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fee definition

Overview

This page has 23 definitions of fee with English translations in 8 languages. Fee is a noun and verb. Also define these 34 related words and terms: right, superior, land, stipend, service, fief, law, inheritable, estate, feudal, inheritance, fee simple, fee tail, property, owndom, emolument, prize, reward, payment, fairy, pixie, folklore, feeën, weave, knit, plait, braid, interlace, intertwine, mat, feeagh, fey, fe, and livestock.

See also: Fee, fée, fêe, feë, fe'e, and fɛɛ́

English fee definition

Etymology

From Middle English fee, fe, feh, feoh, from Old English feoh (cattle, property, wealth, money, payment, tribute, fee) with contamination from Old French fieu, fief (from Medieval Latin fevum, a variant of feudum (see feud), from Frankish *fehu (cattle, livestock); whence English fief), both from Proto-Germanic *fehu (cattle, sheep, livestock, owndom), from Proto-Indo-European *peḱu- (livestock). Cognate with Old High German fihu (cattle, neat), Scots fe, fie (cattle, sheep, livestock, deer, goods, property, wealth, money, wages), West Frisian fee (livestock), Dutch vee (cattle, livestock), Low German Veeh (cattle, livestock, property), Veh, German Vieh (cattle, livestock), Danish (cattle, beast, dolt), Swedish (beast, cattle, dolt), Norwegian fe (cattle), Icelandic (livestock, assets, money), Latin pecū (cattle).

Pronunciation

Noun

fee (plural fees)

  1. (feudal law) A right to the use of a superior's land, as a stipend for services to be performed; also, the land so held; a fief.
  2. (law) An inheritable estate in land held of a feudal lord on condition of the performing of certain services.
    • Estate definition
      The collective property and liabilities of someone, especially a deceased person. (1 of 12 estate definitions)
    • Feudal definition
      Of, or relating to feudalism.
  3. (law) An estate of inheritance in land, either absolute and without limitation to any particular class of heirs (fee simple) or limited to a particular class of heirs (fee tail).
    • Fee Tail definition
      An estate in land in common law wherein the land is inherited, but cannot be sold, devised by will, or otherwise alienated by the owner, but which passes by operation of law to the owner's heirs upon his death.
  4. (obsolete) Property; owndom; estate.
    • 1807, William Wordsworth, “On the Extinction of the Venetian Republic”, in Poems in Two Volumes:
      Once did she hold the gorgeous East in fee;
    • 1844, The Heritage, by James Russell Lowell
      What doth the poor man's son inherit? / Stout muscles and a sinewy heart, / A hardy frame, a hardier spirit; / King of two hands, he does his part / In every useful toil and art; / A heritage, it seems to me, / A king might wish to hold in fee.
    • 1915, W.S. Maugham, "Of Human Bondage", chapter 121:
      Cronshaw had told him that the facts of life mattered nothing to him who by the power of fancy held in fee the twin realms of space and time.
  5. (obsolete) Money paid or bestowed; payment; emolument.
  6. (obsolete) A prize or reward. Only used in the set phrase "A finder's fee" in Modern English.
    • Prize definition
      That which is taken from another; something captured; a thing seized by force, stratagem, or superior power. (1 of 7 prize definitions)
  7. A monetary payment charged for professional services.
    • 2013 July 19, Peter Wilby, “Finland spreads word on schools”, in The Guardian Weekly, volume 189, number 6, page 30:
      Imagine a country where children do nothing but play until they start compulsory schooling at age seven. Then, without exception, they attend comprehensives until the age of 16. Charging school fees is illegal, and so is sorting pupils into ability groups by streaming or setting.

Derived terms

Related terms

Translations

Verb

fee (third-person singular simple present fees, present participle feeing, simple past and past participle feed)

  1. To reward for services performed, or to be performed; to recompense; to hire or keep in hire; hence, to bribe.
    • 1693, John Dryden, “The Third Satire of Aulus Persius Flaccus”, in The Satires of Decimus Junius Juvenalis:
      In vain for Hellebore the patient cries / And fees the doctor; but too late is wise
    • c. 1606, William Shakespeare, “The Tragedie of Macbeth”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies: Published According to the True Originall Copies (First Folio), London: [] Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, OCLC 606515358, [Act III, scene iv]:
      There's not a one of them but in his house I keep a servant feed.
    • 1847, Herman Melville, Omoo
      We departed the grounds without seeing Marbonna; and previous to vaulting over the picket, feed our pretty guide, after a fashion of our own.
    • 1859, Ferna Vale, Natalie; or, A Gem Among the Sea-Weeds:
      It was at a much earlier hour than that which Mrs. Santon had named, that Delwood presented himself, and handsomely feeing the porter who answered his summons, he asked to see Miss Santon []

See also

Anagrams


Afrikaans fee definition

Etymology

From Dutch fee.

Noun

fee (plural feë, diminutive feetjie)

  1. fairy, pixie

Related terms


Dutch fee definition

Etymology

Borrowed from French fée, from Middle French [Term?], from Old French fae, from Latin fāta, from fātum.

Pronunciation

Noun

fee f (plural feeën, diminutive feetje n)

  1. (folklore) fairy

Derived terms

Descendants

  • Afrikaans: fee
  • West Frisian: fee

Luxembourgish fee definition

Verb

fee

  1. second-person singular imperative of feeën
    • Feeën definition
      Plural form of fee

Manx fee definition

Etymology 1

From Old Irish figid, from Proto-Celtic *wegyeti (to weave, compose), from Proto-Indo-European *weg- (to spin, weave). Cognate with Irish figh.

Verb

fee

  1. to weave, knit
  2. to plait, braid
  3. to interlace, intertwine
  4. to mat

Noun

fee m (genitive singular , plural )

  1. verbal noun of fee

Etymology 2

Noun

fee m

  1. genitive singular of feeagh
    • Feeagh definition
      raven; crake
  2. plural of feeagh

Mutation

Manx mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
fee ee vee
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Middle English fee definition

Noun

fee

  1. Alternative form of fey (liver)
    • Fey definition
      About to die; doomed; on the verge of sudden or violent death. (1 of 6 fey definitions)

Norwegian Nynorsk fee definition

Noun

fee n

  1. (non-standard since 1917) definite singular of fe
    • Fe definition
      religion

Romanian fee definition

Etymology

From French fée.

Noun

fee f (plural fee)

  1. fairy

Declension


West Frisian fee definition

Pronunciation

Etymology 1

From Old Frisian fia, from Proto-Germanic *fehu, from Proto-Indo-European *peḱu- (livestock).

Noun

fee n (no plural)

  1. livestock
Further reading
  • fee (II)”, in Wurdboek fan de Fryske taal (in Dutch), 2011

Etymology 2

Borrowed from Dutch fee, from French fée.

Noun

fee c (plural feeën, diminutive feeke)

  1. fairy
Further reading
  • fee (I)”, in Wurdboek fan de Fryske taal (in Dutch), 2011