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110th United States Congress

2007-2009 U.S. Congress

Top 10 110th United States Congress related articles

110th United States Congress
109th ←
→ 111th

January 3, 2007 – January 3, 2009
Senate PresidentDick Cheney (R)
Senate Pres. pro temRobert Byrd (D)
House SpeakerNancy Pelosi (D)
Members100 senators
435 representatives
5 non-voting delegates
Senate MajorityDemocratic (coalition)
House MajorityDemocratic
Sessions
1st: January 4, 2007 – December 19, 2007
2nd: January 3, 2008 – January 3, 2009

The 110th United States Congress was a meeting of the legislative branch of the United States federal government, between January 3, 2007, and January 3, 2009, during the last two years of the second term of President George W. Bush. It was composed of the Senate and the House of Representatives. The apportionment of seats in the House was based on the 2000 U.S. Census.[1]

The Democratic Party controlled a majority in both chambers for the first time since the end of the 103rd Congress in 1995. Although the Democrats held fewer than 50 Senate seats, they had an operational majority because the two independent senators caucused with the Democrats for organizational purposes. No Democratic-held seats had fallen to the Republican Party in the 2006 elections.[2] Democrat Nancy Pelosi became the first female Speaker of the House.[3] The House also received the first Muslim (Keith Ellison)[4][5] and Buddhist (Hank Johnson and Mazie Hirono)[6] members of Congress.

110th United States Congress Intro articles: 13

Major events

Members debated initiatives such as the Democrats' 100-Hour Plan and the Iraq War troop surge of 2007.[7][8][9]

President Bush delivered the 2007 State of the Union Address on January 23, 2007
President Bush delivered the 2008 State of the Union Address on January 28, 2008

Support for the Iraq War

Following President Bush's 2007 State of the Union Address, Congress debated his proposal to create a troop surge to increase security in Iraq. The House of Representatives passed a non-binding measure opposing the surge and then a $124 billion emergency spending measure to fund the war, which included language that dictated troop levels and withdrawal schedules. President Bush, however, vetoed the bill as promised, making this his second veto while in office. Both houses of Congress subsequently passed a bill funding the war without timelines, but with benchmarks for the Iraqi government and money for other spending projects like disaster relief.

Other events

110th United States Congress Major events articles: 20

Major legislation

Contents: Enacted Pending or failed Vetoed

These are partial lists of prominent enacted legislation and pending bills.

See also: 2008 Congressional Record, Vol. 154, Page D845 , Resume of Congressional Activity

Enacted

House in Salinas, California under foreclosure, following the bursting of the U.S. real estate bubble.

More information: Public Laws for the 110th Congress and Complete index of Public and Private Laws for 110th Congress at GPO

Proposed, but not enacted

in (alphabetical order)

Vetoed

110th United States Congress Major legislation articles: 49

Treaties ratified

Select committees

Hearings

Party summary

Senate

  Democratic Party: 49 members.
  Republican Party: 49 members.
  Independents: 2 members.

Membership changed with one death and two resignations.

Affiliation Party
(Shading indicates majority caucus)
Total  
Democratic Independent Republican Vacant
End of previous Congress 44 1 55 100 0
Begin 49 2[12][13] 49 100 0
June 4, 2007 48 99 1
June 25, 2007 49 100 0
December 18, 2007 48 99 1
December 31, 2007 49 100 0
November 16, 2008 48 99 1
Final voting share 50.5% 49.5%
Beginning of the next Congress 55 2 41 98 2

House of Representatives

Membership at the beginning of the 110th Congress:
  Democratic Party: 233 members.
  Republican Party: 202 members.

Membership fluctuated with seven deaths and eight resignations. Democrats achieved a net gain of three seats as a result of their victories in special elections. See Changes in membership, below.

Affiliation Party
(Shading indicates majority caucus)
Total
Democratic Republican Vacant
End of previous Congress 203[a] 229 432 3
Begin 233 202 435 0
February 13, 2007 201 434 1
April 22, 2007 232 433 2
July 1, 2007 231 432 3
July 17, 2007 202 433 2
August 21, 2007 232 434 1
September 5, 2007 201 433 2
October 10, 2007 200 432 3
October 16, 2007 233 433 2
November 26, 2007 199 432 3
December 11, 2007 201 434 1
December 15, 2007 232 433 2
December 31, 2007 200 432 3
January 14, 2008 199 431 4
February 2, 2008 198 430 5
February 11, 2008 231 429 6
March 8, 2008 232 430 5
March 11, 2008 233 431 4
April 8, 2008 234 432 3
May 3, 2008 235 199 434 1
May 13, 2008 236 435 0
May 31, 2008 235 434 1
June 17, 2008 236 435 0
August 20, 2008 235 434 1
November 18, 2008 236 435 0
November 24, 2008 198 434 1
January 2, 2009 235 433 2
Final voting share 54.3% 45.7%
Non-voting members 4 1 5 0
Beginning of next Congress 256 178 434 1

110th United States Congress Treaties ratified articles: 5

Leadership

Section contents: Senate: Majority (D), Minority (R)House: Majority (D), Minority (R)

Senate

Senate President
Senate President pro Tempore

Majority (Democratic) leadership

Minority (Republican) leadership

House of Representatives

Speaker of the House

Majority (Democratic) leadership

Minority (Republican) leadership

110th United States Congress Leadership articles: 83

Members

Senate

Senators are listed by state, then by class, In this Congress, Class 2 meant their term ended with this Congress, requiring reelection in 2008; Class 3 meant their term began in the last Congress, requiring reelection in 2010; and Class 1 meant their term began in this Congress, requiring reelection in 2012.

House of Representatives