections England articles: 325