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drink definition

Overview

This page has 26 definitions of drink with English translations in 11 languages. Drink is a verb and noun. Examples of how to use drink in a sentence are shown. Also define these 0 related words and terms: .

See also: Drink

English drink definition

Alternative forms

Pronunciation

Etymology 1

From Middle English drynken, from Old English drincan (to drink, swallow up, engulf), from Proto-Germanic *drinkaną (to drink), of uncertain origin; possibly from Proto-Indo-European *dʰrenǵ- (to draw into one's mouth, sip, gulp), nasalised variant of *dʰreǵ- (to draw, glide). Cognate with West Frisian drinke (to drink), Low German drinken (to drink), Dutch drinken (to drink), German trinken (to drink), Danish and Norwegian Bokmål drikke (to drink), Norwegian Nynorsk drikka (to drink).

Verb

drink (third-person singular simple present drinks, present participle drinking, simple past drank or (southern US) drunk or (nonstandard) drinked, past participle drunk or (obsolete or informal) drank or (nonstandard) drinked or (obsolete or dialectal) drunken or (obsolete or nonstandard) dranken)

  1. (transitive, intransitive) To consume (a liquid) through the mouth.
    He drank the water I gave him.
    You can lead a horse to water but you can't make him drink.
    • 1579, Immeritô [pseudonym; Edmund Spenser], “Nouember. Aegloga Vndecima.”, in The Shepheardes Calender: [], London: [] Hugh Singleton, [], OCLC 606515406; republished as The Shepheardes Calender [], London: [] Iohn Wolfe for Iohn Harrison the yonger, [], 1586, OCLC 837880809, folio 47, recto:
      [] There liues ſhee with the bleſſed Gods in bliſſe: / There drinks the Nectar with Ambroſia mixt []
    • c. 1859, William Makepeace Thackeray, The Virginians, volume 1, page 341:
      It was he who proposed the bowl of punch, which was brewed and drunk in Mrs. Betty’s room, and which Gumbo concocted with exquisite skill.
    • 1918, W. B. Maxwell, chapter 2, in The Mirror and the Lamp[1]:
      That the young Mr. Churchills liked—but they did not like him coming round of an evening and drinking weak whisky-and-water while he held forth on railway debentures and corporation loans. Mr. Barrett, however, by fawning and flattery, seemed to be able to make not only Mrs. Churchill but everyone else do what he desired.
  2. (transitive, metonymically) To consume the liquid contained within (a bottle, glass, etc.).
    Jack drank the whole bottle by himself.
  3. (intransitive) To consume alcoholic beverages.
    You've been drinking, haven't you?
    No thanks, I don't drink.
    Everyone who is drinking is drinking, but not everyone who is drinking is drinking.
  4. (transitive) To take in (a liquid), in any manner; to suck up; to absorb; to imbibe.
    • 1697, “(please specify the book number)”, in John Dryden, transl., The Works of Virgil: Containing His Pastorals, Georgics, and Æneis. [], London: [] Jacob Tonson, [], OCLC 403869432:
      , IV
      Let the purple violets drink the stream.
  5. (transitive) To take in; to receive within one, through the senses; to inhale; to hear; to see.
  6. (transitive, obsolete) To smoke, as tobacco.
    • 1630, John Taylor, A Proclomation or approbation from the King of execration, to euery nation, for Tobaccoes propogration
      And some men now live ninety yeeres and past, / Who never dranke tobacco first nor last.
Synonyms
Derived terms
Related terms
Descendants
Translations
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Dictionary:Entry layout § Translations.

Etymology 2

From Middle English drink, drinke (also as drinche, drunch), from Old English drynċ, from Proto-Germanic *drunkiz, *drankiz. Compare Dutch drank.

Noun

drink (countable and uncountable, plural drinks)

  1. A beverage.
    I’d like another drink please.
  2. (uncountable, archaic) Drinks in general; something to drink
  3. A type of beverage (usually mixed).
    My favourite drink is the White Russian.
  4. A (served) alcoholic beverage.
    Can I buy you a drink?
  5. The action of drinking, especially with the verbs take or have.
    He was about to take a drink from his root beer.
  6. Alcoholic beverages in general.
    • 1935, George Goodchild, chapter 1, in Death on the Centre Court:
      She mixed furniture with the same fatal profligacy as she mixed drinks, and this outrageous contact between things which were intended by Nature to be kept poles apart gave her an inexpressible thrill.
    • 2014 November 14, Blake Bailey, “'Tennessee Williams,' by John Lahr [print version: Theatrical victory of art over life, International New York Times, 18 November 2014, p. 13]”, in The New York Times[2]:
      [] she was indeed Amanda in the flesh: a doughty chatterbox from Ohio who adopted the manner of a Southern belle and eschewed both drink and sex to the greatest extent possible.
  7. (colloquial, with the) Any body of water.
    If he doesn't pay off the mafia, he’ll wear cement shoes to the bottom of the drink!
    • 1996, John French, A Drop in the Ocean: Dramatic Accounts of Aircrew Saved From the Sea, Pen and Sword, →ISBN, page 99:
      When in mid-Channel the speed slowed and I was informed by A.C. Russell that another dinghy had been spotted. This turned out to contain a Canadian fighter pilot who had been in the drink for three days and was in rather a bad way. He said he had seen all the aircraft flying over in the two days before D-Day and since, but no one had sighted him.
    • 2011, Levi Johnston, Deer in the Headlights: My Life in Sarah Palin's Crosshairs, Simon and Schuster, →ISBN, page 34:
      In seconds, we went from sitting in a boat to threading ice-cold water. I wasn't wearing a life jacket and am not the best paddler, but there I was, in the drink, splashing around.
    • 2012, Jack R. Myers, Shot at and Missed: Recollections of a World War II Bombardier, University of Oklahoma Press, →ISBN, page 31:
      If the planes couldn't make it, they would go in the drink, eject their rubber lifeboats, inflate them, climb in, and pray for the Navy to pick them up before the Germans did.
Usage notes
  • A plainer term than more elevated term beverage. Beverage is of French origin, while drink is of Old English origin, and this stylistic difference by origin is common; see list of English words with dual French and Anglo-Saxon variations.
  • In the sense of any body of water the term is often associated with (a threat of) drowning.
Synonyms
Derived terms
Descendants
Translations
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Dictionary:Entry layout § Translations.

Afrikaans drink definition

Etymology

From Dutch drinken, from Middle Dutch drinken, from Old Dutch drinkan, from Proto-Germanic *drinkaną.

Verb

drink (present drink, present participle drinkende, past participle gedrink)

  1. to drink

Czech drink definition

Etymology

From English drink.

Pronunciation

Noun

drink m inan

  1. drink (a (mixed) alcoholic beverage)

Declension

Further reading

  • drink in Příruční slovník jazyka českého, 1935–1957
  • drink in Slovník spisovného jazyka českého, 1960–1971, 1989

Danish drink definition

Etymology

From English drink.

Noun

drink c (singular definite drinken, plural indefinite drinks)

  1. drink; a (mixed) alcoholic beverage

Inflection

Synonyms

  • sjus c

Further reading


Dutch drink definition

Pronunciation

Etymology 1

Borrowed from English drink.

Noun

drink m (plural drinks)

  1. (Belgium) A social event were beverages are served, with or without snacks, e.g. as a celebration.
  2. (Netherlands) A beverage, a drink.

Etymology 2

See the etymology of the main entry.

Verb

drink

  1. first-person singular present indicative of drinken
  2. imperative of drinken

French drink definition

Etymology

Borrowed from English drink.

Pronunciation

Noun

drink m (plural drinks)

  1. a reception or afterparty where alcohol is served

Further reading


Italian drink definition

Etymology

From English drink.

Noun

drink m (invariable)

  1. drink (served beverage and mixed beverage)
    Synonym: bevanda
    • 2013, Paolo Sorrentino, La grande bellezza, spoken by Jep Gambardella (Toni Servillo), 01:39:42 from the start:
      Io berrò molti drink, ma non così tanti da diventare molesto.
      I'll drink many drinks, but not so many to become annoying.

Further reading


Low German drink definition

Verb

drink

  1. first-person singular of drinken

Polish drink definition

Etymology

From English drink.

Pronunciation

Noun

drink m inan

  1. cocktail (served alcoholic beverage)

Declension

Derived terms

  • (verb) drinkować

Further reading

  • drink in Wielki słownik języka polskiego, Instytut Języka Polskiego PAN
  • drink in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Portuguese drink definition

Noun

drink m (plural drinks)

  1. Alternative form of drinque

Swedish drink definition

Etymology

From English drink

Pronunciation

Noun

drink c

  1. drink; a (mixed) alcoholic beverage

Declension

Declension of drink 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative drink drinken drinkar drinkarna
Genitive drinks drinkens drinkars drinkarnas

Related terms

  • drinkare