🤩 Discover new information from across the web

hear

Overview

This page has 15 definitions of hear in English, Cimbrian, and Western Frisian. Hear is a verb and noun. Examples of how to use hear in a sentence are shown. Also define these 18 related words and terms: perceive, ear, recognize, intentionally, listen, grant, learn, contact, try, sympathize, God, Lord, lord, Christianity, nobleman, gentleman, army, and crowd.

English

Alternative forms

Etymology

From Middle English heren, from Old English hīeran (to hear), from Proto-West Germanic *hauʀijan, from Proto-Germanic *hauzijaną (to hear), from Proto-Indo-European *h₂ḱh₂owsyéti (to be sharp-eared), from *h₂eḱ- (sharp) + *h₂ows- (ear) + *-yéti (denominative suffix).

Pronunciation

Verb

hear (third-person singular simple present hears, present participle hearing, simple past and past participle heard)

  1. (intransitive, stative) To perceive sounds through the ear. [from 10th c.]
    I was deaf, and now I can hear.
  2. (transitive, stative) To perceive (a sound, or something producing a sound) with the ear, to recognize (something) in an auditory way. [from 10th c.]
    I heard a sound from outside the window.
    • Recognize definition
      To match (something or someone which one currently perceives) to a memory of some previous encounter with the same person or thing. (1 of 8 recognize definitions)
  3. (transitive) To exercise this faculty intentionally; to listen to. [from 10th c.]
    • 1526, William Tyndale, trans. Bible, John X:
      Agayne there was dissencion amonge the iewes for these sayinges, and many of them sayd: He hath the devyll, and is madde: why heare ye hym?
    • 1935, George Goodchild, chapter 3, in Death on the Centre Court:
      It had been his intention to go to Wimbledon, but as he himself said: “Why be blooming well frizzled when you can hear all the results over the wireless. And results are all that concern me. […]”
    • Intentionally definition
      In an intentional manner; on purpose.
  4. (transitive) To listen favourably to; to grant (a request etc.). [from 10th c.]
    Eventually the king chose to hear her entreaties.
  5. (transitive) To receive information about; to come to learn of. [from 10th c.]
    • 1667, John Milton, Paradise Lost:
      Adam, soon as he heard / The fatal Trespass don by Eve, amaz'd, / Astonied stood and Blank []
  6. (with from) To be contacted by.
    • 2009, Elsa T. Aguries, The Pearl Within, →ISBN, page 141:
      When I don't hear from you, My days feel long and lonely.
    • 2012, Art Wiederhold & Charles Sutphen, From the Depths of Evil, →ISBN, page 343:
      They're ten hours overdue. Have you heard from any of them since they left Nineveh?
    • 2012, James Meredith, A Mission from God: A Memoir and Challenge for America, →ISBN:
      She left and I never heard from her again.
  7. (transitive) To listen to (a person, case) in a court of law; to try. [from 12th c.]
    Your case will be heard at the end of the month.
  8. (transitive, informal) To sympathize with; to understand the feelings or opinion of.
    You're tired of all the ads on TV? I hear ya.
    • Sympathize definition
      To have, show or express sympathy; to be affected by feelings similar to those of another, in consequence of knowing the person to be thus affected. (1 of 6 sympathize definitions)

Usage notes

Derived terms

Translations

See also

References

Anagrams


Cimbrian

Etymology

From Middle High German herre, from Old High German hērro, hēriro, comparative form of hēr (gray-haired, noble, venerable). Cognate with German Herr; see there for more.

Noun

hear m

  1. (Luserna) God, Lord
    Gott dar HearGod the Lord

References

  • “hear” in Patuzzi, Umberto, ed., (2013) Ünsarne Börtar [Our Words], Luserna, Italy: Comitato unitario delle isole linguistiche storiche germaniche in Italia / Einheitskomitee der historischen deutschen Sprachinseln in Italien

West Frisian

Pronunciation

Etymology 1

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Noun

hear c (plural hearen, diminutive hearke)

  1. lord
  2. (Christianity) the Lord, God
    Wêr de Geast fan de Hear is, der is frijheid.Wherever the Spirit of the Lord is, there is freedom.
  3. nobleman
  4. gentleman

Derived terms

Further reading

  • hear (I)”, in Wurdboek fan de Fryske taal (in Dutch), 2011

Etymology 2

From Old Frisian here, from Proto-West Germanic *hari.

Noun

hear c (plural hearen)

  1. army
    Yn âlde tiden wie Frjentsjer bilegere fan in machtich hear.In days gone by, Franeker was besieged by a mighty army.
    • Army definition
      A large, highly organized military force, concerned mainly with ground (rather than air or naval) operations. (1 of 7 army definitions)
  2. crowd

Further reading

  • hear (II)”, in Wurdboek fan de Fryske taal (in Dutch), 2011