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bark definition

Overview

This page has 34 definitions of bark with English translations in 8 languages. Bark is a verb and noun. Examples of how to use bark in a sentence are shown. Also define these 51 related words and terms: explosive, noise, give tongue, clamor, importunate, outcry, speak, sharp, sound, dog, fox, abrupt, vocal, utterance, tree, Indian, mixed race, cascarillero, cascador, cáscara, medicine, Peruvian bark, Jesuit's bark, cinchona, quinine, candy, crust, barbecue, meat, rub, strip, peel, abrade, girdle, cover, inclose, sail, vessel, pinnace, smack, poetic, nautical, anatomy, belly, bark, tannin, barge, leatherworking, barque, shoulder, and barka.

See also: Bark

English bark definition

Pronunciation

Etymology 1

From Middle English barken, berken, borken, from Old English beorcan (to bark), from the Proto-Germanic *berkaną (to bark, rumble), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰereg- (to make a noise, growl, bark), from *bʰer- (to drone, hum, buzz). Cognate with Icelandic berkja (to bark, bluster), Icelandic barki (throat, windpipe), dialectal Lithuanian burgė́ti (to growl, grumble, grouch, quarrel), Serbo-Croatian brbljati (to murmur). For the noun, compare Old English beorc, bearce (barking).

Verb

bark (third-person singular simple present barks, present participle barking, simple past and past participle barked)

  1. (intransitive) To make a short, loud, explosive noise with the vocal organs (said of animals, especially dogs).
    Synonym: give tongue
    The neighbour's dog is always barking.
    The seal barked as the zookeeper threw fish into its enclosure.
  2. (intransitive) To make a clamor; to make importunate outcries.
    • 1530, Tyndale, A Pathway into the Holy Scripture:
      And therefore they bark, and say the scripture maketh heretics.
    • 1655, Thomas Fuller, James Nichols, editor, The Church History of Britain, [], volume (please specify |volume=I to III), new edition, London: [] [James Nichols] for Thomas Tegg and Son, [], published 1837, OCLC 913056315:
      Where there is the barking of the belly, there no other commands will be heard, much less obeyed.
  3. (transitive) To speak sharply.
    The sergeant barked an order.
    • 1932, Delos W. Lovelace, King Kong, published 1965, page 3:
      Plainly he was prepared to bark out an interminable succession of charges against the Wanderer.
    • 2011 January 5, Mark Ashenden, “Wolverhampton 1 - 0 Chelsea”, in BBC[1]:
      While McCarthy prowled the touchline barking orders, his opposite number watched on motionless and expressionless and, with 25 minutes to go, decided to throw on Nicolas Anelka for Kalou.
Synonyms
Derived terms
Terms derived from bark verb
 
Translations
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Dictionary:Entry layout § Translations.

Noun

bark (plural barks)

  1. The short, loud, explosive sound uttered by a dog, a fox, and some other animals.
  2. (figuratively) An abrupt loud vocal utterance.
    • c. 1921,, The Cambridge History of English and American Literature, volume 11:
      Fox’s clumsy figure, negligently dressed in blue and buff, seemed unprepossessing; only his shaggy eyebrows added to the expression of his face; his voice would rise to a bark in excitement.
Translations

Etymology 2

From Middle English bark, from Old English barc (bark), from Old Norse bǫrkr (tree bark), from Proto-Germanic *barkuz, probably related to *birkijǭ (birch), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰergo- (compare Latin frāxinus (ash), Lithuanian béržas (birch)), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰereg- (to gleam; white) (compare English bright); akin to Danish bark, Icelandic börkur, Low German borke and Albanian berk (bast).

Noun

bark (countable and uncountable, plural barks)

  1. (countable, uncountable) The exterior covering of the trunk and branches of a tree.
    • 1879, Friedrich August Flückiger & al., Pharmacographia...[2], page 346:
      The hardships of bark-collecting in the primeval forests of South America are of the severest kind, and undergone only by the half-civilized Indians and people of mixed race, in the pay of speculators or companies located in the towns. Those who are engaged in the business, especially the collectors themselves, are called Cascarilleros or Cascadores, from the Spanish word Cascara, bark.
    • 2012, John Branch, “Snow Fall : The Avalanche at Tunnel Creek”, in New York Time[3]:
      Moving about 70 miles per hour, it crashed through the sturdy old-growth trees, snapping their limbs and shredding bark from their trunks.
    • Tree definition
      A perennial woody plant, not exactly defined, but differentiated from a shrub by its larger size (typically over a few meters in height) or growth habit, usually having a single (or few) main axis or trunk unbranched for some distance above the ground and a head of branches and foliage. (1 of 16 tree definitions)
    • Mixed Race definition
      Alternative spelling of mixed-race
    • Cascarillero definition
      a "barker": a person who strips needed or valuable bark from trees, as on a cinchona plantation
    • Cascador definition
      stunt actor
  2. (medicine) Peruvian bark or Jesuit's bark, the bark of the cinchona from which quinine is produced.
    • Peruvian Bark definition
      Cinchona bark, chiefly as used in medicine.
  3. Hard candy made in flat sheets, for instance out of chocolate, peanut butter, toffee or peppermint.
  4. The crust formed on barbecued meat that has had a rub applied to it.
    • 2009, Julie Reinhardt, She-Smoke: A Backyard Barbecue Book, page 151:
      This softens the meat further, but at some loss of crunch to the bark.
  5. The envelopment or outer covering of anything.
Usage notes

Usually uncountable; bark may be countable when referring to the barks of different types of tree.

Synonyms
  • (exterior covering of a tree): rind
Derived terms
Translations

Verb

bark (third-person singular simple present barks, present participle barking, simple past and past participle barked)

  1. To strip the bark from; to peel.
    • 1922, A. M. Chisholm, A Thousand a Plate:
      Along the river freshly felled and barked trees told of the activity of beaver, and in slow current and in eddies the tops of their winter's food supply lay like submerged brush fences projecting above the surface.
    • Peel definition
      To remove the skin or outer covering of. (1 of 5 peel definitions)
  2. To abrade or rub off any outer covering from.
    to bark one’s heel
    • 2019 May 8, Barney Ronay, “Liverpool’s waves of red fury and recklessness end in joyous bedlam”, in The Guardian[4]:
      Barcelona had been harried and hurried and stretched thin by the midway point in the second half. Tackles flew in. Toes were crushed, shins barked, ankles hacked.
  3. To girdle.
  4. To cover or inclose with bark, or as with bark.
    bark the roof of a hut
    • Inclose definition
      Alternative form of enclose
Derived terms
Translations

Etymology 3

From Middle English barke (boat), from Middle French barque, from Late Latin barca, from Vulgar Latin barica, from Ancient Greek βάρις (báris, Egyptian boat), from Coptic ⲃⲁⲁⲣⲉ (baare, small boat), from Egyptian bꜣjr (transport ship, type of fish),


Doublet of barge and barque.

Alternative forms

Noun

bark (plural barks)

  1. (obsolete) A small sailing vessel, e.g. a pinnace or a fishing smack; a rowing boat or barge.
    • Sail definition
      A piece of fabric attached to a boat and arranged such that it causes the wind to drive the boat along. The sail may be attached to the boat via a combination of mast, spars and ropes. (1 of 12 sail definitions)
    • Pinnace definition
      A light boat, traditionally propelled by sails, but sometimes a rowboat. Pinnaces are usually messenger boats, carrying messages among the larger ships of a fleet.
  2. (poetic) A sailing vessel or boat of any kind.
  3. (nautical) A vessel, typically with three (or more) masts, with the foremasts (or fore- and mainmasts) square-rigged, and mizzenmast schooner-rigged.
Translations

Anagrams


Albanian bark definition

Etymology

From Proto-Albanian *báruka, from Proto-Indo-European *bʰor-uko-, from *bʰer- (to carry). Compare Illyrian *βαρυκα. A doublet of bie, barrë, and barrë.

Noun

bark m (indefinite plural barqe, definite singular barku, definite plural barqet)

  1. (anatomy) belly

Declension

Derived terms


Danish bark definition

Etymology 1

From Old Norse bǫrkr.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /bark/, [b̥ɑːɡ̊]

Noun

bark c (singular definite barken, not used in plural form)

  1. bark (covering of the trunk of a tree)

Derived terms

  • afbarke
  • afbarkning
  • barkborer
  • barkbrun
  • barkbrød
  • barkfarve
  • barkslag
  • barkstykke
 

Etymology 2

From Old Norse barki

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /bark/, [b̥ɑːɡ̊]

Noun

bark c (singular definite barken, plural indefinite barker)

  1. bark (large sailing boat)
Inflection

References


Dutch bark definition

Pronunciation

Etymology 1

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Noun

bark m (plural barken, diminutive barkje n)

  1. the bark of certain trees, used for its tannin

Etymology 2

From Middle Dutch barke, from Old French barque.

Noun

bark f (plural barken, diminutive barkje n)

  1. barge, a large type of rowing or sailing boat

Anagrams


Faroese bark definition

Etymology

From Danish bark, from Middle French barque, from Late Latin barca, from Vulgar Latin barica, from Ancient Greek βάρις (báris, Egyptian boat), from Coptic ⲃⲁⲁⲣⲉ (baare, small boat), from Egyptian bꜣjr (transport ship, type of fish),


Noun

bark f (genitive singular barkar, plural barkir)

  1. (nautical) bark: A three-masted vessel, having her foremast and mainmast square-rigged, and her mizzenmast schooner-rigged.

Declension

Declension of bark
f2 singular plural
indefinite definite indefinite definite
nominative bark barkin barkir barkirnar
accusative bark barkina barkir barkirnar
dative bark barkini barkum barkunum
genitive barkar barkarinnar barka barkanna

Synonyms

  • barkskip

Middle English bark definition

Alternative forms

Etymology

From Old English bark, from Old Norse bǫrkr, from Proto-Germanic *barkuz.

Pronunciation

Noun

bark (plural barkes)

  1. bark (a tree's covering, often used in leatherworking or as a pharmaceutical).
  2. The exterior layer of a nut or other fruit.
  3. (rare, Late Middle English, figuratively) A shallow look at something.

Derived terms

Descendants

References


Norwegian Bokmål bark definition

Etymology 1

From Old Norse bǫrkr

Noun

bark m (definite singular barken, uncountable)

  1. bark (outer layer of trunks and branches of trees and bushes)

Derived terms

See also

Etymology 2

From Late Latin barca, via French barque

Noun

bark m (definite singular barken, indefinite plural barker, definite plural barkene)

  1. (nautical) a barque or bark (type of sailing ship)

References


Norwegian Nynorsk bark definition

Etymology

From Late Latin barca, via French barque

Noun

bark m (definite singular barken, indefinite plural barkar, definite plural barkane)

  1. (nautical) a barque or bark (type of sailing ship)

References


Polish bark definition

Pronunciation

Etymology 1

From Proto-Slavic *bъrkъ.

Noun

bark m inan

  1. shoulder
    • Shoulder definition
      The part of an animal's body between the base of the neck and forearm socket.
      1. The part of the human torso forming a relatively horizontal surface running away from the neck. (1 of 20 shoulder definitions)
Declension

Etymology 2

From Latin barca.

Noun

bark m inan

  1. barque (sailing vessel)
Declension

Etymology 3

Noun

bark m inan

  1. unit in the Bark scale

Further reading


Swedish bark definition

Etymology

From Old Norse bǫrkr, from Proto-Germanic *barkuz.

Noun

bark c (uncountable)

  1. bark (covering of the trunk of a tree)
    Hyponym: barka
    • Barka definition
      catkin, ament
  2. barque (type of ship)
    Synonym: barkskepp

Declension

Declension of bark 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative bark barken barkar barkarna
Genitive barks barkens barkars barkarnas