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accident

Overview

This page has 30 definitions of accident with English translations in 8 languages. Accident is a noun and verb. Examples of how to use accident in a sentence are shown. Also define these 53 related words and terms: unexpected, event, negative, consequences, intention, suffering, transport, vehicle, damage, death, chance, fact, relation, nonessential, incontinence, pregnancy, philosophy, logic, distinction, substance, sweetness, softness, grammar, property, essential, gender, number, case, geology, heraldry, point, mark, retained, omitted, coat of arms, law, casus, unforeseen, extraordinary, extraneous, interference, calculation, appearance, manifestation, accident, music, accidental, geography, feature, theology, accido, symptom, and coincidental.

See also: Accident

English

A car after an accident (unintended event causing damage).

Etymology

Pronunciation

  • (US) IPA(key): /ˈæk.sə.dənt/, /ˈæk.sə.dɛnt/
  • (file)

Noun

accident (countable and uncountable, plural accidents)

  1. An unexpected event with negative consequences occurring without the intention of the one suffering the consequences.
    to die by an accident
    • Intention definition
      The goal or purpose behind a specific action or set of actions. (1 of 6 intention definitions)
    • Suffering definition
      Experiencing pain.
  2. (transport, vehicles) Especially, a collision or similar unintended event that causes damage or death.
    There was a huge accident on I5 involving 15 automobiles.
    My insurance went up after the second accident in three months.
    • 2013 July-August, Philip J. Bushnell, “Solvents, Ethanol, Car Crashes & Tolerance”, in American Scientist:
      Surprisingly, this analysis revealed that acute exposure to solvent vapors at concentrations below those associated with long-term effects appears to increase the risk of a fatal automobile accident. Furthermore, this increase in risk is comparable to the risk of death from leukemia after long-term exposure to benzene, another solvent, which has the well-known property of causing this type of cancer.
  3. Any chance event.
  4. (uncountable) Chance.
    • c.1861-1863, Richard Chevenix Trench, in 1888, Letters and memorials, Volume 1,
      Thou cam'st not to thy place by accident, / It is the very place God meant for thee; []
    • 1991 Autumn, Robert M. Adams, “Montaigne”, in American Scholar, volume 60, number 4, page 589:
      And so with his writing, which he proudly said was a perfect counterpart of his life. Accident played a major part in both.
  5. Any property, fact, or relation that is the result of chance or is nonessential.
    • 1883, J. P. Mahaffy, Social life in Greece from Homer to Menander,
      This accident, as I call it, of Athens being situated some miles from the sea, which is rather the consequence of its being a very ancient site, []
    Beauty is an accident.
    • Fact definition
      Something actual as opposed to invented. (1 of 9 fact definitions)
  6. (euphemistic) An instance of incontinence.
    • 2009, Marcia Stedron, My Roller Coaster Life as an Army Wife, Xlibris Corporation, →ISBN, page 56:
      We weren’t there long when Karin asked about our dog. When we told her Chris was in the car, she insisted we bring him up to the apartment. I rejected her offer and said he might have an accident on the carpet and I didn’t want to worry about it.
  7. (euphemistic) An unintended pregnancy.
  8. (philosophy, logic) A quality or attribute in distinction from the substance, as sweetness, softness.
    • 1902, William James, The Varieties of Religious Experience, Folio Society 2008, page 171:
      If they went through their growth-crisis in other faiths and other countries, although the essence of the change would be the same [] , its accidents would be different.
  9. (grammar) A property attached to a word, but not essential to it, such as gender, number, or case.
    • a 1799, John Parkhurst, A Hebrew and English lexicon without points, page 25
      An adjective, so called because adjectitious, or added to a substantive, denotes some quality or accident of the substantive to which it is joined []
  10. (geology) An irregular surface feature with no apparent cause.
    • Geology definition
      The science that studies the structure of the earth (or other planets), together with its origin and development, especially by examination of its rocks. (1 of 2 geology definitions)
  11. (geology) A sudden discontinuity of ground such as fault of great thickness, bed or lentil of unstable ground.[1]
  12. (heraldry) A point or mark which may be retained or omitted in a coat of arms.
    • Mark definition
      Boundary, land within a boundary.
      1. A boundary; a border or frontier.
      2. A boundary-post or fence.
      3. A stone or post used to indicate position and guide travellers.
      4. A type of small region or principality.
      5. A common, or area of common land, especially among early Germanic peoples.
      (1 of 35 mark definitions)
    • Retained definition
      simple past tense and past participle of retain
    • Omitted definition
      simple past tense and past participle of omit
  13. (law) casus; such unforeseen, extraordinary, extraneous interference as is out of the range of ordinary calculation.
    • Casus definition
      spy
  14. (uncountable, philosophy, uncommon) Appearance, manifestation.
    • 14thC, Geoffrey Chaucer, The Pardoner's Prologue and Tale in The Canterbury Tales,
      These cookes how they stamp, and strain, and grind, / And turne substance into accident, / To fulfill all thy likerous talent!
    • 1677, Heraclitus Christianus: or, the Man of Sorrow, chapter 3, page 14:
      But as to Man, all the Fruits of the Earth, all sorts of Herbs, Plants and Roots, the Fishes of the Sea, and the Birds of the Air do not suffice him, but he must disguise, vary, and sophisticate, change the substance into accident, that by such irritations as these, Nature might be provoked, and as it were necessitated.
    • 1989, Iysa A. Bello, The medieval Islamic controversy between philosophy and orthodoxy, page 55:
      Nonetheless, those who have no evidence of the impossibility of the transformation of accident into substance believe that it is death itself which will be actually transformed into a ram on the Day of Resurrection and then be slaughtered.
    • 2005, Muhammad Ali Khalidi, Medieval Islamic philosophical writings, page 175:
      It would also follow that God ought to be able to transmute genera, converting substance into accident, knowledge into ability, black into white, and sound into smell, just as he can turn the inanimate into animate []
    • 2010, T. M. Rudavsky, Maimonides, page 142:
      nor can God effect the transmutation of substances (from accident into substance, or substance into accident, or substance without accident).

Synonyms

Derived terms

Related terms

Translations

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Dictionary:Entry layout § Translations.

References

  • Elisabetta Lonati, "Allas, the shorte throte, the tendre mouth": the sins of the mouth in The Canterbury Tales, in Thou sittest at another boke, volume 3 (2008, ISSN 1974-0603), page 253: "the cooks "turnen substance into accident" (Pd 539), transform the raw material, its natural essence, into the outward aspect by which it is known."
  • Barbara Fass Leavy, To Blight With Plague: Studies in a Literary Theme (1993), page 47:
    To turn substance into accident is to give external form to what previously was unformed, to transform spirit into matter, to reduce eternal truths to their ephemeral physical manifestations.
  1. ^ “geological accident - accident géologique”, in Dictionary of Civil Engineering: English-French (EngineeringPro), Springer Science & Business Media, 2007-05-08, DOI:10.1007/b104633, →ISBN, page 573: “A sudden discontinuity of ground such as fault of great thickness, bed or lentil of unstable ground, etc.”

Further reading


Catalan

Etymology

From Latin accidēns, present active participle of accidō (happen).

Pronunciation

Noun

accident m (plural accidents)

  1. accident (a chance occurrence)
  2. (grammar) accident
  3. (music) accidental
  4. (logic) accident
  5. (transport) accident
  6. (geography) feature

Derived terms

Related terms

Further reading


Dutch

Etymology

From Middle Dutch accident, from Middle French accident.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˌɑk.siˈdɛnt/
  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: ac‧ci‧dent
  • Rhymes: -ɛnt

Noun

accident n (plural accidenten, diminutive accidentje n)

  1. (philosophy, theology) accidental property
  2. (now Belgium) accident

French

Pronunciation

Noun

accident m (plural accidents)

  1. accident

Derived terms

Further reading


Latin

Etymology 1

Form of the verb accidō (I fall down upon).

Verb

accident

  1. third-person plural future active indicative of accidō
    • Accido definition
      first-person singular present indicative of accidere

Etymology 2

Form of the verb accīdō (I cut down).

Verb

accīdent

  1. third-person plural future active indicative of accīdō

Middle French

Noun

accident m (plural accidens)

  1. accident (unexpected outcome)

Old French

Noun

accident m (oblique plural accidenz or accidentz, nominative singular accidenz or accidentz, nominative plural accident)

  1. accident (chance occurrence)
  2. symptom (medical)

Descendants


Romanian

Etymology

From French accident

Noun

accident n (plural accidente)

  1. accident

Declension


Scots

Pronunciation

Noun

accident (plural accidents)

  1. An accident; a coincidental occurence or event.

References