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note definition

Overview

This page has 78 definitions of note with English translations in 14 languages. Note is a noun, verb, an adjective, participle and adverb. Examples of how to use note in a sentence are shown. Also define these 95 related words and terms: symbol, annotation, mark, token, character, sign, remark, comment, memorandum, minute, letter, billet, treatise, treatment, discussion, paper, discourse, missive, finance, promissory note, money, banknote, music, tone, key, observation, notice, heed, reputation, distinction, critical, notification, information, intelligence, disgrace, observe, denote, designate, annotate, law, notary, needed, necessary, business, duty, work, useful, noot, note, notat, notits, mechanics, supply, board, groove, grade, bill, check, touch, hint, noter, notar, noto, nota, notus, nut, goeth, with, that, not, tune, nyta, computing, notebook, eu, ele, ela, você, notă, use, benefit, necessity, occasion, employment, task, purpose, function, office, employ, need, usted, yo, él, ella, and night.

See also: Note, noté, and Nöte

English note definition

Pronunciation

Etymology 1

From Middle English note, from Old English not, nōt (note, mark, sign) and Old French note (letter, note), both from Latin nota (mark, sign, remark, note).

Noun

note (countable and uncountable, plural notes)

  1. (heading) A symbol or annotation.
    1. A mark or token by which a thing may be known; a visible sign; a character; a distinctive mark or feature; a characteristic quality.
      • 1594, Richard Hooker, Of the Lawes of Ecclesiastical Politie, London: William Stansbye, published 1622, book III, page 89:
        As therefore they that are of the Myſticall Body of Chriſt, haue thoſe inward Graces and Vertues, whereby they differ from all others which are not of the ſame Body ; againe, whoſoeuer appertaine to the Viſible Body of the Church, they haue alſo the notes of externall Profeſſion, whereby the World knoweth what they are.
      • 1841, John Henry Newman, “A Letter to the Right Reverend Father in God, Richard, Lord Bishop of Oxford, on Occasion of No. 90, in the Series Called The Tracts for the Times”, Oxford: John Henry Parker, page 39:
        She [the Anglican church] has the Note of possession, the Note of freedom from party-titles ; the Note of life, a tough life and a vigorous ; she has ancient descent, unbroken continuance, agreement in doctrine with the ancient Church.
      • 1888, Mary Augusta Ward, Robert Elsmere, volume I, London: Macmillan and Co., page 217:
        What a note of youth, of imagination, of impulsive eagerness, there was through it all !
      • 1962 October, Brian Haresnape, “Focus on B.R. passenger stations”, in Modern Railways, page 251:
        For the first ten years of nationalisation a further note of overall gloom was added by the depressing policy of unimaginative Regional colour schemes, indifferently applied.
      • 1963, Margery Allingham, chapter 20, in The China Governess[1]:
        The story struck the depressingly familiar note with which true stories ring in the tried ears of experienced policemen. No one queried it. It was in the classic pattern of human weakness, mean and embarrassing and sad.
    2. A mark, or sign, made to call attention, to point out something to notice, or the like; a sign, or token, proving or giving evidence.
    3. A brief remark; a marginal comment or explanation; hence, an annotation on a text or author; a comment; a critical, explanatory, or illustrative observation.
    • Mark definition
      Boundary, land within a boundary.
      1. A boundary; a border or frontier.
      2. A boundary-post or fence.
      3. A stone or post used to indicate position and guide travellers.
      4. A type of small region or principality.
      5. A common, or area of common land, especially among early Germanic peoples.
      (1 of 35 mark definitions)
  2. (heading) A written or printed communication or commitment.
    1. A brief piece of writing intended to assist the memory; a memorandum; a minute.
      I left him a note to remind him to take out the trash.
    2. A short informal letter; a billet.
    3. (academic) An academic treatise (often without regard to length); a treatment; a discussion paper; (loosely) any contribution to an academic discourse.
    4. A diplomatic missive or written communication.
    5. (finance) A written or printed paper acknowledging a debt, and promising payment
      a promissory note
      a note of hand
      a negotiable note
    6. (obsolete) A list of items or of charges; an account.
    7. A piece of paper money; a banknote.
      I didn't have any coins to pay with, so I used a note.
    8. (extension) A small size of paper used for writing letters or notes.
  3. (music, heading) A sound.
    1. A character, variously formed, to indicate the length of a tone, and variously placed upon the staff to indicate its pitch.
    2. A musical sound; a tone; an utterance; a tune.
    3. (by extension) A key of the piano or organ.
    4. (by extension) A call or song of a bird.
      • 1886, Peter Christen Asbjørnsen, H.L. Brækstad, transl., Folk and Fairy Tales, page 85:
        We heard the peculiar note of the woodcock, which resembles the repeated croaking of the frog, followed by a sharp hissing sound, somewhat like the noisy chirping of the wagtail[.]
  4. (uncountable) Observation; notice; heed.
    • c. 1596–1598, William Shakespeare, “The Merchant of Venice”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies: Published According to the True Originall Copies (First Folio), London: [] Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, OCLC 606515358, [Act V, scene i]:
      Go in Nerriſſa, / Giue order to my ſeruants, that they take / No note at all of our being abſent hence, / Nor you Lorenzo, Ieſſica nor you.
    • 1625, Francis Bacon, “Of ceremonies and reſpects”, in The Works of Francis Bacon, volume III, London: J. and J. Knapton et al., published 1730, page 373:
      So it is true, that ſmall matters win great commendation, becauſe they are continually in uſe, and in note ; whereas the occaſion of any great virtue cometh but on feſtivals.
  5. (uncountable) Reputation; distinction.
    a poet of note
    • Reputation definition
      What somebody is known for.
  6. A critical comment.
    Your performance was fantastic! I have just one note: you were a little flat in bars 35 and 36.
  7. (obsolete) Notification; information; intelligence.
    • Information definition
      That which resolves uncertainty; anything that answers the question of "what a given entity is". (1 of 13 information definitions)
  8. (obsolete) Mark of disgrace.
Synonyms
Derived terms
 
Translations
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Dictionary:Entry layout § Translations.

Verb

note (third-person singular simple present notes, present participle noting, simple past and past participle noted)

  1. (transitive) To notice with care; to observe; to remark; to heed.
    If you look to the left, you can note the old cathedral.
  2. (transitive) To record in writing; to make a memorandum of.
    We noted his speech.
  3. (transitive) To denote; to designate.
    The modular multiplicative inverse of x may be noted x-1.
  4. (transitive) To annotate.
  5. (transitive) To set down in musical characters.
  6. (transitive, law) To record on the back of (a bill, draft, etc.) a refusal of acceptance, as the ground of a protest, which is done officially by a notary.
    • 2020 October 28, Kimberly Budd for the Supreme Judicial Court of Massachusetts, case SJC-12769:
      By noting the protest, notaries could date certificates when they were received, making it easier to comply with time restrictions associated with protesting.
Derived terms
Translations
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Dictionary:Entry layout § Translations.

See also

Etymology 2

From Middle English note (use, usefulness, profit), from Old English notu (use, enjoyment, advantage, profit, utility), from Proto-Germanic *nutō (enjoyment, utilisation), from Proto-Indo-European *newd- (to acquire, make use of). Cognate with West Frisian not (yield, produce, crop), Dutch genot (enjoyment, pleasure), Dutch nut (usefulness, utility, behoof), German Nutzen (benefit, usefulness, utility), Icelandic not (use, noun). Related also to Old English notian (to enjoy, make use of, employ), Old English nēotan (to use, enjoy), Old High German niozan (to use, enjoy), Modern German benutzen (to use). Related to nait.

Alternative forms

Noun

note (usually uncountable, plural notes)

  1. (uncountable, Britain dialectal, Northern England, Ireland, Scotland) That which is needed or necessary; business; duty; work.
    • 1303, Roberd of Brunnè, “The Seventh Commandment”, in Frederick James Furnivall, editor, Handlyng Synne, London: J. B. Nichols and Sons, published 1862, lines 2073–6, page 67:
      But þefte serueþ of wykkede note, / Hyt hangeþ hys mayster by þe þrote, / Or doþe hym lese hys godë fame, / Or bryngeþ hym oute of þe towne for shame.
    • 1838, William Marriott, “The Deluge”, in A Collection of English Miracle-Plays or Mysteries, Basel: Schweighauser & Co, page 11:
      And have thou that for thy note !
    • 1897 May 27, Halifax Courier, quoted in 1903, Joseph Wright, English Dialect Dictionary, volume IV, London: Henry Frowde, page 302:
      Tha'll keep me at this noit all day... Om always at this noit.
    • 1962, Arthur C. Cawley, Everyman, and Medieval Miracle Plays[2], page 125:
      Thou canst do thy note; that have I espied.
  2. (Britain dialectal, Northern England, Ireland, Scotland) The giving of milk by a cow or sow; the period following calving or farrowing during which a cow or sow is at her most useful (i.e. gives milk); the milk given by a cow or sow during such a period.
    • 1843, The Farmer's Magazine, page 384:
      The supply of horned cattle at this fair was great, but the business done was confined to fleshy barreners of feeding qualities and superior new-calved heifers, and those at early note, with appearance of being useful; [...]
    • 1875, Belfast Paper:
      For sale, a Kerry cow, five years old, at her note in May.
    • 1888, S. O. Addy Gloss, Words Sheffield, page 160:
      A cow is said to be in note when she is in milk.
    • 1922, P. MacGill, Lanty Hanlon page 11:
      A man who drank spring water when his one cow was near note.
    • 1996, C. I. Macafee Conc., Ulster Dict. at Note:
      Be at her note, be near note, come forward to her note, of a cow or sow, be near the time for calving or farrowing.
Derived terms

Further reading

Anagrams


Afrikaans note definition

Noun

note

  1. plural of noot

Danish note definition

Etymology 1

From English note, from Italian nota, from Latin nota.

Noun

note c (singular definite noten, plural indefinite noter)

  1. note
    Synonyms: notat, notits
    • Note definition
      A symbol or annotation.
      1. A mark or token by which a thing may be known; a visible sign; a character; a distinctive mark or feature; a characteristic quality.
      2. A mark, or sign, made to call attention, to point out something to notice, or the like; a sign, or token, proving or giving evidence.
      3. A brief remark; a marginal comment or explanation; hence, an annotation on a text or author; a comment; a critical, explanatory, or illustrative observation.
      (1 of 23 note definitions)
    • Notat definition
      past participle of notar
Inflection

Etymology 2

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Verb

note

  1. (mechanics) To supply a board to a groove.
Conjugation

Template:da-conj-base


French note definition

Etymology

Borrowed from Latin nota.

Pronunciation

Noun

note f (plural notes)

  1. note (written or spoken)
  2. mark (UK), grade (US)
  3. bill (UK, US), check (US)
    • Bill definition
      Any of various bladed or pointed hand weapons, originally designating an Anglo-Saxon sword, and later a weapon of infantry, especially in the 14th and 15th centuries, commonly consisting of a broad, heavy, double-edged, hook-shaped blade, with a short pike at the back and another at the top, attached to the end of a long staff. (1 of 5 bill definitions)
    • Check definition
      A situation in which the king is directly threatened by an opposing piece. (1 of 12 check definitions)
  4. (music) note
  5. touch, hint, note

Derived terms

Descendants

  • Turkish: not

Verb

note

  1. inflection of noter:
    1. first/third-person singular present indicative/subjunctive
    2. second-person singular imperative

Further reading


Galician note definition

Verb

note

  1. first/third-person singular present subjunctive of notar
    • Notar definition
      to note, make a note

Italian note definition

Pronunciation

Adjective

note

  1. feminine plural of noto
    • Noto definition
      first-person singular present indicative form of notar

Noun

note f

  1. plural of nota

Anagrams


Latin note definition

Participle

nōte

  1. vocative masculine singular of nōtus
    • Notus definition
      conditional of noti

Middle Dutch note definition

Etymology

From Old Dutch *nutu, from Proto-Germanic *hnuts.

Noun

nōte f

  1. nut (fruit)

Inflection

This noun needs an inflection-table template.

Descendants

  • Dutch: noot
  • Limburgish: noeat (with unexpected oea)

Further reading


Middle English note definition

Etymology 1

Noun

note

  1. note
    • Goeth definition
      third-person singular simple present indicative form of go
    • That definition
      Introducing a clause which is the subject or object of a verb (such as one involving reported speech), or which is a complement to a previous statement. (1 of 8 that definitions)

Etymology 2

Adverb

note

  1. Alternative form of not
    • Not definition
      Negates the meaning of the modified verb. (1 of 3 not definitions)

Norman note definition

Etymology

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Noun

note f (plural notes)

  1. (Jersey) tune

Norwegian Bokmål note definition

Etymology

From Latin nota

Noun

note m (definite singular noten, indefinite plural noter, definite plural notene)

  1. (music) a note
  2. a note in a book or text
  3. a note (communication between governments)
  4. a banknote

Derived terms

References


Norwegian Nynorsk note definition

Etymology 1

From Latin nota

Noun

note m (definite singular noten, indefinite plural notar, definite plural notane)

  1. (music) a note
  2. a note in a book or text
  3. a note (communication between governments)
  4. a banknote
Derived terms

Etymology 2

Verb

note

  1. past participle of nyta
    • Nyta definition
      to enjoy

References


Portuguese note definition

Etymology 1

Pronunciation

Noun

note m (plural notes)

  1. (computing) Clipping of notebook (notebook computer).

Etymology 2

Pronunciation

Verb

note

  1. first-person singular (eu) present subjunctive of notar
    • Eu definition
      alternative form of io
  2. third-person singular (ele and ela, also used with você and others) present subjunctive of notar
    • Ele definition
      the name of the Latin-script letter L.
    • Ela definition
      the name of the Latin-script letter L.
    • Você definition
      second-person singular personal pronoun; you (1 of 2 você definitions)
  3. third-person singular (você) affirmative imperative of notar
  4. third-person singular (você) negative imperative of notar

Romanian note definition

Pronunciation

Noun

note f pl

  1. plural of notă

Scots note definition

Alternative forms

Etymology 1

From Middle English not, note, noote, from Old English notu (use; utility; benefit), from Proto-Germanic *nutō (use; enjoyment). More at note.

Noun

note (uncountable)

  1. use; benefit
  2. necessity; occasion
  3. business; employment
  4. task; duty
  5. purpose; function; office

Etymology 2

From Middle English noten, notien, from Old English notian (to make use of; employ; enjoy), from Proto-Germanic *nutōną (to make use of; enjoy).

Verb

note (third-person singular present notes, present participle notin, past nott, past participle nott or notten)

  1. To use; employ; make use of
  2. To need

Spanish note definition

Verb

note

  1. Formal second-person singular (usted) imperative form of notar.
  2. First-person singular (yo) present subjunctive form of notar.
  3. Formal second-person singular (usted) present subjunctive form of notar.
  4. Third-person singular (él, ella, also used with usted?) present subjunctive form of notar.
    • Él definition
      he
    • Ella definition
      she

Venetian note definition

Alternative forms

Etymology

From Latin noctem, accusative of nox (compare Italian notte), from Proto-Indo-European *nókʷts.

Noun

note f (plural noti)

  1. night
    • Night definition
      The period between sunset and sunrise, when a location faces far away from the sun, thus when the sky is dark. (1 of 9 night definitions)

Yola note definition

Etymology

From Middle English noot, contraction of ne +‎ woot.

Verb

note

  1. I do not know.
    • 1867, GLOSSARY OF THE DIALECT OF FORTH AND BARGY:
      Note vidy; Ich note is; Note will wee dra aaght to-die?
      I do not know where; I ne wot; I don't know will we draw any to-day?

References

  • Jacob Poole (1867) , William Barnes, editor, A glossary, with some pieces of verse, of the old dialect of the English colony in the baronies of Forth and Bargy, County of Wexford, Ireland, J. Russell Smith, →ISBN