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aver

Overview

This page has 23 definitions of aver with English translations in 10 languages. Aver is a verb and noun. Examples of how to use aver in a sentence are shown. Also define these 42 related words and terms: transitive, intransitive, assert, truth, affirm, confidence, declare, positive, manner, ubicumque, law, justify, prove, allegation, plea, make, avouch, verify, existence, happening, offer, beast of burden, workhorse, working, ox, animal, old, useless, horse, nag, avè, avere, have, belongings, possessions, property, wealth, possess, avoir, exist, haver, and haber.

See also: avêr, avër, and a ver

English

Etymology 1

From Middle English averren (to corroborate (a statement); to cite (something) as corroboration or proof; (law) to prove (something) in court; to declare (something) under oath as true; to prove (a case) by a jury’s oaths) [and other forms],[1] from Old French avérer (modern French avérer (to reveal, uncover; to prove (to be), transpire)), from Late Latin *advērāre (to make true; to prove to be true; to verify), the present active infinitive of Late Latin *advērō (to make true; to prove to be true), from Latin ad- (prefix forming factitive verbs meaning ‘to make (something) have the properties of [the adjective or noun to which it is attached]’) + vērus (actual, real, true; genuine; proper, suitable; just, right) (ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *weh₁- (true)) + (suffix forming regular first-conjugation verbs).[2]

Pronunciation

Verb

aver (third-person singular simple present avers, present participle averring or (obsolete) avering, simple past and past participle averred or (obsolete) avered)

  1. (transitive, intransitive) To assert the truth of (something); to affirm (something) with confidence; to declare (something) in a positive manner.
    • 1624, Democritus Junior [pseudonym; Robert Burton], “Causes of Heroicall Loue, Temperature, Full Diet, Idlenesse, Place, Climat, &c.”, in The Anatomy of Melancholy: [], 2nd edition, Oxford, Oxfordshire: Printed by John Lichfield and James Short, for Henry Cripps, OCLC 54573970, partition 3, section 2, member 2, subsection 1, page 209:
      A rare thing to ſee a yong man or woman, that liues idlely, and fares well, of what condition ſoeuer, not to bee in loue. Vbicumqꝫ ſecuritas, ibi libido dominatur, luſt & ſecurity domineere together, as St Hierome auerreth.
    • 1660, Samuel Fisher, “[Rusticus ad Academicos in Exercitationibus Expostulatoriis, Apologeticis Quatuor. The Rustick’s Alarm to the Rabbies: Or, The Country Correcting the University and Clergy, and (Not without Good Cause) Contesting for the Truth, against the Nursing Mothers and Their Children. In Four Apologetical and Expostulatory Exercitations; [...]] The Third Apologetical, and Expostulatory Exercitation”, in The Testimony of Truth Exalted, [], [London?: s.n.], published 1679, OCLC 8951836, chapter I, page 411:
      Now as to the Scriptures being the Word of God, and evidently known to be ſo, or evidencing themſelves to be ſo, and that of right, and properly they are to be ſo called; all which thou J. O. very abſolutely averreſt, []
    • 1662, [Samuel Butler], “[The First Part of Hudibras]”, in Hudibras. The First and Second Parts. [], London: [] John Martyn and Henry Herringman, [], published 1678, OCLC 890163163; republished in A[lfred] R[ayney] Waller, editor, Hudibras: Written in the Time of the Late Wars, Cambridge: At the University Press, 1905, OCLC 963614346, canto II, page 31:
      Chiron, the four-legg'd Bard, had both / A Beard and Tail of his own growth; / And yet by Authors 'tis averr'd, / He made use onely of his Beard.
    • 1701, Lawrence Smith, “[First Discourse on 2 Timothy 1:10]”, in The Evidence of Things Not Seen: Or, The Immortality of the Human Soul, and the Separate Condition thereof in the Other World, Asserted and Made Manifest: [], London: [] Thomas Speed, [], OCLC 836797111, page 1:
      [T]he partial Infidel [] averreth the Sleep or Inſenſibility of the Soul both in good and bad perſons, from the time of their Deceaſe hence until their Reſurrection; []
    • 1819, Percy Bysshe Shelley, “Peter Bell the Third”, in [Mary] Shelley, editor, The Poetical Works of Percy Bysshe Shelley. [], new edition, London: Edward Moxon [], published 1840, OCLC 1152757693, part the second (The Devil), stanza 1, page 239:
      The Devil, I safely can aver, / Has neither hoof, nor tail, nor sting; / Nor is he, as some sages swear, / A spirit, neither here nor there, / In nothing—yet in everything.
    • 1851 November 14, Herman Melville, “Cetology”, in Moby-Dick; or, The Whale, 1st American edition, New York, N.Y.: Harper & Brothers; London: Richard Bentley, OCLC 57395299, page 156:
      An Irish author avers that the Earl of Leicester, on bended knees, did likewise present to her highness another horn, pertaining to a land beast of the unicorn nature.
    • 1939 August 25, Yip Harburg (lyrics), Harold Arlen (music), “Ding-Dong! The Witch Is Dead”, in The Wizard of Oz (soundtrack), Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer:
      As Coroner, I must aver, I thoroughly examined her. / And she's not only merely dead, she's really most sincerely dead.
    • 1997, Frederick W. Case, Jr.; Roberta B. Case, “The North American Trilliums”, in Trilliums, Portland, Or.: Timber Press, →ISBN, page 109:
      Horticulturalist Richard Lighty has a form [of Trillium grandiflorum] that he avers to open almost a cerise-red.
    • 2007 July 26, European Court of Human Rights (Fifth Section), Peev v. Bulgaria (Application no. 64209/01)‎[1], Strasbourg, paragraph 19:
      In the meantime, on 5 June 2000, the applicant had brought a civil action against the Prosecutor's Office. He alleged that the termination of his contract had been unlawful and sought reinstatement and compensation for loss of salary. He averred, inter alia, that the climate in the Supreme Cassation Prosecutor's Office had deteriorated as a result of the actions of the Chief Prosecutor.
    • 2019 April 14, Alex McLevy, “Winter is Here on Game of Thrones’ Final Season Premiere (Newbies)”, in The A.V. Club[2], archived from the original on 18 December 2020:
      [W]hen Yara tells him he picked the losing side, he avers that he might just as soon head back to the Iron Islands—"But first, I'm gonna fuck the queen" [...]
    • Truth definition
      True facts, genuine depiction or statements of reality. (1 of 9 truth definitions)
    • Ubicumque definition
      wherever, wheresoever, in whatever place; in any place
  2. (transitive, intransitive, law) To justify or prove (an allegation or plea that one has made).
  3. (transitive, obsolete) To avouch, prove, or verify the existence or happening of (something), or to offer to do so.
    • 1611 April (first recorded performance), William Shakespeare, “The Tragedie of Cymbeline”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies: Published According to the True Originall Copies (First Folio), London: [] Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, OCLC 606515358, [Act V, scene v], page 396, column 2:
      [] I return'd with ſimular proofe enough, / To make the Noble Leonatus mad, / By wounding his beleefe in her Renowne, / With tokens thus, and thus: auerring notes / Of Chamber-hanging, Pictures, this her Bracelet / (Oh cunning how I got) nay ſome markes / Of ſecret on her perſon, that he could not / But thinke her bond of Chaſtity quite crack'd, / I hauing tane the forfeyt.
    • 1641 May, John Milton, Of Reformation Touching Church-Discipline in England: And the Cavvses that hitherto have Hindred it; republished as Will Taliaferro Hale, editor, Of Reformation Touching Church-Discipline in England (Yale Studies in English; LIV), New Haven, Conn.: Yale University Press, 1916, OCLC 260112239, 2nd book:
      Upon a time the Body summon'd all the Members to meet in the Guild for the common good (as Aesops Chronicles averre many stranger Accidents) the head by right takes the first seat, and next to it a huge and monstrous Wen little lesse than the Head it selfe, growing to it by a narrower excrescency.
    • 1841 December, R[ichard] R[obert] Madden, “Address on Slavery in Cuba, Presented to the General Anti-slavery Convention”, in The Churchman’s Monthly Review, London: R. B. Seeley and W. Burnside; and sold by L. and G. Seeley, [], OCLC 863447718, page 705:
      [A]lthough thou averrest this, and averrest it truly, we are nevertheless constrained to plead guilty to the possession of so much of this sensibility [a refusal to hear details] (call it "sickly" if thou wilt) as that they case once proved, our feeling of duty refuses to sustain us any longer against that combined and overwhelming influence of shattered nerves and a sickened heart.
Conjugation
Derived terms
Related terms
Translations

Etymology 2

From Middle English aver, avere (workhorse; any beast of burden (?); things which are owned, possessions, property, wealth; state of being rich, wealth; ownership, possession) [and other forms],[3][4] and then either:

Pronunciation

Noun

aver (plural avers)

  1. (Britain, dialectal, archaic) A beast of burden; chiefly a workhorse, but also a working ox or other animal.
  2. (Northern England, Scotland, dialectal, archaic) An old, useless horse; a nag.
    • Old definition
      Of an object, concept, relationship, etc., having existed for a relatively long period of time. (1 of 15 old definitions)

References

  1. ^ averren, v.”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007.
  2. ^ Compare “aver, v.”, in OED Online , Oxford, Oxfordshire: Oxford University Press, March 2021; “aver, v.”, in Lexico, Dictionary.com; Oxford University Press, 2019–present.
  3. 3.0 3.1 āver, n.(1)”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007.
  4. ^ avēr, n.(2)”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007.
  5. ^ aver, n.”, in OED Online , Oxford, Oxfordshire: Oxford University Press, March 2021.

Anagrams


Corsican

Verb

aver

  1. Alternative form of avè
    • Avè definition
      to have

Italian

Alternative forms

  • haver (obsolete spelling)

Verb

aver

  1. Apocopic form of avere
    • Avere definition
      first-person singular present subjunctive of averar (1 of 2 avere definitions)

Anagrams


Ladino

Etymology

From Old Spanish aver, from Latin habeō (hold, have).

Verb

aver (Latin spelling, Hebrew spelling אביר‎)

  1. to have

Middle English

Etymology

From Old French aver, aveir, avoir (possession, property; (collectively) beasts of burden; domestic animals; cattle) (modern French avoir (asset, possession)), from aveir, avoir (to have), from Latin habēre,[1] the present active infinitive of habeō (to have, hold; to have, own (possessions)), from Proto-Indo-European *gʰeh₁bʰ-, *ǵʰeh₁bʰ- (to grab, take).

Noun

aver (plural avers)

  1. Belongings, possessions, property, wealth.
    • Wealth definition
      Riches; a great amount of valuable assets or material possessions. (1 of 3 wealth definitions)

References

  1. ^ avēr, n.(2)”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007.

Norman

Alternative forms

Etymology

From Old French aveir, from Latin habeō (have, hold, possess).

Verb

aver

  1. (Jersey, alternative form in Guernsey) to have

Conjugation