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swing definition

Overview

This page has 39 definitions of swing with English translations in 6 languages. Swing is a verb and noun. Examples of how to use swing in a sentence are shown. Also define these 53 related words and terms: off-centre, fixed, point, dance, ride, wife, swapping, gallows, cricket, fluctuate, change, wave, result, outcome, election, afford, financially, music, notes, augment, rhythm, trajectory, boxing, punch, engineering, shape, lathe, carpentry, nautical, sweep, compass, children, playground, acrobats, circus, porch, relax, style, genre, politics, vote, opposition, incumbent, sideways, turn, diameter, musical theater, performer, understudy, liberty, hook, swing, and swinging.

See also: Swing

English swing definition

Etymology

From Middle English swingen, from Old English swingan, from Proto-Germanic *swinganą (compare Low German swingen, German schwingen, Dutch zwingen, Swedish svinga), from Proto-Indo-European *sweng- (compare Scottish Gaelic seang (thin)). Related to swink.

Pronunciation

Verb

swing (third-person singular simple present swings, present participle swinging, simple past swung or (archaic or dialectal) swang, past participle swung or (archaic) swungen)

  1. (intransitive) To rotate about an off-centre fixed point.
    The plant swung in the breeze.
    • 1912, Edgar Rice Burroughs, Tarzan of the Apes, Chapter 12
      With one accord the tribe swung rapidly toward the frightened cries, and there found Terkoz holding an old female by the hair and beating her unmercifully with his great hands.
    • 2012 February 29, Troy Denning, Star Wars: Fate of the Jedi: Apocalypse[1], Random House, →ISBN, page 3:
      The starliner swung into orbit around the planet Coruscant, and beyond the observation bubble appeared a glittering expanse of a billion golden lights. Through a thousand centuries of strife, those lights continued to shine.
    • Fixed definition
      simple past tense and past participle of fix
  2. (intransitive) To dance.
  3. (intransitive) To ride on a swing.
    The children laughed as they swung.
  4. (intransitive) To participate in the swinging lifestyle; to participate in wife-swapping.
    • Swapping definition
      The act by which something is swapped; an exchange.
  5. (intransitive) To hang from the gallows.
    • 1891, Arthur Conan Doyle, The Red-Headed League:
      “It's all clear,” he whispered. “Have you the chisel and the bags? Great Scott! Jump, Archie, jump, and I'll swing for it!”
      Sherlock Holmes had sprung out and seized the intruder by the collar. The other dived down the hole, and I heard the sound of rending cloth as Jones clutched at his skirts.
  6. (intransitive, cricket, of a ball) to move sideways in its trajectory.
  7. (intransitive) To fluctuate or change.
    It wasn't long before the crowd's mood swung towards restless irritability.
  8. (transitive) To move (an object) backward and forward; to wave.
    He swung his sword as hard as he could.
  9. (transitive) To change (a numerical result); especially to change the outcome of an election.
    • Result definition
      To proceed, spring up or rise, as a consequence, from facts, arguments, premises, combination of circumstances, consultation, thought or endeavor. (1 of 4 result definitions)
    • Outcome definition
      That which is produced or occurs as a result of an event or process. (1 of 4 outcome definitions)
  10. (transitive) To make (something) work; especially to afford (something) financially.
    If it’s not too expensive, I think we can swing it.
    • Afford definition
      To incur, stand, or bear without serious detriment, as an act which might under other circumstances be injurious;with an auxiliary, as can, could, might, etc.; to be able or rich enough. (1 of 4 afford definitions)
    • Financially definition
      In terms of finance or money.
  11. (transitive, music) To play notes that are in pairs by making the first of the pair slightly longer than written (augmentation) and the second shorter, resulting in a bouncy, uneven rhythm.
  12. (transitive, cricket) (of a bowler) to make the ball move sideways in its trajectory.
  13. (transitive and intransitive, boxing) To move one's arm in a punching motion.
  14. (transitive) In dancing, to turn around in a small circle with one's partner, holding hands or arms.
    "to swing one's partner", or simply "to swing"
  15. (transitive, engineering) To admit or turn something for the purpose of shaping it; said of a lathe.
    The lathe can swing a pulley of 12 inches diameter.
  16. (transitive, carpentry) To put (a door, gate, etc.) on hinges so that it can swing or turn.
  17. (nautical) To turn round by action of wind or tide when at anchor.
    A ship swings with the tide.

Troponyms

  • (to rotate about an off-centre fixed point): pivot, swivel

Derived terms

Translations

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Dictionary:Entry layout § Translations.

Noun

swing (countable and uncountable, plural swings)

  1. The manner in which something is swung.
    He worked tirelessly to improve his golf swing.
    Door swing indicates direction the door opens.
    the swing of a pendulum
    • 2008 January–February, “70 Ways to Improve Every Day of the Week”, in Men's Health, volume 23, number 1, ISSN 1054-4836, page 135:
      Improve your golf swing by taking your mate to the driving range. If you're good, you can show off and give her some tips. If you stink, play it for laughs.
  2. The sweep or compass of a swinging body.
  3. A line, cord, or other thing suspended and hanging loose, upon which anything may swing.
  4. A hanging seat in a children's playground, for acrobats in a circus, or on a porch for relaxing.
    • 1918, W. B. Maxwell, chapter 12, in The Mirror and the Lamp:
      To Edward [] he was terrible, nerve-inflaming, poisonously asphyxiating. He sat rocking himself in the late Mr. Churchill's swing chair, smoking and twaddling.
  5. A dance style.
  6. (music) The genre of music associated with this dance style.
    • Genre definition
      A kind; a stylistic category or sort, especially of literature or other artworks.
  7. The amount of change towards or away from something.
    • 1853, Elizabeth Gaskell, Cranford
      Miss Pole came round with a swing to as vehement a belief in the sorrowful tale as she had been sceptical before []
    1. (politics) In an election, the increase or decrease in the number of votes for opposition parties compared with votes for the incumbent party.
      The polls showed a wide swing to Labour.
  8. (cricket) Sideways movement of the ball as it flies through the air.
  9. Capacity of a turning lathe, as determined by the diameter of the largest object that can be turned in it.
    • Turn definition
      To make a non-linear physical movement.
      1. Of a body, person, etc, to move around an axis through itself. (1 of 35 turn definitions)
  10. In a musical theater production, a performer who understudies several roles.
    • Musical Theater definition
      A genre of theater that combines spoken dialogue with song and dance.
  11. A basic dance step in which a pair link hands and turn round together in a circle.
  12. This term needs a definition. Please help out and add a definition, then remove the text {{rfdef}}.
    • 2021 February 4, Raj Chohan, “Erling Braut Haaland: Would Man City, Liverpool, Man Utd or Chelsea suit striker best?”, in BBC Sport[2]:
      Jesus' finishing has been one of the main concerns - since the start of last season the 23-year-old has underperformed his Premier League expected goals tally by 6.97goals [sic] (in short, he has scored seven fewer goals than would be expected from the chances presented to him).
      In contrast, Haaland is overperforming by 6.83 goals since joining Dortmund, which is almost a 14-goal swing between the pair.
  13. (obsolete) Free course; unrestrained liberty.
  14. Influence or power of anything put in motion.
  15. (boxing) A type of hook with the arm more extended.

Quotations

  • 1937 June 11, Judy Garland, “All God’s Chillun Got Rhythm”, A day at the races, Sam Wood (director), Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer
    All God’s chillun got rhythm. All God's chillun got swing.
    Maybe haven't got money, maybe haven't got shoes.
    All God’s chillun got rhythm for to push away their blues.

Derived terms

Translations

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Dictionary:Entry layout § Translations.

Anagrams


Czech swing definition

Noun

swing m

  1. swing (dance)

Further reading

  • swing in Příruční slovník jazyka českého, 1935–1957
  • swing in Slovník spisovného jazyka českého, 1960–1971, 1989

French swing definition

Etymology

Borrowed from English swing.

Pronunciation

Noun

swing m (plural swings)

  1. swing; several senses

Italian swing definition

Etymology

Borrowed from English swing.

Noun

swing m (invariable)

  1. swing (music and dance style; golf swing)

Portuguese swing definition

Etymology

Borrowed from English swing.

Noun

swing m (plural swings)

  1. swing (a dance and music style)
  2. swinging (exchange of partners for sex)

Spanish swing definition

Etymology

Borrowed from English swing.

Pronunciation

Noun

swing m (plural swings)

  1. swing (dance)